iPads For Aiding Wounded Veterans In Recovery Should Be Protected from Theft With A Bug Tag And Electronic Article Surveillance Tower

 

Bug Tag-5                                                                                                                         WC Blog 460
iPad Theft-3
iPads For Aiding Wounded Veterans In Recovery Should Be Protected from Theft With A Bug Tag And Electronic Article Surveillance Tower
     As a veteran I have a special fondness for programs that assist and aid our wounded and disabled veteran warriors. Whether it is physical therapy that is needed, medical care or mental health related our soldiers deserve to receive any help necessary to get them as healthy and functional as possible. I was interested when I found information on a place called The Western Blind Rehabilitation Center (WBRC) on the website with a link to the 2016 WBRC annual review to the right side of the page   https://www.paloalto.va.gov/services/wbrc/program.asp
   The WBRC mission statement states: “The Western Blind Rehabilitation Center serves Veterans and Active Duty Service Members with vision impairment through a comprehensive evidence-based rehabilitation program that promotes independence and community reintegration…” From my reading of their 2016 FY assessment I was impressed by the programs they offer to veterans and their families that include among other things an iProgram designed to coach these visually impaired men and women on the use of iPhones and iPads. I noticed in one section of the report that they do provide Technology Security and Safety Tips which is a common sense measure. One concern I have about this or any other clinic or rehab center that uses iPads in their programs is the security of the devices to prevent iPad theft or tablet theft if they use Android devices. It is my desire to see these locations use a Bug Tag to prevent criminals from stealing such a valuable asset.
     iPad theft is a very real problem for medical facilities. The devices are small enough to slip into a purse or a jacket pocket. There have been documented instances where thieves have removed devices mounted in hospital lounges for patron use and the devices have been stolen in spite of being in the open and under camera surveillance. At risk is the device and the cost it carries along with any potential client information that may be on a device. For public use devices people will log in to their Apple accounts or they sync up with their personal device and forget to log off. For those that are being used for a patient or client there is a good chance patient data is maintained in the device. It could be something that seems as innocuous as name, address or phone numbers or it could be HIPPA protected information that is stored in an iPad or computer tablet. Should a criminal get that information the patient is at risk and the facility faces possible fines and lawsuits from the Department of Health and Human Services. The good news is a Bug Tag can prevent such thefts from taking place. A Bug Tag uses electronic article surveillance (EAS) technology that can interact with EAS towers to initiate an alarm if a tagged device is carried near a door. An alarm elicits an immediate response from staff workers who can recover a device before it is removed from the building. This is the same type of technology that has been successfully employed for years by retailers to stop shoplifters.
     Getting back to the WBRC report it I noted that they found “96% of iProgram participants reported increased levels of satisfaction in iPad or iPhone training and use. 97% of iProgram participants reported a decrease in perceived levels of difficulty in using the iPhone or iPad.” If these veterans are becoming more comfortable in the use of these mobile devices it can be a gateway to greater independence and “normalization” in their lives. 
     Another program that I have found that aids our wounded soldiers with iPads and computers is Soldier’s Angels.  Their “Valor-IT” program provides voice controlled laptops that allow soldiers in V.A. Medical Centers to remain in contact with “the rest of the world while during recovery”.  The other part of this program provides iPads and personal GPS devices to soldiers to “build self-confidence and independence by compensating for short-term memory loss and organizational challenges related to severe TBI and severe PTSD.” Because I would hate to see an iPad theft from a person who has sacrificed so selflessly for our nation. I would like to see the units protected with a Bug Tag.
     Confidence gained from learning how to use new technologies and being able to become more independent is priceless for our injured veterans. We owe them our gratitude and a sense of security. Make sure that personal devices are protected with a Bug Tag and an EAS system so there is one less thing for them to be concerned about on their road to recovery.
Get more information on the Bug Tag, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.
     

