SWING AWAY TO HIGHER PROFITS WITH AN GOLF CLUB TAG

SWING AWAY TO HIGHER PROFITS WITH AN O-TAG

The days are getting longer, the sun brighter and everyone seems to be outdoors more. That can only mean one thing… SUMMER is here! Outdoor grilling, fishing on the lake, and trips to the beach are all in store, and personally, I can’t wait to relax a bit and play a few rounds of golf. This just happens to be one category that seems to do very well this time of year.  As with any hot item, as retailers, we have to figure out ways to Prevent Shoplifting, or we’ll be blinded by the shrink come inventory night. 

Golf clubs can be tricky to keep secure. While, it’s very rare for a club to be outright stolen, what is most common is price-switching, where a lower price barcode is affixed to a higher priced club. It’s difficult for a cashier to spot the difference, so that’s where the O-Tag comes in. I’ve got two perfect examples of these tags in action from just this past year. 
I was doing some audits on a cashier when I heard our EAS system activate. I looked up and noticed a taller gentlemen walking, with a funny limp, out the front door. I saw this guy earlier and he wasn’t walking like that. Finding it odd, I followed him outside to see where he went. When he saw me come out of the store, he attempted to run, however found it difficult to do so with a number of golf clubs wedged down his pants. As he started to flee, he just couldn’t bend his knees enough and he toppled over. It was hilarious to watch. 
As he laid there, flailing on the ground, I noticed the golf clubs (and one of my O-Tags), running down the side of his let. There happened to be a police officer in the parking lot, so I waved him down and pointed the thief out to him. The shoplifter was still on the ground. He could not get enough of a bend in his leg to lift himself up. Later, I found that he had a harness style rig in his pants that allowed him to conceal the golf clubs. The police officer causally strolled over, cuffed the guy, brought him to his feet and recovered my merchandise. Had it not been for the O-Tag, I would’ve never realized this guy walked out of the door. 

Now, that’s really loss reaction. You want to out-right Prevent Shoplifting before it ever happens. This is where a well-trained cashier team can put dollars back to your bottom line every day of the week. Like I said above, cashiers have a hard time discerning an expensive golf club from a cheaper one. I’d suggest you apply an O-Tag to any club valued at more than $100. Second part of this process is to train your cashier to recognize the tag and at what price-point it will be attached. 

By utilizing the O-Tag and combining that with some training, your cashier should be able to immediately recognize when a price-switch is taking place. If a suspect customer presents a club, secured with a tag, but it rings for $12.99, the cashier should call a manager. With minimal effort and expense, it is that easy to Prevent Shoplifting. 




 


Get more information on O-TAG, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.

The days are getting longer, the sun brighter and everyone seems to be outdoors more. That can only mean one thing… SUMMER is here! Outdoor grilling, fishing on the lake, and trips to the beach are all in store, and personally, I can’t wait to relax a bit and play a few rounds of golf. This just happens to be one category that seems to do very well this time of year.  As with any hot item, as retailers, we have to figure out ways to Prevent Shoplifting, or we’ll be blinded by the shrink come inventory night. 

 Golf clubs can be tricky to keep secure. While, it’s very rare for a club to be outright stolen, what is most common is price-switching, where a lower price barcode is affixed to a higher priced club. It’s difficult for a cashier to spot the difference, so that’s where the golf club tag comes in. I’ve got two perfect examples of these tags in action from just this past year. 

 

 I was doing some audits on a cashier when I heard our EAS system activate. I looked up and noticed a taller gentlemen walking, with a funny limp, out the front door. I saw this guy earlier and he wasn’t walking like that. Finding it odd, I followed him outside to see where he went. When he saw me come out of the store, he attempted to run, however found it difficult to do so with a number of golf clubs wedged down his pants. As he started to flee, he just couldn’t bend his knees enough and he toppled over. It was hilarious to watch. 

