tablet theft

Enhance Patient Data Security With A Bug Tag

iPad theft – 3                                                                                                                       WC Blog 551
Bug Tag-5

Enhance Patient Data Security With A Bug Tag

     The problem of patient medical information being stolen is not going away any time soon nor is the threat of medical iPad theft.  As an example in a Jan. 3, 2018 article in beckershospitalreview.com by Julie Spitzer, “Stolen computer at Penn Medicine compromises 1k patient records”, the writer says, “Philadelphia-based Penn Medicine mailed letters to roughly 1,000 patients, alerting them to a potential compromise of their personal information after an unencrypted laptop was stolen from the hospital…” The facility claimed that credit card, bank account information and social security numbers were not included in the computer but other patient data was. The solutions many medical institutions want to implement are stricter encryption and security password implementation to prevent potential hacking should a device be stolen. The team at Loss Prevention Systems Inc. has a better means of protecting against iPad theft and medical tablet theft and that is the use of a Bug Tag on all devices.

     The Bug Tag uses electronic article surveillance (EAS) technology working with Checkpoint pedestals to create a virtual electronic barrier to theft. The tag emits a constant radio frequency signal. When that signal is detected by a Checkpoint pedestal a sound is activated that is so loud that in a big box retail store it can be heard from one end of the building to the other. LED lights in pedestals flash drawing more attention to an attempted breach (it also alerts someone who may be hearing impaired that a tagged device is being removed from the building). When an alarm is set off employees respond to the exit and retrieve the device from the offending party. What if the thief runs out after an alarm? Use the 3-alarm Bug Tag and an internal alarm in the tag activates and the criminal can be picked out in a crowd. What if someone just pulls a tag off and then steals the iPad? No problem. The same internal alarm activates if the tag is tampered with and employees respond to the sound of the alarm and recover the unit. As a Loss Prevention Manager I saw the effectiveness of Checkpoint pedestals and how the alarms saved untold thousands of dollars in merchandise in my store. That same protection can keep mobile medical devices in a medical facility.

     The concern over continued medical device theft and data breaches is extensive enough that a story in delawareonline.com Dec 18, 2017 by Meredith Newman, “Delaware doctors, hospitals increase security as medical data breaches continue nationwide” said that the Delaware Health Information Network “…recently hired a privacy and security compliance manager whose sole job is to monitor the safety of patient data and address any concerns that might come up.” The story also reported that there is insurance medical providers can purchase to cover data breaches and these policies can include prebreach and postbreach services! I understand the importance of protecting yourself against lawsuits but when you have to talk about PREBREACH coverage something seems very out of whack to me.

     Encrypting of devices and using strong password protection is important to keep hackers out but the bigger issue is the loss and theft of devices. Many of these mobile computers and handheld devices are being taken home and leaving the security of the building. Use dedicated devices that are held in the building and protect them with a Bug Tag. It might be a bit inconvenient to have to check a device in and out at the beginning and end of the day but the risk of leaving it where it could be stolen is a bigger concern. Many of the HIPPA violations involving data breaches that are reported to the Department of Health and Human Services are caused by computers that have been stolen from cars or homes when taken home. Wouldn’t it make more sense to keep them in a building and protected with anti-theft devices?

      Medical computer tablet theft and iPad theft are happening on a regular basis. As more and more healthcare providers become reliant on electronic resources and digital documentation it is important that patient information is a priority. Use all of the security resources that are available to you and that includes securing the devices you rely on to do your work. Use the Bug Tag and stop criminals before they can spirit a device out of your building.
Get more information on a Bug Tag, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.  

The problem of patient medical information being stolen is not going away any time soon nor is the threat of medical iPad theft.  As an example in a Jan. 3, 2018 article in beckershospitalreview.com by Julie Spitzer, “Stolen computer at Penn Medicine compromises 1k patient records”, the writer says, “Philadelphia-based Penn Medicine mailed letters to roughly 1,000 patients, alerting them to a potential compromise of their personal information after an unencrypted laptop was stolen from the hospital…” The facility claimed that credit card, bank account information and social security numbers were not included in the computer but other patient data was. The solutions many medical institutions want to implement are stricter encryption and security password implementation to prevent potential hacking should a device be stolen. The team at Loss Prevention Systems Inc. has a better means of protecting against iPad theft and medical tablet theft and that is the use of a Bug Tag on all devices.
     

