Sensormatic hard tags

Great Power Comes With The Use Of Sensormatic Hard Tags



 Electronic Article Surveillance – 4                                                                                       WC Blog 768
Sensormatic hard tags – 3

Great Power Comes With The Use Of Sensormatic Hard Tags

     Electronic article surveillance is an extremely popular form of retail security but if it is not implemented properly it can become problematic. I do not say this to discourage owners and managers from purchasing a Sensormatic security system or Sensormatic tags but to make sure that people understand there are responsibilities that come with owning and using a system. To steal a quote from the “Spiderman” movie, “With great power comes great responsibility”. Anti-theft systems are powerful and can stop shoplifting but they can hurt customer service too.

     I have long believed that the failure to remove Sensormatic hard tags when a customer makes a purchase does cause a problem for the retailer. Shoppers get irritated and embarrassed by false alarms. The alarm itself causes a distraction to other shoppers (which is okay if the alarm is legitimate but not because of a cashier error). False alarms take up unnecessary time from the responding supervisor. To add to all of these I have noticed that some websites that claim to tell people how to remove electronic article surveillance tags (not related to Sensormatic or any anti-theft system dealer or manufacturer) allegedly do so in response to finding tags still on merchandise after a customer gets home. I do know that tags are sometimes left on merchandise and it does create a headache for the patron. It has happened to me and I have had to go back to the store and have the tag removed. Did the alarm sound when I left the store? Yes, I think so, other people were walking out and in at the same time. After waiting for someone to respond to the alarm I got irritated and left. As you would expect when I returned the alarm went off again and people looked at me and I was further annoyed. Then there is the look from the return desk employee that lets you know they don’t quite believe your story with or without a receipt. Customer distractions can lead to customer dissatisfaction and THAT can hurt future sales from that shopper and those friends of theirs they talk to about their experience.

     I want to digress for a moment and talk about those websites that allege to “show” or “tell” someone how to remove Sensormatic hard tags without the proper removal tool only a store should possess. After reading through several of these sites I just shook my head in disgust. First, if I take them at their word that they are “helping” those who have made purchases and found a tag left on their merchandise, I can still say they are not helping. The methods that I was reading about would very likely lead to damaged product completely defeating the purpose for not returning to the store. The methods could also result in injury to the person following the ill-advised instructions. I do not wish to see people get injured especially when they are following stupid advice. Second, I don’t buy that the writers or videographer wannabe’s are really trying to help hapless shoppers. I happen to believe the intention of these people is to encourage theft. Why would they do that? I can’t speak to their reasoning, of course I can’t explain why people want to shoplift either all I know is I have dedicated many years to catching and stopping criminals. 

     Retail owners and managers please heed my recommendation, use electronic article surveillance in your store. If you have an older system, consider upgrading to a newer, more energy-efficient Sensormatic system. Use genuine Sensormatic hard tags to protect against theft and increase the profit for your store through reduced shortage and increased sales (resulting from the decreased theft). I can hear it now, “But you just told me that there can be customer service issues if cashiers don’t remove tags”. What I said was there can be problems if a system is not implemented properly. That is where Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. (LPSI) comes in to play. With the purchase of a new Sensormatic security system from LPSI you receive the training you and your team need to properly operate a system. From tagging of products to system testing and alarm response LPSI will ensure your store will operate an effective anti-theft program. 

     Faulty loss prevention equipment, lack of training and poor tag removal processes can hurt a store’s reputation. Sensormatic has a reputation as a leader in retail theft prevention and is used by retailers world-wide to help fight shortage and improve profits. LPSI will show you how you can have great responsibility as you as add the great power of a Sensormatic electronic article surveillance system.
For more information on Sensormatic hard tags contact us or call 1.866.914.2567.

      

Electronic article surveillance is an extremely popular form of retail security but if it is not implemented properly it can become problematic. I do not say this to discourage owners and managers from purchasing a Sensormatic security system or Sensormatic tags but to make sure that people understand there are responsibilities that come with owning and using a system. To steal a quote from the “Spiderman” movie, “With great power comes great responsibility”. Anti-theft systems are powerful and can stop shoplifting but they can hurt customer service too.
     