 

 As he laid there, flailing on the ground, I noticed the golf clubs (and one of my golf club tags), running down the side of his let. There happened to be a police officer in the parking lot, so I waved him down and pointed the thief out to him. The shoplifter was still on the ground. He could not get enough of a bend in his leg to lift himself up. Later, I found that he had a harness style rig in his pants that allowed him to conceal the golf clubs. The police officer causally strolled over, cuffed the guy, brought him to his feet and recovered my merchandise. Had it not been for the golf club tag, I would’ve never realized this guy walked out of the door. 

 Now, that’s really loss reaction. You want to out-right Prevent Shoplifting before it ever happens. This is where a well-trained cashier team can put dollars back to your bottom line every day of the week. Like I said above, cashiers have a hard time discerning an expensive golf club from a cheaper one. I’d suggest you apply an golf club tag to any club valued at more than $100. Second part of this process is to train your cashier to recognize the tag and at what price-point it will be attached. 

 By utilizing the golf club tag and combining that with some training, your cashier should be able to immediately recognize when a price-switch is taking place. If a suspect customer presents a club, secured with a tag, but it rings for $12.99, the cashier should call a manager. With minimal effort and expense, it is that easy to Prevent Shoplifting. 


Get more information on golf club tag, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.

Even Though States May Legalize Marijuana Employers Can Use Drug Testing To Screen Out Drug Users


Drug testing -4                                                                                                                          WC Blog 555
Employment Drug Screening -3

Even Though States May Legalize Marijuana Employers Can Use Drug Testing To Screen Out Drug Users

     For many employers drug testing is an important tool used to keep the workplace safe due to accidents and to minimize their risk of theft and fraud. Employers were able to refuse to hire an applicant when results from an employment drug screening returned with positive results for drug use. Today, there are 29 states that have legalized “medical marijuana”.  According to businessinsider.com there are 9 other states that have legalized what is referred to as recreational marijuana. Despite the fact the drug is still illegal under Federal law, there are legal issues that have to be considered with respect to employers, employees and marijuana. If a state has chosen to make recreational use of marijuana legal if a person decides to use it, can that person be denied employment if it shows up in an employment drug screening?  
      Let’s take a moment to talk about pre-employment drug testing. Prior to extending a job offer to a candidate an employer may require that applicant to undergo a drug test. These tests may require a urine sample (the most common), blood sample, hair sample or body fluid from a mouth swab. The applicant usually goes to a testing/collection site and in a controlled environment provides the sample. Steps are taken by the agency to minimize the opportunity for tampering with samples. Testing is conducted and results of the test sent back to the employer. If a test is returned and indicates the applicant is or has used drugs the employer may choose to not hire the candidate. I have seen appeal processes where candidates may be provided an opportunity to present evidence that the results are faulty or they were taking a prescribed medication under the care of a doctor. There may be times when a test sample comes back “inconclusive” and the employer may require the candidate to undergo another test. There is no requirement I could find that an employer has to hire someone whose drug test returns positive.

     Now with so many states making some variations of marijuana use legal the question is raised whether employers have to accommodate those who choose to use marijuana or other drugs when they are not on company time. Let’s be honest alcoholic beverages are not allowed to be consumed in the majority of businesses by employees but are not restricted when the employee is not at work. That is, as long as the employee does not report to work under the influence of alcoholic beverages. I took a look at one website that is clearly supportive of legalized marijuana and they warn their readers that businesses have the right to drug test. Not only that, they acknowledge that employees who test positive may be fired for drug use. On the cannabist.com they post a story, “Five things for employees to know in states with marijuana laws” by Bob Salsberg, the associated press, Dec 1, 2016, “Bottom line: You can’t come to work high. And you can still be fired – or not hired – for failing a drug test even if you’re not the least bit impaired at work. All the states with legalized recreational pot have exemptions for workplace drug policies.” The point is clear you, the employer, have rights and you don’t have to hire or retain someone who chooses to use drugs. For the time being employment drug screening is afforded protection by the judicial system.