The Bug Tag uses electronic article surveillance (EAS) technology working with EAS pedestals to create a virtual electronic barrier to theft. The tag emits a constant radio frequency signal. When that signal is detected by a EAS pedestal a sound is activated that is so loud that in a big box retail store it can be heard from one end of the building to the other. LED lights in pedestals flash drawing more attention to an attempted breach (it also alerts someone who may be hearing impaired that a tagged device is being removed from the building). When an alarm is set off employees respond to the exit and retrieve the device from the offending party. What if the thief runs out after an alarm? Use the 3-alarm Bug Tag and an internal alarm in the tag activates and the criminal can be picked out in a crowd. What if someone just pulls a tag off and then steals the iPad? No problem. The same internal alarm activates if the tag is tampered with and employees respond to the sound of the alarm and recover the unit. As a Loss Prevention Manager I saw the effectiveness of EAS pedestals and how the alarms saved untold thousands of dollars in merchandise in my store. That same protection can keep mobile medical devices in a medical facility.
     

The concern over continued medical device theft and data breaches is extensive enough that a story in delawareonline.com Dec 18, 2017 by Meredith Newman, “Delaware doctors, hospitals increase security as medical data breaches continue nationwide” said that the Delaware Health Information Network “…recently hired a privacy and security compliance manager whose sole job is to monitor the safety of patient data and address any concerns that might come up.” The story also reported that there is insurance medical providers can purchase to cover data breaches and these policies can include prebreach and postbreach services! I understand the importance of protecting yourself against lawsuits but when you have to talk about PREBREACH coverage something seems very out of whack to me.
     

Encrypting of devices and using strong password protection is important to keep hackers out but the bigger issue is the loss and theft of devices. Many of these mobile computers and handheld devices are being taken home and leaving the security of the building. Use dedicated devices that are held in the building and protect them with a Bug Tag. It might be a bit inconvenient to have to check a device in and out at the beginning and end of the day but the risk of leaving it where it could be stolen is a bigger concern. Many of the HIPPA violations involving data breaches that are reported to the Department of Health and Human Services are caused by computers that have been stolen from cars or homes when taken home. Wouldn’t it make more sense to keep them in a building and protected with anti-theft devices?
     

Medical computer tablet theft and iPad theft are happening on a regular basis. As more and more healthcare providers become reliant on electronic resources and digital documentation it is important that patient information is a priority. Use all of the security resources that are available to you and that includes securing the devices you rely on to do your work. Use the Bug Tag and stop criminals before they can spirit a device out of your building.

 

Get more information on a Bug Tag, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.  

Take A Balanced Approach To Prevent Medical Tablet Theft

Tablet Theft-5                                                                                                                             WC Blog 514
i-Pad Theft-3
Bug Tag-4


Take A Balanced Approach To Prevent Medical Tablet Theft

     Computer tablet theft and iPad theft in hospitals are an increasing threat as the use of personal hand-held computers grows more prevalent in the medical field. There are new applications for computer tablets to improve the care of patients on a regular basis. I recently came across a new use for computer tablets that aids in the prevention of fall accidents in hospitals. This new technology involves special socks with sensors in them that monitor the movements of a patient. In a story from Cincinnati.com, Dec. 8, 2017 by Anne Saker, titled “How can we prevent falls? Hospitals could find an answer in Cinc-designed ‘smart’ socks”, Ms. Saker reports on a patient in a Madison County hospital. The patient was wearing a pair of Palarum socks, “made by the renowned French textile company Perrin” designed to help prevent patient falls before they can happen. The socks have sensors in them that can send a signal to a nurse monitoring the patient who is wearing the socks. “Using a Palarum tablet computer in a patient room or at a main desk, a nurse tells the monitor about the patient, including weight…When the socks detect downward pressure past a certain threshold, the filaments in the fabric signal the monitor on the sock. The wireless alarm goes out to the three nurses closest to the patient.”     https://www.cincinnati.com/story/news/2017/12/08/how-can-we-prevent-falls-hospitals-find-answer-cincinnati-designed-smart-socks/904983001/
Sensor socks and a computer tablet that can save patients from potential falls, that is incredible! I hope you noticed as I did when reading the article, the nurse tells the monitor about the patient. That means private patient data is in these computers and therein lies to risks associated with mobile device theft and i-Pad theft in hospitals. Bill Bregar, the CEO of Loss Prevention Systems Inc. (LPSI) recognizes the dangers associated with computer theft from medical facilities of all types and has an answer for them with the Bug Tag.