As a veteran I have a special fondness for programs that assist and aid our wounded and disabled veteran warriors. Whether it is physical therapy that is needed, medical care or mental health related our soldiers deserve to receive any help necessary to get them as healthy and functional as possible. I was interested when I found information on a place called The Western Blind Rehabilitation Center (WBRC) on the website with a link to the 2016 WBRC annual review to the right side of the page   https://www.paloalto.va.gov/services/wbrc/program.asp   

 

The WBRC mission statement states: “The Western Blind Rehabilitation Center serves Veterans and Active Duty Service Members with vision impairment through a comprehensive evidence-based rehabilitation program that promotes independence and community reintegration…” From my reading of their 2016 FY assessment I was impressed by the programs they offer to veterans and their families that include among other things an iProgram designed to coach these visually impaired men and women on the use of iPhones and iPads. I noticed in one section of the report that they do provide Technology Security and Safety Tips which is a common sense measure. One concern I have about this or any other clinic or rehab center that uses iPads in their programs is the security of the devices to prevent iPad theft or tablet theft if they use Android devices. It is my desire to see these locations use a Bug Tag to prevent criminals from stealing such a valuable asset.

 

iPad theft is a very real problem for medical facilities. The devices are small enough to slip into a purse or a jacket pocket. There have been documented instances where thieves have removed devices mounted in hospital lounges for patron use and the devices have been stolen in spite of being in the open and under camera surveillance. At risk is the device and the cost it carries along with any potential client information that may be on a device. For public use devices people will log in to their Apple accounts or they sync up with their personal device and forget to log off. For those that are being used for a patient or client there is a good chance patient data is maintained in the device. It could be something that seems as innocuous as name, address or phone numbers or it could be HIPPA protected information that is stored in an iPad or computer tablet. Should a criminal get that information the patient is at risk and the facility faces possible fines and lawsuits from the Department of Health and Human Services. The good news is a Bug Tag can prevent such thefts from taking place. A Bug Tag uses electronic article surveillance (EAS) technology that can interact with EAS towers to initiate an alarm if a tagged device is carried near a door. An alarm elicits an immediate response from staff workers who can recover a device before it is removed from the building. This is the same type of technology that has been successfully employed for years by retailers to stop shoplifters.

 

Getting back to the WBRC report it I noted that they found “96% of iProgram participants reported increased levels of satisfaction in iPad or iPhone training and use. 97% of iProgram participants reported a decrease in perceived levels of difficulty in using the iPhone or iPad.” If these veterans are becoming more comfortable in the use of these mobile devices it can be a gateway to greater independence and “normalization” in their lives. 

Another program that I have found that aids our wounded soldiers with iPads and computers is Soldier’s Angels.  Their “Valor-IT” program provides voice controlled laptops that allow soldiers in V.A. Medical Centers to remain in contact with “the rest of the world while during recovery”.  The other part of this program provides iPads and personal GPS devices to soldiers to “build self-confidence and independence by compensating for short-term memory loss and organizational challenges related to severe TBI and severe PTSD.” Because I would hate to see an iPad theft from a person who has sacrificed so selflessly for our nation. I would like to see the units protected with a Bug Tag.

Confidence gained from learning how to use new technologies and being able to become more independent is priceless for our injured veterans. We owe them our gratitude and a sense of security. Make sure that personal devices are protected with a Bug Tag and an EAS system so there is one less thing for them to be concerned about on their road to recovery.

 

Get more information on the Bug Tag, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.

     

 

 

Emergency Room Revolution From Paper To Computer Tablets; Protection Of Patient Information Must Be A Priority By Using A Bug Tag

Bug Tag-3                                                                                                                          WC Blog 431
Tablet theft -5


Emergency Room Revolution From Paper To Computer Tablets; Protection Of Patient Information Must Be A Priority By Using A Bug Tag

     It is remarkable to me how things have changed within the medical care industry. I remember a time when I had to take our son to the emergency room because he got a styrofoam pellet from a bean bag chair lodged in his ear. Before I could have an emergency room doctor examine him I had to complete several pages worth of paperwork just to admit him. I had to do the same thing a few years later when he cut open his chin after a spill he took in our double baby stroller. In both instances it bothered me that it seemed there was more concern over getting the paperwork filled out than to see the patient and get him taken care of. A few days ago I had my own visit to the emergency room of the same hospital. There was a stark difference in how I was served some 20+ years later than when we took our son. The paper was one sheet and I was soon taken in to see a doctor. Only a few minutes after that a nurse came by with a computer tablet on a rolling cart and a keyboard and screen and completed my admission paperwork! I didn’t have to sit and fill out all of that cumbersome information myself. Of course, as I looked at the set up I did wonder what would prevent a tablet theft by a dishonest person. I could not see anything that secured the tablet or iPad to the cart.