I have long believed that the failure to remove Sensormatic hard tags when a customer makes a purchase does cause a problem for the retailer. Shoppers get irritated and embarrassed by false alarms. The alarm itself causes a distraction to other shoppers (which is okay if the alarm is legitimate but not because of a cashier error). False alarms take up unnecessary time from the responding supervisor. To add to all of these I have noticed that some websites that claim to tell people how to remove electronic article surveillance tags (not related to Sensormatic or any anti-theft system dealer or manufacturer) allegedly do so in response to finding tags still on merchandise after a customer gets home. I do know that tags are sometimes left on merchandise and it does create a headache for the patron. It has happened to me and I have had to go back to the store and have the tag removed. Did the alarm sound when I left the store? Yes, I think so, other people were walking out and in at the same time. After waiting for someone to respond to the alarm I got irritated and left. As you would expect when I returned the alarm went off again and people looked at me and I was further annoyed. Then there is the look from the return desk employee that lets you know they don’t quite believe your story with or without a receipt. Customer distractions can lead to customer dissatisfaction and THAT can hurt future sales from that shopper and those friends of theirs they talk to about their experience.
     

I want to digress for a moment and talk about those websites that allege to “show” or “tell” someone how to remove Sensormatic hard tags without the proper removal tool only a store should possess. After reading through several of these sites I just shook my head in disgust. First, if I take them at their word that they are “helping” those who have made purchases and found a tag left on their merchandise, I can still say they are not helping. The methods that I was reading about would very likely lead to damaged product completely defeating the purpose for not returning to the store. The methods could also result in injury to the person following the ill-advised instructions. I do not wish to see people get injured especially when they are following stupid advice. Second, I don’t buy that the writers or videographer wannabe’s are really trying to help hapless shoppers. I happen to believe the intention of these people is to encourage theft. Why would they do that? I can’t speak to their reasoning, of course I can’t explain why people want to shoplift either all I know is I have dedicated many years to catching and stopping criminals. 
     

Retail owners and managers please heed my recommendation, use electronic article surveillance in your store. If you have an older system, consider upgrading to a newer, more energy-efficient Sensormatic system. Use genuine Sensormatic hard tags to protect against theft and increase the profit for your store through reduced shortage and increased sales (resulting from the decreased theft). I can hear it now, “But you just told me that there can be customer service issues if cashiers don’t remove tags”. What I said was there can be problems if a system is not implemented properly. That is where Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. (LPSI) comes in to play. With the purchase of a new Sensormatic security system from LPSI you receive the training you and your team need to properly operate a system. From tagging of products to system testing and alarm response LPSI will ensure your store will operate an effective anti-theft program. 
     

Faulty loss prevention equipment, lack of training and poor tag removal processes can hurt a store’s reputation. Sensormatic has a reputation as a leader in retail theft prevention and is used by retailers world-wide to help fight shortage and improve profits. LPSI will show you how you can have great responsibility as you as add the great power of a Sensormatic electronic article surveillance system.

 

For more information on Sensormatic hard tags contact us or call 1.866.914.2567.
      

 

Rely On Sensormatic Hard Tags For All Your Loss Prevention Needs


Electronic Article Surveillance – 3                                                                                           WC Blog 760
Sensormatic Hard Tags – 4

Rely On Sensormatic Hard Tags For All Your Loss Prevention Needs

     
Can electronic article surveillance tags from one company be used with an anti-theft system from another manufacturer? The answer is yes, but why would you want to do this? I thought about this the other day as I was looking at purses and wallets in a department store with my wife. Well, she was looking at the purses and wallets I was looking at the mix of Sensormatic hard tags and another company’s hard tags. What I was seeing was a very strange mix of devices and even strategies. I have been in the Loss Prevention business for a very long time and I could not make heads or tails of what they were trying to do. From the mix of tags to what was tagged to HOW merchandise was tagged the only way I could describe what I saw was it looked like a mess. 