     A simple design, the Bug Tag is a small device that uses electronic article surveillance (EAS) technology to prevent theft. The tag is attached directly to the back of a mobile computing device with an adhesive sled. The facility has EAS pedestals installed at all entrances and exits (and even outside of restrooms if so desired) and in the event of an attempted tablet theft the Bug Tag sends out a signal that sets off alarms in the pedestals before the perpetrator even gets to the door to walk out. The lights and alarms of the pedestals alert employees who respond and recover the tablet or i-Pad. Concerned that a criminal could just remove a tag from a unit and still commit i-Pad theft? No need to worry, the tags have tamper alarms built in that will sound their own warning if a criminal tried to pull one off of a device. The wonderful part about the use of these anti-theft devices is that they allow for total freedom of movement within a facility for care providers they just keep the devices from being taken out.

     There a readers who may be scoffing at the idea that a tablet theft is really all that big a deal. Most hospitals and clinics are going to encrypt their devices, right? Besides, we are talking about socks here, how much information can a criminal get other than a patient’s shoe size? There are several things readers should consider. First, we are only addressing one use of mobile devices in the medical field here. The proliferation of handheld computers is enormous in medicine. They are being used by doctors to video conference to remote locals to aid in treatment of patients. They are being used by doctors and nurses to check on patients rather than carrying the old charts around. It wasn’t long ago I was in a hospital emergency room and the doctors were doing rounds with interns carrying i-Pads or tablets and discussing patient statuses. I have signed into a waiting room at a care clinic on an i-Pad rather than registering with the old forms. All of that patient information becomes available to criminals when a tablet theft or i-pad theft takes place. If encryption were a cure all then I would ask the skeptics, why does DHHS levy severe fines on medical facilities that have mobile and computer devices stolen? Would it be necessary to penalize if there were no risk of patient data loss?

        Whether it is protecting a patient using special balance socks and a computing device or any other medical computer using a Bug Tag is a step in the right direction. Let LPSI help you get started in preventing tablet theft with EAS pedestals and tags.
Get more information on a Bug Tag, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.

Computer tablet theft and iPad theft in hospitals are an increasing threat as the use of personal hand-held computers grows more prevalent in the medical field. There are new applications for computer tablets to improve the care of patients on a regular basis. I recently came across a new use for computer tablets that aids in the prevention of fall accidents in hospitals. This new technology involves special socks with sensors in them that monitor the movements of a patient. In a story from Cincinnati.com, Dec. 8, 2017 by Anne Saker, titled “How can we prevent falls? Hospitals could find an answer in Cinc-designed ‘smart’ socks”, Ms. Saker reports on a patient in a Madison County hospital. The patient was wearing a pair of Palarum socks, “made by the renowned French textile company Perrin” designed to help prevent patient falls before they can happen. The socks have sensors in them that can send a signal to a nurse monitoring the patient who is wearing the socks. “Using a Palarum tablet computer in a patient room or at a main desk, a nurse tells the monitor about the patient, including weight…When the socks detect downward pressure past a certain threshold, the filaments in the fabric signal the monitor on the sock. The wireless alarm goes out to the three nurses closest to the patient.”     https://www.cincinnati.com/story/news/2017/12/08/how-can-we-prevent-falls-hospitals-find-answer-cincinnati-designed-smart-socks/904983001/Sensor socks and a computer tablet that can save patients from potential falls, that is incredible! I hope you noticed as I did when reading the article, the nurse tells the monitor about the patient. That means private patient data is in these computers and therein lies to risks associated with mobile device theft and i-Pad theft in hospitals. Bill Bregar, the CEO of Loss Prevention Systems Inc. (LPSI) recognizes the dangers associated with computer theft from medical facilities of all types and has an answer for them with the Bug Tag.
     