     How can medical tablet theft or iPad theft be prevented in a hospital or clinic? Is it truly a problem to be concerned about? Let’s address the second question first. Medical tablet theft is a concern as it can lead to compromised patient data. To prevent it from occurring a Bug Tag can be attached to a mobile device and an electronic article surveillance (EAS) pedestal set up at doorways to those areas you don’t want a tablet to be carried out of. The tag has an adhesive that holds it to the device and a tamper alarm that ensures no one can pry it off and steal the device. The Bug Tag also emits a radio frequency wave that acts in conjunction with the EAS pedestal. When a tagged unit is carried too close to a pedestal an alarm built into the pedestal is set off and personnel can respond and recover the iPad or tablet.

     As for the question as to whether a medical tablet theft would be a major concern, it certainly would be. Any stored patient data could be used for fraudulent purposes. Personal information including names, addresses and so on could be on a device and accessible by a hacker. It is possible that extracted information could then be sold or used to create fraudulent identification. If enough patients have their identity stolen a report has to be filed with DHHS and potentially large fines may be levied against the institution. This isn’t strictly a matter of cost to the institution it is a matter of loss of trust on the part of clients.

     So back to the medical tablet that was in the emergency room where I had to visit. I provided my information as requested by the nurse. I gave my name, address, age, social security number and date of birth (all of the information a criminal could want, right?). Additionally, I was asked about past surgeries, allergies to medications I might have, any prescriptions or medications I was currently taking and who my family doctor is, if I have one. I thought about the questions and wondered to myself what someone with bad intentions could do with all of that information if they were to get their hands on that tablet. My wondering was cut short when the doctor came in to treat my ailment.

     Is my information safe and secure? I have to hope so. From what I observed in that E.R., at first glance it appeared there could be a tablet theft by someone brazen enough to try it. I could be wrong but if a Bug Tag had been on that tablet I would have felt much better about the security of that device and my information. 
Get more information on the Bug Tag, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.

It is remarkable to me how things have changed within the medical care industry. I remember a time when I had to take our son to the emergency room because he got a styrofoam pellet from a bean bag chair lodged in his ear. Before I could have an emergency room doctor examine him I had to complete several pages worth of paperwork just to admit him. I had to do the same thing a few years later when he cut open his chin after a spill he took in our double baby stroller. In both instances it bothered me that it seemed there was more concern over getting the paperwork filled out than to see the patient and get him taken care of. A few days ago I had my own visit to the emergency room of the same hospital. There was a stark difference in how I was served some 20+ years later than when we took our son. The paper was one sheet and I was soon taken in to see a doctor. Only a few minutes after that a nurse came by with a computer tablet on a rolling cart and a keyboard and screen and completed my admission paperwork! I didn’t have to sit and fill out all of that cumbersome information myself. Of course, as I looked at the set up I did wonder what would prevent a tablet theft by a dishonest person. I could not see anything that secured the tablet or iPad to the cart.
     

How can medical tablet theft or iPad theft be prevented in a hospital or clinic? Is it truly a problem to be concerned about? Let’s address the second question first. Medical tablet theft is a concern as it can lead to compromised patient data. To prevent it from occurring a Bug Tag can be attached to a mobile device and an electronic article surveillance (EAS) pedestal set up at doorways to those areas you don’t want a tablet to be carried out of. The tag has an adhesive that holds it to the device and a tamper alarm that ensures no one can pry it off and steal the device. The Bug Tag also emits a radio frequency wave that acts in conjunction with the EAS pedestal. When a tagged unit is carried too close to a pedestal an alarm built into the pedestal is set off and personnel can respond and recover the iPad or tablet.
     

