Don’t Have A Heart Attack Over The Use Of Alpha Bug Tags To Protect Mobile Medical Devices From Theft, EAS Won’t Interfere With Pacemakers

Alpha Bug Tag-3                                                                                                                   WC Blog 350
i-Pad theft-3
Don’t Have A Heart Attack Over The Use Of Alpha Bug Tags To Protect Mobile Medical Devices From Theft, EAS Won’t Interfere With Pacemakers
     When I worked as a Retail Loss Prevention Manager our store was located in a place where retirees would often move to for the winter in order to escape the cold.  One of the questions I was asked on a fairly regular basis was if our electronic article surveillance (EAS) system would interfere with pacemakers. Customers were concerned about the tags we used but they were really fearful of the EAS pedestals since they were located right at the doors to the building. I would try to reassure them that there was no health concerns associated with the system and after a few minutes that was usually enough to allay any trepidations the customers might have had. There were some though that no matter how much time I spent trying to reassure them they could not get over that hurdle. That is why the question was posed to me more often than it may have been to a peer somewhere else. Studies have been done that show there is minimal chance EAS could interfere with pacemakers and similar medical devices. Stores aren’t the only place the technology is used.  It is important for healthcare providers to understand this as they consider the need to protect mobile medical devices from tablet theft of i-Pad theft. 
     Many medical offices from general practitioners to dentists are realizing the advantages of using mobile technology to improve patient care, share information with patients and protect records. Loose papers and stray clipboards are slowly being replaced with an i-Pad or a tablet. Patients are now using these devices to register new accounts including all of their personal information but now it is quickly accessed at the touch of a button. The down side is that if one of these mobile devices is stolen there is a chance client information can be accessed by criminals. Many offices that have made the switch to technology over paper have taken steps to protect the mobile units with an Alpha Bug Tag attached to a device and set up EAS towers at the doors. When protected devices are carried into the detection field of the towers, alarms alert employees and who then prevent an i-Pad theft from taking place. The tags are also tamper proof which prevents a thief from being able to remove an anti-theft device and steal a tablet. Attempts to pry a tag off of a device sets off an alarm built into the Alpha Bug Tag again foiling efforts of someone trying to steal protected information.
     The safety of electronic article surveillance on pacemakers has been documented many times. For instance the American Heart Association on their website www.heart.org states, “Interactions with EAS systems are unlikely to cause clinically significant symptoms in most patients.” On the other hand, with regard to MP3 players the website says, “Most contain a magnetic substance and research has documented that placing the headphones too close to the pacemaker caused interference.”  Another concern is raised with power- generating equipment, arc welding equipment and powerful magnets. The site continues, “Such as found in some medical devices, heavy equipment or motors can inhibit pulse generators.” On their website, hopkinsmedicine.org, Johns Hopkins Hospital article for potential patients, “Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) Insertion” provides the caution, “Anti-Theft systems or electronic article surveillance (EAS) used in department stores may interact with an ICD. The American Heart Association recommends you should not lean on or stand in this equipment but should pass quickly through the detection system.” 
     There is potentially more risk involved in a visit to a doctor’s office or hospital from the medical equipment in those facilities than that associated with EAS. The American Heart Association warns of interference from MRI’s, Radio Frequency Ablation (a medical procedure that uses radio waves to manage a variety of arrhythmias) and Short-wave or microwave diathermy (a medical procedure that uses high-frequency, high-intensity signals for physical therapy). Each of these can disrupt or damage the pacemaker a patient is carrying. 
     The point I am making is that medical providers should adapt mobile devices in the practice to improve service and save time. Any concern over i-Pad theft or tablet theft and the compromise of protected patient information can be laid to rest with the use of Alpha Bug Tags and EAS technology. Patients who may have pacemakers need not worry about interference with their devices.
Need information on Alpha Bug Tags? Give us a call at 1.866.914.2567 now.

When I worked as a Retail Loss Prevention Manager our store was located in a place where retirees would often move to for the winter in order to escape the cold.  One of the questions I was asked on a fairly regular basis was if our electronic article surveillance (EAS) system would interfere with pacemakers. Customers were concerned about the tags we used but they were really fearful of the EAS pedestals since they were located right at the doors to the building. I would try to reassure them that there was no health concerns associated with the system and after a few minutes that was usually enough to allay any trepidations the customers might have had. There were some though that no matter how much time I spent trying to reassure them they could not get over that hurdle. That is why the question was posed to me more often than it may have been to a peer somewhere else. Studies have been done that show there is minimal chance EAS could interfere with pacemakers and similar medical devices. Stores aren’t the only place the technology is used.  It is important for healthcare providers to understand this as they consider the need to protect mobile medical devices from tablet theft of i-Pad theft. 
     