A simple design, the Bug Tag is a small device that uses electronic article surveillance (EAS) technology to prevent theft. The tag is attached directly to the back of a mobile computing device with an adhesive sled. The facility has EAS pedestals installed at all entrances and exits (and even outside of restrooms if so desired) and in the event of an attempted tablet theft the Bug Tag sends out a signal that sets off alarms in the pedestals before the perpetrator even gets to the door to walk out. The lights and alarms of the pedestals alert employees who respond and recover the tablet or i-Pad. Concerned that a criminal could just remove a tag from a unit and still commit i-Pad theft? No need to worry, the tags have tamper alarms built in that will sound their own warning if a criminal tried to pull one off of a device. The wonderful part about the use of these anti-theft devices is that they allow for total freedom of movement within a facility for care providers they just keep the devices from being taken out.
     

There a readers who may be scoffing at the idea that a tablet theft is really all that big a deal. Most hospitals and clinics are going to encrypt their devices, right? Besides, we are talking about socks here, how much information can a criminal get other than a patient’s shoe size? There are several things readers should consider. First, we are only addressing one use of mobile devices in the medical field here. The proliferation of handheld computers is enormous in medicine. They are being used by doctors to video conference to remote locals to aid in treatment of patients. They are being used by doctors and nurses to check on patients rather than carrying the old charts around. It wasn’t long ago I was in a hospital emergency room and the doctors were doing rounds with interns carrying i-Pads or tablets and discussing patient statuses. I have signed into a waiting room at a care clinic on an i-Pad rather than registering with the old forms. All of that patient information becomes available to criminals when a tablet theft or i-pad theft takes place. If encryption were a cure all then I would ask the skeptics, why does DHHS levy severe fines on medical facilities that have mobile and computer devices stolen? Would it be necessary to penalize if there were no risk of patient data loss?
       

Whether it is protecting a patient using special balance socks and a computing device or any other medical computer using a Bug Tag is a step in the right direction. Let LPSI help you get started in preventing tablet theft with EAS pedestals and tags.


Get more information on a Bug Tag, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.

A Bug Tag Provides Protection Against Medical Computer Tablet Theft

 

Tablet Theft-4                                                                                                 WC Blog 477
Bug Tag-4
A Bug Tag Provides Protection Against Medical Computer Tablet Theft
Tablet theft from hospitals is a concern that cannot be overstated. The issues that surround a stolen computer, tablet or iPad involve the compromise of patient information. We see in the news that corporate giants lose customer information and we worry about the personal information that is exposed to the hackers. I think about the Equifax data breach that put the information of nearly 14.5 million people at risk. This follows a long list of other businesses that were violated in recent years. When a hospital or medical facility loses patient data a lot more can be at stake. Personal information becomes available, medical history, patient billing information and payment information are just a few of the things that can be targeted by hackers. Desktop computers have been replaced with laptops and in many institutions laptops have been replaced with medical computer tablets and iPads. Trying to protect against tablet theft is much different than trying to protect a desktop computer from being stolen. There is a way to stop thieves and it requires protecting devices with a Bug Tag.
     A Bug Tag is a small anti-theft device that is stuck on a tablet or iPad by sticking the adhesive back of the tag to the device. Buildings that use electronic article surveillance pedestals at doors are able to detect protected devices if carried near the exits. In the event a tagged tablet or iPad is in the range of the pedestals a loud, beeping sound resonates through the building. Workers respond to the alarm and recover the computers before they leave the building. Concerned about someone tampering with the Bug Tag? No need to worry, the tags have tamper mechanisms that activate an internal alarm if someone tries to pry a tag off. Again, employees alerted to the noise respond and prevent a theft from taking place.
     