As for the question as to whether a medical tablet theft would be a major concern, it certainly would be. Any stored patient data could be used for fraudulent purposes. Personal information including names, addresses and so on could be on a device and accessible by a hacker. It is possible that extracted information could then be sold or used to create fraudulent identification. If enough patients have their identity stolen a report has to be filed with DHHS and potentially large fines may be levied against the institution. This isn’t strictly a matter of cost to the institution it is a matter of loss of trust on the part of clients.
     

So back to the medical tablet that was in the emergency room where I had to visit. I provided my information as requested by the nurse. I gave my name, address, age, social security number and date of birth (all of the information a criminal could want, right?). Additionally, I was asked about past surgeries, allergies to medications I might have, any prescriptions or medications I was currently taking and who my family doctor is, if I have one. I thought about the questions and wondered to myself what someone with bad intentions could do with all of that information if they were to get their hands on that tablet. My wondering was cut short when the doctor came in to treat my ailment.
     

Is my information safe and secure? I have to hope so. From what I observed in that E.R., at first glance it appeared there could be a tablet theft by someone brazen enough to try it. I could be wrong but if a Bug Tag had been on that tablet I would have felt much better about the security of that device and my information. 

 

Get more information on the Bug Tag, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.

 

Maintaining Space In Medical Facility Halls And Doorways Does Not Mean Electronic Article Surveillance Protection Is Out Of The Question; The Classic N10 Tower Is A Perfect Solution

Classic N10 – 5                                                                                                                     WC Blog 401
Bug Tag -4


Maintaining Space In Medical Facility Halls And Doorways Does Not Mean Electronic Article Surveillance Protection Is Out Of The Question; The Classic N10 Tower Is A Perfect Solution

     In the past year I have been in hospitals and doctors offices far more than I would like. In some of those cases the hallways had ample room for gurneys and staff to rush by me as I walked to the rooms I was visiting. Admittedly when I heard the quick pace of feet and clatter of wheels, whether there was enough room or not, I found myself stepping against the wall. Instinctively I knew that if that was my loved one I would want them to get through to surgery as quickly as possible. Sometimes I would pass groups of doctors who were on their rounds reviewing notes on their i-Pads and tablets and discussing the patients they were ready to see or had just seen. In some cases this took place in the area of the nurse’s station and space was a little tighter. Again, being aware that they were busy I would make efforts to stay out of their way. As I reflect on those hospital and office visits I think about the activities that went on around me. Medical personnel with new technology in hand, life-saving equipment lining hallways, professional medical care givers moving patients in and out of rooms and down those same halls. It can start to feel a bit claustrophobic. Putting on my Loss Prevention hat I thought about all of these factors and what if questions. What if there is Tablet theft of those medical tablets? What if an electronic article surveillance (EAS) system could be installed to prevent i-Pad theft? Would there be room for the necessary EAS towers like the Checkpoint Classic N10?

     In order to proceed with the answers to my questions it is only proper to explain what the Bug Tag and the Classic N10 are. The Tag is simply an anti-theft device that is stuck to a computer tablet and it interacts with an EAS tower. If a tagged mobile medical device is carried too close to a tower the tower alarm sounds a loud beeping noise and lights in the tower flash, alerting nearby employees someone is trying to walk out with a mobile device. If someone is trying to steal a medical tablet by tampering with a Bug Tag, an internal tag alarm sounds also alerting personnel of an attempted theft. The Classic N10 is an EAS tower specifically designed to fit smaller entryways and hallways. They don’t take up the same amount of space a traditional tower takes up. This allows ease of access even if something is being rushed through a hall or doorway such as a patient on a gurney or nurse rushing through a door with a crash cart. These towers won’t interfere with personnel or equipment.