     Can employers count on the courts to continue to protect their right to continue drug testing of potential employees or those who are already on the payroll? For marijuana it may not be the case. In a White Paper “What Will Legal Marijuana Cost Employers?” written by Sue Rusche and Kevin Sabet, PhD, the authors state on page 14, “There is no doubt employers will face increasing litigation costs as employees try to assert their rights to use marijuana on the job or after hours, even though research suggests they may be impaired at work the next day.”  Impaired workers are more prone to having accidents that harm themselves or potentially others (customers or other employees). Accidents cost the employer money whether it is through a workman’s comp. claim or having to pay for the costs of treatment for a customer. It is an unnecessary expense that hurts the bottom line to your business.

     Bill Bregar, founder of Loss Prevention Systems Inc. knows the high costs for retailers in hiring drug users and addicts. Theft issues, safety concerns, lost time from work are just a few of the problems associated with drug use. In order to assist businesses in remaining profitable Loss Prevention Systems Inc. offers drug testing services for employers. The battle over legalized marijuana may go on for some time but you still have rights. Use employment drug screening to keep your business safe.
 Drug testing is important and we can help you with it. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.

For many employers drug testing is an important tool used to keep the workplace safe due to accidents and to minimize their risk of theft and fraud. Employers were able to refuse to hire an applicant when results from an employment drug screening returned with positive results for drug use. Today, there are 29 states that have legalized “medical marijuana”.  According to businessinsider.com there are 9 other states that have legalized what is referred to as recreational marijuana. Despite the fact the drug is still illegal under Federal law, there are legal issues that have to be considered with respect to employers, employees and marijuana. If a state has chosen to make recreational use of marijuana legal if a person decides to use it, can that person be denied employment if it shows up in an employment drug screening?       

 

 Let’s take a moment to talk about pre-employment drug testing. Prior to extending a job offer to a candidate an employer may require that applicant to undergo a drug test. These tests may require a urine sample (the most common), blood sample, hair sample or body fluid from a mouth swab. The applicant usually goes to a testing/collection site and in a controlled environment provides the sample. Steps are taken by the agency to minimize the opportunity for tampering with samples. Testing is conducted and results of the test sent back to the employer. If a test is returned and indicates the applicant is or has used drugs the employer may choose to not hire the candidate. I have seen appeal processes where candidates may be provided an opportunity to present evidence that the results are faulty or they were taking a prescribed medication under the care of a doctor. There may be times when a test sample comes back “inconclusive” and the employer may require the candidate to undergo another test. There is no requirement I could find that an employer has to hire someone whose drug test returns positive.

 

 Now with so many states making some variations of marijuana use legal the question is raised whether employers have to accommodate those who choose to use marijuana or other drugs when they are not on company time. Let’s be honest alcoholic beverages are not allowed to be consumed in the majority of businesses by employees but are not restricted when the employee is not at work. That is, as long as the employee does not report to work under the influence of alcoholic beverages. I took a look at one website that is clearly supportive of legalized marijuana and they warn their readers that businesses have the right to drug test. Not only that, they acknowledge that employees who test positive may be fired for drug use. On the cannabist.com they post a story, “Five things for employees to know in states with marijuana laws” by Bob Salsberg, the associated press, Dec 1, 2016, “Bottom line: You can’t come to work high. And you can still be fired – or not hired – for failing a drug test even if you’re not the least bit impaired at work. All the states with legalized recreational pot have exemptions for workplace drug policies.” The point is clear you, the employer, have rights and you don’t have to hire or retain someone who chooses to use drugs. For the time being employment drug screening is afforded protection by the judicial system.