Many medical offices from general practitioners to dentists are realizing the advantages of using mobile technology to improve patient care, share information with patients and protect records. Loose papers and stray clipboards are slowly being replaced with an i-Pad or a tablet. Patients are now using these devices to register new accounts including all of their personal information but now it is quickly accessed at the touch of a button. The down side is that if one of these mobile devices is stolen there is a chance client information can be accessed by criminals. Many offices that have made the switch to technology over paper have taken steps to protect the mobile units with an Alpha Bug Tag attached to a device and set up EAS towers at the doors. When protected devices are carried into the detection field of the towers, alarms alert employees and who then prevent an i-Pad theft from taking place. The tags are also tamper proof which prevents a thief from being able to remove an anti-theft device and steal a tablet. Attempts to pry a tag off of a device sets off an alarm built into the Alpha Bug Tag again foiling efforts of someone trying to steal protected information.
     

The safety of electronic article surveillance on pacemakers has been documented many times. For instance the American Heart Association on their website www.heart.org states, “Interactions with EAS systems are unlikely to cause clinically significant symptoms in most patients.” On the other hand, with regard to MP3 players the website says, “Most contain a magnetic substance and research has documented that placing the headphones too close to the pacemaker caused interference.”  Another concern is raised with power- generating equipment, arc welding equipment and powerful magnets. The site continues, “Such as found in some medical devices, heavy equipment or motors can inhibit pulse generators.” On their website, hopkinsmedicine.org, Johns Hopkins Hospital article for potential patients, “Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) Insertion” provides the caution, “Anti-Theft systems or electronic article surveillance (EAS) used in department stores may interact with an ICD. The American Heart Association recommends you should not lean on or stand in this equipment but should pass quickly through the detection system.” 
     

There is potentially more risk involved in a visit to a doctor’s office or hospital from the medical equipment in those facilities than that associated with EAS. The American Heart Association warns of interference from MRI’s, Radio Frequency Ablation (a medical procedure that uses radio waves to manage a variety of arrhythmias) and Short-wave or microwave diathermy (a medical procedure that uses high-frequency, high-intensity signals for physical therapy). Each of these can disrupt or damage the pacemaker a patient is carrying. 
     

The point I am making is that medical providers should adapt mobile devices in the practice to improve service and save time. Any concern over i-Pad theft or tablet theft and the compromise of protected patient information can be laid to rest with the use of Alpha Bug Tags and EAS technology. Patients who may have pacemakers need not worry about interference with their devices.

 

Need information on Alpha Bug Tags? Give us a call at 1.866.914.2567 now.

 

To Stop Or To Deter Thieves To Prevent Shoplifting; Tips To Help You Decide The Approach That Fits Your Needs – Part 1

I’ve been in Retail Loss Prevention and retail as a whole for nearly 27 years. During that time I have obviously been involved in many efforts to prevent shoplifting from implementing merchandise protection strategies that use retail anti-theft devices like an Alpha Hang Tag to following and actually catching shoplifters. Over that time I found I changed how I dealt with the people I caught stealing from the stores I was working at. As a young man, even with my military experience, I probably was a bit more aggressive than I needed to be in some of my apprehensions. I didn’t yell or holler often, but in some instances I was a little meaner than I needed to be and that is the point of this article. Do you catch shoplifters, do you deter them and how do you deal with the people if you DO catch them shoplifting from your store?

 

 Before I delve into that conversation I think it is important to discuss what I mean by merchandise protection strategies. Basically every store, regardless of how small or large, should have a merchandise protection plan in place. Is the store going to use lock-up cases or retail anti-theft devices like the electronic article surveillance (EAS) Alpha Hang Tag? The devices work with (EAS) radio frequency pedestals. They can be wraps, hard tags or cables that secure merchandise and prevent theft while allowing customers to walk around the store with the merchandise. As an example I already referenced, the Alpha Hang Tag has two pieces that clip together to reinforce packaging hang tabs and blister pack tabs. Merchandise can no longer be cut from locking peghooks and the EAS protection ensures an alarm will sound at the EAS towers if a thief tries to conceal merchandise and sneak it out the doors.  Is the store going to install a closed circuit television system to record potential high theft areas? Perhaps cctv will be used to record cash registers to monitor for internal theft. All of these things need to be considered in a strategy plan to reduce merchandise shortage and improve profitability.

 

 So to return to my point, if you are deciding if you are going to stop shoplifters (or maybe you already do) or have managers or a Loss Prevention Associate detain shoplifters how do you handle them? First, you have to be careful to remember that each situation is different.  You must be ready to adapt to the person and how they respond when you stop them. When I started out in the business I was firm with everyone, I wasn’t rude, but I was not friendly with the suspect either. Over the years I modified my approach somewhat, taking into account the situation, the number of people I was dealing with and watching for reaction signals from shoplifters. I learned that the teenager who was alone might be much more compliant with my requests than the teenager with a group of friends. Frequently pulling someone out of a group causes that person to want to show off and present a “tough” image for their friends. That well-dressed “business” man or woman may very well be quiet and not want to be noticed or they may be the person that starts screaming and yelling and acting out in an attempt to embarrass you and hoping that you will back down. I learned over time that sometimes being friendly is a good way to disarm a tense situation. While a Loss Prevention Associate should always identify who they are when the stop someone, a manager can just say hello and offer their first name. Don’t forget, the shoplifter is always on edge when they approach the doors so the shock of being stopped amps up an already tense situation. Using a friendly approach can take the tension down a notch. It may get you your merchandise back even if the suspect chooses to run.