     It was only recently that I learned there is an organization that focuses on hospital space standards. The American Society for Healthcare Engineering looks at hospitals and issues related to effective building designs. In an article on their website, “ICC Considers Changing Corridor Width Rules to Reflect Shift from Life Safety Concerns”, by Deanna Martin, ASHE senior communications specialist, discussed the rules and regulations regarding hospital hallway widths. She mentions diverse views on whether the width requirements take into consideration equipment such as crash carts and whether they count against those measurements. Regardless of what the regulations may or may not say concerning medical facility halls, you can easily see how setting up a Classic N10 tower would take up a smaller amount of space and still accommodate the needs of complying with ICC codes. 

     Medical tablets and i-Pads would be protected from theft and the potential for compromised patient information since they would have a Bug Tag. Doorways and Hallways where you would want to keep mobile devices restricted to could be protected with EAS.

     Keep patient data safe on mobile devices and keep lives safe with open corridors at the same time. Use a Bug Tag on tablets and Classic N10 towers in halls and doors. See how effective an EAS system can be for your medical facility.
For more information about Classic N10 contact us or call 1.866.914.2567.

In the past year I have been in hospitals and doctors offices far more than I would like. In some of those cases the hallways had ample room for gurneys and staff to rush by me as I walked to the rooms I was visiting. Admittedly when I heard the quick pace of feet and clatter of wheels, whether there was enough room or not, I found myself stepping against the wall. Instinctively I knew that if that was my loved one I would want them to get through to surgery as quickly as possible. Sometimes I would pass groups of doctors who were on their rounds reviewing notes on their i-Pads and tablets and discussing the patients they were ready to see or had just seen. In some cases this took place in the area of the nurse’s station and space was a little tighter. Again, being aware that they were busy I would make efforts to stay out of their way. As I reflect on those hospital and office visits I think about the activities that went on around me. Medical personnel with new technology in hand, life-saving equipment lining hallways, professional medical care givers moving patients in and out of rooms and down those same halls. It can start to feel a bit claustrophobic. Putting on my Loss Prevention hat I thought about all of these factors and what if questions. What if there is Tablet theft of those medical tablets? What if an electronic article surveillance (EAS) system could be installed to prevent i-Pad theft? Would there be room for the necessary EAS towers like the Checkpoint Classic N10?
     

In order to proceed with the answers to my questions it is only proper to explain what the Bug Tag and the Classic N10 are. The Tag is simply an anti-theft device that is stuck to a computer tablet and it interacts with an EAS tower. If a tagged mobile medical device is carried too close to a tower the tower alarm sounds a loud beeping noise and lights in the tower flash, alerting nearby employees someone is trying to walk out with a mobile device. If someone is trying to steal a medical tablet by tampering with a Bug Tag, an internal tag alarm sounds also alerting personnel of an attempted theft. The Classic N10 is an EAS tower specifically designed to fit smaller entryways and hallways. They don’t take up the same amount of space a traditional tower takes up. This allows ease of access even if something is being rushed through a hall or doorway such as a patient on a gurney or nurse rushing through a door with a crash cart. These towers won’t interfere with personnel or equipment.
     

It was only recently that I learned there is an organization that focuses on hospital space standards. The American Society for Healthcare Engineering looks at hospitals and issues related to effective building designs. In an article on their website, “ICC Considers Changing Corridor Width Rules to Reflect Shift from Life Safety Concerns”, by Deanna Martin, ASHE senior communications specialist, discussed the rules and regulations regarding hospital hallway widths. She mentions diverse views on whether the width requirements take into consideration equipment such as crash carts and whether they count against those measurements. Regardless of what the regulations may or may not say concerning medical facility halls, you can easily see how setting up a Classic N10 tower would take up a smaller amount of space and still accommodate the needs of complying with ICC codes. 
     

Medical tablets and i-Pads would be protected from theft and the potential for compromised patient information since they would have a Bug Tag. Doorways and Hallways where you would want to keep mobile devices restricted to could be protected with EAS towers.

 

 Keep patient data safe on mobile devices and keep lives safe with open corridors at the same time. Use a Bug Tag on tablets and Classic N10 towers in halls and doors. See how effective an EAS system can be for your medical facility.

 

For more information about Classic N10 contact us or call 1.866.914.2567.