     How bad could things be when we are only talking about electronic article surveillance tagging? The mix of tags was the first sign of confusion in this store. Sensormatic tags are top of the line for protecting merchandise. They are reliable and can be counted on to activate the pedestals at the doors in the event someone tries to leave without paying for merchandise that is tagged. When it comes to durability their tags are as tough as tags come. There is very little chance a criminal is going to be able to force Sensormatic hard tags off of any piece of merchandise without seriously damaging the product. Since that defeats what the crook is trying to do, steal for personal use or re-sale, the criminal is usually going to go elsewhere. It makes no sense that a retailer would choose to use another brand of tag when Sensormatic provides all the protection that is needed.

       If the mix of tags wasn’t confusing enough to me I then looked at what the store had tagged and what they had not tagged. This was a mish-mash that I could not untangle in my mind. I observed a $108 handbag sitting out with no security tag. I found $50 wallets on open display with no electronic article surveillance tags and I even looked through the wallets for hidden tags (yes, I know where these tend to be concealed). I did find $50 key chains secured with two hard tags which brings me to my final head scratcher.

     I was impressed when I saw the key chains with Sensormatic hard tags looped through them by lanyards which are accessories available from Sensormatic. I was perplexed when I then saw the Sensormatic tag was secured to a stationary fixture by a different company’s alarm cable lock! Despite my best effort I could not figure out what the Loss Prevention department was trying to do. First, the purpose of any Sensormatic tag is to allow the store to put merchandise on open display so customers can pick up merchandise, examine it and have the freedom to carry the item. Associates are freed up from having to unlock display cases or secure fixtures to “show” merchandise that might not be sold. The store owner can be reassured the merchandise will be safe with Sensormatic security tags attached to products. It increases sales and reduces shortage. The idea of securing a security device with another security device makes my head spin. To use two different brands to do something this convoluted just seems nutty to me.

     If you are looking to prevent theft in your store look at a Sensormatic security system for the protection you need. Sensormatic hard tags and labels come in all of the varieties and styles necessary to keep your merchandise safe from predators while giving your customers the freedom they want to shop in your store. There are other brands on the market but none as good as a genuine Sensormatic tag. THAT is the sense of security every retailer needs to have in order to grow a business. 

Sensormatic security tags are important and we can help you with it. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.


Can electronic article surveillance tags from one company be used with an anti-theft system from another manufacturer? The answer is yes, but why would you want to do this? I thought about this the other day as I was looking at purses and wallets in a department store with my wife. Well, she was looking at the purses and wallets I was looking at the mix of Sensormatic hard tags and another company’s hard tags. What I was seeing was a very strange mix of devices and even strategies. I have been in the Loss Prevention business for a very long time and I could not make heads or tails of what they were trying to do. From the mix of tags to what was tagged to HOW merchandise was tagged the only way I could describe what I saw was it looked like a mess. 
     

How bad could things be when we are only talking about electronic article surveillance tagging? The mix of tags was the first sign of confusion in this store. Sensormatic tags are top of the line for protecting merchandise. They are reliable and can be counted on to activate the pedestals at the doors in the event someone tries to leave without paying for merchandise that is tagged. When it comes to durability their tags are as tough as tags come. There is very little chance a criminal is going to be able to force Sensormatic hard tags off of any piece of merchandise without seriously damaging the product. Since that defeats what the crook is trying to do, steal for personal use or re-sale, the criminal is usually going to go elsewhere. It makes no sense that a retailer would choose to use another brand of tag when Sensormatic provides all the protection that is needed.
       

If the mix of tags wasn’t confusing enough to me I then looked at what the store had tagged and what they had not tagged. This was a mish-mash that I could not untangle in my mind. I observed a $108 handbag sitting out with no security tag. I found $50 wallets on open display with no electronic article surveillance tags and I even looked through the wallets for hidden tags (yes, I know where these tend to be concealed). I did find $50 key chains secured with two hard tags which brings me to my final head scratcher.
     