 

 Can employers count on the courts to continue to protect their right to continue drug testing of potential employees or those who are already on the payroll? For marijuana it may not be the case. In a White Paper “What Will Legal Marijuana Cost Employers?” written by Sue Rusche and Kevin Sabet, PhD, the authors state on page 14, “There is no doubt employers will face increasing litigation costs as employees try to assert their rights to use marijuana on the job or after hours, even though research suggests they may be impaired at work the next day.”  Impaired workers are more prone to having accidents that harm themselves or potentially others (customers or other employees). Accidents cost the employer money whether it is through a workman’s comp. claim or having to pay for the costs of treatment for a customer. It is an unnecessary expense that hurts the bottom line to your business.

 

 Bill Bregar, founder of Loss Prevention Systems Inc. knows the high costs for retailers in hiring drug users and addicts. Theft issues, safety concerns, lost time from work are just a few of the problems associated with drug use. In order to assist businesses in remaining profitable Loss Prevention Systems Inc. offers drug testing services for employers. The battle over legalized marijuana may go on for some time but you still have rights. Use employment drug screening to keep your business safe. 

 

Drug testing is important and we can help you with it. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.


 

Senseless Arguments Against A Door Counting Sensor

Door Counting Sensor- 5                                                                                                           WC Blog 499
Retail Traffic Counting-4


Senseless Arguments Against A Door Counting Sensor

     When you hear the mention of a door counting sensor in retail what comes to your mind? Do you think only in terms of measuring your foot traffic and that’s it? Are you dismissing the importance of retail traffic counting because you are concerned that it will just be more data you have to file away? I was surprised to learn that two objections some business owners have to counters are the appearance and that they count children who those owners don’t consider important because they don’t spend the money. If these are concerns you have had and it has discouraged you from investing in a door counting sensor for your business this article is for you.

     I know that some readers are familiar with the concept of retail traffic counting but may not know how it is done so I am going to digress briefly for the uninitiated. The basic idea is that a store uses a door counting sensor to identify the number of people entering the business. We will discuss how that information may be used a bit later. The sensor itself can be a stand-alone unit or in stores that utilize electronic article surveillance pedestals to prevent shoplifting a sensor can be attached directly to the pedestals. It’s that simple! 

     As I said earlier, there are two major objections I found that are used as excuses not to invest in a retail traffic counting system. The first objection was that some units have the appearance of a cctv camera and owners and managers are afraid it will make customers uncomfortable. Hogwash! There are very few retailers in this day and age which do not employ some type of video surveillance. It may be a Public View monitor at the entrance to a store or in an area known to be vulnerable to theft. As a Loss Prevention Manager I have seen them used in high end department stores at the entrance to fitting rooms. I would argue that the extensive use of cctv has actually de-sensitized shoppers to cameras and video monitors to the point they have negligible effects on deterring shoplifters. The other rebuttal to this objection is that when the unit is tied in to an EAS pedestal it is barely noticeable. Shoppers hardly notice pedestals when they enter or leave (unless it alarms) so adding a small accessory to it won’t cause any distractions.

     The other argument against a door counting sensor is that they count small children who won’t be spending money. That is to say the results are skewed and therefore irrelevant. Well, Mr. or Ms. Grocery Store Owner, don’t you think that those children are influencing their parents while the parents are shopping? Do you display children’s cereals on endcaps? Do you have gum, candy and soft drink coolers at your checkout stands? Why do you think food manufacturers spend so much money on advertising and packaging? In many cases it is to appeal to the children who will influence parents spending habits. Clothing retailers, the same goes for you. There is a reason commercials are made to make clothing for kids to look “cool” and popular. Toy store retailers, I don’t think I should even have to say anything to you. How many children are buying your merchandise? That’s right, very few. It is the parents and usually a response to what their children have asked for on birthdays, holidays and just pointed out while watching a television ad. If you are striving to get people to visit your store you are going to reach out to as many folks as possible and that includes families with children. 