 

 Maybe you are leaning more towards a deterrence approach to prevent shoplifting. Retail anti-theft devices and a prolific number of employees to provide customer service may be your answer to reduce shortage. CCTV cameras and public view monitors can add an additional layer of security so criminals are less inclined to steal.

 

 For those business owners leaning towards the possibility of apprehending shoplifters, in Part 2 of this series I discuss some tips you will want to consider. Theft is not a joke and stopping thieves is serious business. Consider all the facts and consider consulting with Loss Prevention System Inc. Professionals who can provide training seminars that might help in your decision.

 

Need information on how to prevent shoplifting? Give us a call at 1.866.914.2567 now.

 

 

To Stop Or To Deter Thieves To Prevent Shoplifting; Tips To Help You Decide The Approach That Fits Your Needs – Part 1

I’ve been in Retail Loss Prevention and retail as a whole for nearly 27 years. During that time I have obviously been involved in many efforts to prevent shoplifting from implementing merchandise protection strategies that use retail anti-theft devices like an Alpha Hang Tag to following and actually catching shoplifters. Over that time I found I changed how I dealt with the people I caught stealing from the stores I was working at. As a young man, even with my military experience, I probably was a bit more aggressive than I needed to be in some of my apprehensions. I didn’t yell or holler often, but in some instances I was a little meaner than I needed to be and that is the point of this article. Do you catch shoplifters, do you deter them and how do you deal with the people if you DO catch them shoplifting from your store?

 

 Before I delve into that conversation I think it is important to discuss what I mean by merchandise protection strategies. Basically every store, regardless of how small or large, should have a merchandise protection plan in place. Is the store going to use lock-up cases or retail anti-theft devices like the electronic article surveillance (EAS) Alpha Hang Tag? The devices work with (EAS) radio frequency pedestals. They can be wraps, hard tags or cables that secure merchandise and prevent theft while allowing customers to walk around the store with the merchandise. As an example I already referenced, the Alpha Hang Tag has two pieces that clip together to reinforce packaging hang tabs and blister pack tabs. Merchandise can no longer be cut from locking peghooks and the EAS protection ensures an alarm will sound at the EAS towers if a thief tries to conceal merchandise and sneak it out the doors.  Is the store going to install a closed circuit television system to record potential high theft areas? Perhaps cctv will be used to record cash registers to monitor for internal theft. All of these things need to be considered in a strategy plan to reduce merchandise shortage and improve profitability.

 

 So to return to my point, if you are deciding if you are going to stop shoplifters (or maybe you already do) or have managers or a Loss Prevention Associate detain shoplifters how do you handle them? First, you have to be careful to remember that each situation is different.  You must be ready to adapt to the person and how they respond when you stop them. When I started out in the business I was firm with everyone, I wasn’t rude, but I was not friendly with the suspect either. Over the years I modified my approach somewhat, taking into account the situation, the number of people I was dealing with and watching for reaction signals from shoplifters. I learned that the teenager who was alone might be much more compliant with my requests than the teenager with a group of friends. Frequently pulling someone out of a group causes that person to want to show off and present a “tough” image for their friends. That well-dressed “business” man or woman may very well be quiet and not want to be noticed or they may be the person that starts screaming and yelling and acting out in an attempt to embarrass you and hoping that you will back down. I learned over time that sometimes being friendly is a good way to disarm a tense situation. While a Loss Prevention Associate should always identify who they are when the stop someone, a manager can just say hello and offer their first name. Don’t forget, the shoplifter is always on edge when they approach the doors so the shock of being stopped amps up an already tense situation. Using a friendly approach can take the tension down a notch. It may get you your merchandise back even if the suspect chooses to run.

 

 Maybe you are leaning more towards a deterrence approach to prevent shoplifting. Retail anti-theft devices and a prolific number of employees to provide customer service may be your answer to reduce shortage. CCTV cameras and public view monitors can add an additional layer of security so criminals are less inclined to steal.

 

 For those business owners leaning towards the possibility of apprehending shoplifters, in Part 2 of this series I discuss some tips you will want to consider. Theft is not a joke and stopping thieves is serious business. Consider all the facts and consider consulting with Loss Prevention System Inc. Professionals who can provide training seminars that might help in your decision.

 

Need information on how to prevent shoplifting? Give us a call at 1.866.914.2567 now.