I was impressed when I saw the key chains with Sensormatic hard tags looped through them by lanyards which are accessories available from Sensormatic. I was perplexed when I then saw the Sensormatic tag was secured to a stationary fixture by a different company’s alarm cable lock! Despite my best effort I could not figure out what the Loss Prevention department was trying to do. First, the purpose of any Sensormatic tag is to allow the store to put merchandise on open display so customers can pick up merchandise, examine it and have the freedom to carry the item. Associates are freed up from having to unlock display cases or secure fixtures to “show” merchandise that might not be sold. The store owner can be reassured the merchandise will be safe with Sensormatic security tags attached to products. It increases sales and reduces shortage. The idea of securing a security device with another security device makes my head spin. To use two different brands to do something this convoluted just seems nutty to me.
     

If you are looking to prevent theft in your store look at a Sensormatic security system for the protection you need. Sensormatic hard tags and labels come in all of the varieties and styles necessary to keep your merchandise safe from predators while giving your customers the freedom they want to shop in your store. There are other brands on the market but none as good as a genuine Sensormatic tag. THAT is the sense of security every retailer needs to have in order to grow a business. 

 

Sensormatic security tags are important and we can help you with it. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.

 

A Sensormatic Security System Works Best When Merchandise Is Tagged

I was shopping in a department store with my wife and as I am prone to do I noticed the Sensormatic security system towers at the doors. Sensormatic equipment is used by 80% of the top 200 retailers in the world (Sensormatic.com). I walked through this store and saw racks and tables filled with clothing that had not been protected with any Sensormatic labels or tags. This was peculiar to me. Why in the world would you have a system in place that could prevent theft and then not protect merchandise from the very theft you installed the system to defend against?
     

The purpose of an anti-theft system is to stop shoplifting, keeping merchandise in the store so it can be sold to the shoppers who want to purchase your products. In order for the system to properly work goods have to be tagged with electronic article surveillance tags and/or labels. It may seem like this should be common sense but if it is common sense then why do I find so many instances like the one I found during my shopping trip? Is it a lack of information on how a Sensormatic security system is supposed to work? I doubt it. This business has a Loss Prevention Department, I know because twenty-eight years ago I worked for them as a Loss Prevention Officer. Is there a lack of tagging due to payroll or the cost of the tags? This should not be a reason for neglecting tagging merchandise.Sensormatic hard tags are reusable so when a large quantity of tags are bought (which should be with the purchase of a new system) they aren’t going to quickly run out and require a new set to be bought. The tagging can be done by salesfloor employees as they are working. A newly installed system may require some initial payroll investment in order to get merchandise tagged but once complete it is simply a matter of maintaining the tagging program. In fact, if you were to use the Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. Free ROI Calculator you can include payroll into the amount you are willing to spend on a new system. After the numbers are figured the calculator will show you how long it will take for a new system to pay for itself. So I left the store perplexed at the lack of tagging I noted in my visit.
     

My wife and I then went into another department store, part of a company struggling financially at this time. Again, I saw theSensormatic security system towers at the front doors. My heart sank a bit as I noted to my wife how empty the store looked, of people AND merchandise. There were very few visible employees and very few customers for that matter. I could not help but wonder if the lack of merchandise was a planned decrease in merchandise levels or if a significant portion of the emptiness was a failure to stop shoplifting or a combination? With very few of the clothing items protected with a Sensormatic security tag I could only imagine that a significant portion of the financial woes faced by this business (and empty fixtures) was due in part to a poor anti-theft strategy. Even if an item was properly tagged and someone were to start to walk out of the store and activated the tower alarm, who was going to respond to that situation? No one was around to respond and the offender would have simply walked out without a proper package or receipt check. Since I was having a difficult time finding something that was tagged in the first place I’m not sure this was a concern anyways.
     

Having a Sensormatic security system will stop shoplifting but it requires some amount of effort. Proper tagging of merchandise, training of employees and staffing a store so someone is in a position to respond in a timely manner are important factors to consider. Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. can help you with theft prevention consultations to help make your store more money. They can even give guidance on how you can keep merchandise tagged and have employees staffed so they can respond to alarm activity. Don’t take my word for it check out their website for more information.

 

Get more information on a Sensormatic Security System, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.