     I mentioned I would discuss how information from a Retail Traffic Counting system could benefit your store. Let’s suppose you advertise a new line of product you are carrying. You may use a number of media venues and door and window signage to get out the message. You create a new product display in a prominent location. The success of the new product can’t be measured just in sales dollars. A traffic counter will tell you how many people entered your store. When you have previous information to compare to you can see whether your new product drew in more people. That measure of success is something you can build on to keep new customers coming back time after time.

     A door counting sensor isn’t just another source of useless data. If employed properly and the information understood correctly it can be a powerful tool for measuring success of merchandising. It can also be used to improve your payroll allocation, but that is for another article. 
For more information about a door counting sensor contact us or call 1.866.914.2567

     

When you hear the mention of a door counting sensor in retail what comes to your mind? Do you think only in terms of measuring your foot traffic and that’s it? Are you dismissing the importance of retail traffic counting because you are concerned that it will just be more data you have to file away? I was surprised to learn that two objections some business owners have to counters are the appearance and that they count children who those owners don’t consider important because they don’t spend the money. If these are concerns you have had and it has discouraged you from investing in a door counting sensor for your business this article is for you.
     

I know that some readers are familiar with the concept of retail traffic counting but may not know how it is done so I am going to digress briefly for the uninitiated. The basic idea is that a store uses a door counting sensor to identify the number of people entering the business. We will discuss how that information may be used a bit later. The sensor itself can be a stand-alone unit or in stores that utilize electronic article surveillance pedestals to prevent shoplifting a sensor can be attached directly to the pedestals. It’s that simple! 
     

As I said earlier, there are two major objections I found that are used as excuses not to invest in a retail traffic counting system. The first objection was that some units have the appearance of a cctv camera and owners and managers are afraid it will make customers uncomfortable. Hogwash! There are very few retailers in this day and age which do not employ some type of video surveillance. It may be a Public View monitor at the entrance to a store or in an area known to be vulnerable to theft. As a Loss Prevention Manager I have seen them used in high end department stores at the entrance to fitting rooms. I would argue that the extensive use of cctv has actually de-sensitized shoppers to cameras and video monitors to the point they have negligible effects on deterring shoplifters. The other rebuttal to this objection is that when the unit is tied in to an EAS pedestal it is barely noticeable. Shoppers hardly notice pedestals when they enter or leave (unless it alarms) so adding a small accessory to it won’t cause any distractions.
     

The other argument against a door counting sensor is that they count small children who won’t be spending money. That is to say the results are skewed and therefore irrelevant. Well, Mr. or Ms. Grocery Store Owner, don’t you think that those children are influencing their parents while the parents are shopping? Do you display children’s cereals on endcaps? Do you have gum, candy and soft drink coolers at your checkout stands? Why do you think food manufacturers spend so much money on advertising and packaging? In many cases it is to appeal to the children who will influence parents spending habits. Clothing retailers, the same goes for you. There is a reason commercials are made to make clothing for kids to look “cool” and popular. Toy store retailers, I don’t think I should even have to say anything to you. How many children are buying your merchandise? That’s right, very few. It is the parents and usually a response to what their children have asked for on birthdays, holidays and just pointed out while watching a television ad. If you are striving to get people to visit your store you are going to reach out to as many folks as possible and that includes families with children. 
     

I mentioned I would discuss how information from a Retail Traffic Counting system could benefit your store. Let’s suppose you advertise a new line of product you are carrying. You may use a number of media venues and door and window signage to get out the message. You create a new product display in a prominent location. The success of the new product can’t be measured just in sales dollars. A traffic counter will tell you how many people entered your store. When you have previous information to compare to you can see whether your new product drew in more people. That measure of success is something you can build on to keep new customers coming back time after time.
     

A door counting sensor isn’t just another source of useless data. If employed properly and the information understood correctly it can be a powerful tool for measuring success of merchandising. It can also be used to improve your payroll allocation, but that is for another article. 

 

For more information about a door counting sensor contact us or call 1.866.914.2567