     Is there really a possibility that a tablet that a tablet theft could occur at a hospital? In a recent article in abc15.com, Aug 1, 2017, by Joe Enea, “PD: Man slept in Phoenix hospital basement, robs them of computers”, the article reports that, “A man was caught stealing multiple laptops and large televisions from a Phoenix hospital last month.” The story reported how the subject had been sleeping in the hospital basement and sneaking laptop computers out of the hospital and then selling them. http://www.abc15.com/news/crime/pd-man-sleeping-in-phoenix-hospital-basement-robs-them-of-computers  Something that stood out to me about the story is there was no mention about what happened to any information stored on those computers. What information was on those computers and could someone hack into them and obtain patient data? It also occurred to me that with the transition in many hospitals from laptops to computer tablets and tablets are so much smaller than laptops. How much easier a tablet theft would have been if they were used in this particular building?
     You may be thinking this is an isolated case and chances are that even if a computer or tablet were stolen from a medical provider the encryption or security measures would prevent loss of data. You might want to rethink that. In another recent story, dated March 3, 2017, in the Times of San Diego, by Cassia Pollock, “Data of 750 Patients Compromised by Computer Theft at Sharp Healthcare”, the article discusses the possibility that someone may have access to the records of 750 outpatients due to the theft of a computer. What kind of information could someone possibly gain from this computer? “Each study record may have included patient name, date of birth, age, current medications, family history and a summary of studies performed.”  https://timesofsandiego.com/crime/2017/03/03/data-of-750-patients-breached-in-computer-theft-at-sharp-healthcare/  it should give us cause for concern the next time we visit a healthcare provider.
     Obviously we have to give out our information in order to be seen by doctors, nurses and even pharmacists. We do have the right to expect they will take care of our personal information since they are requiring it of us. It is important then that medical centers, hospitals, clinics and any other facility with access to patient information takes necessary precautions to prevent the theft of portable and mobile devices such as iPads and tablets. Use the Bug Tag on each device and electronic article surveillance pedestals at all entrances/exits to keep hardware from leaving the building. The confidence instilled in your patients will keep them returning again and again.
For more information on Tablet Theft contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.
     

Tablet theft from hospitals is a concern that cannot be overstated. The issues that surround a stolen computer, tablet or iPad involve the compromise of patient information. We see in the news that corporate giants lose customer information and we worry about the personal information that is exposed to the hackers. I think about the Equifax data breach that put the information of nearly 14.5 million people at risk. This follows a long list of other businesses that were violated in recent years. When a hospital or medical facility loses patient data a lot more can be at stake. Personal information becomes available, medical history, patient billing information and payment information are just a few of the things that can be targeted by hackers. Desktop computers have been replaced with laptops and in many institutions laptops have been replaced with medical computer tablets and iPads. Trying to protect against tablet theft is much different than trying to protect a desktop computer from being stolen. There is a way to stop thieves and it requires protecting devices with a Bug Tag.

A Bug Tag is a small anti-theft device that is stuck on a tablet or iPad by sticking the adhesive back of the tag to the device. Buildings that use electronic article surveillance pedestals at doors are able to detect protected devices if carried near the exits. In the event a tagged tablet or iPad is in the range of the pedestals a loud, beeping sound resonates through the building. Workers respond to the alarm and recover the computers before they leave the building. Concerned about someone tampering with the Bug Tag? No need to worry, the tags have tamper mechanisms that activate an internal alarm if someone tries to pry a tag off. Again, employees alerted to the noise respond and prevent a theft from taking place.          

 

Is there really a possibility that a tablet that a tablet theft could occur at a hospital? In a recent article in abc15.com, Aug 1, 2017, by Joe Enea, “PD: Man slept in Phoenix hospital basement, robs them of computers”, the article reports that, “A man was caught stealing multiple laptops and large televisions from a Phoenix hospital last month.” The story reported how the subject had been sleeping in the hospital basement and sneaking laptop computers out of the hospital and then selling them. http://www.abc15.com/news/crime/pd-man-sleeping-in-phoenix-hospital-basement-robs-them-of-computers.  Something that stood out to me about the story is there was no mention about what happened to any information stored on those computers. What information was on those computers and could someone hack into them and obtain patient data? It also occurred to me that with the transition in many hospitals from laptops to computer tablets and tablets are so much smaller than laptops. How much easier a tablet theft would have been if they were used in this particular building?

 

You may be thinking this is an isolated case and chances are that even if a computer or tablet were stolen from a medical provider the encryption or security measures would prevent loss of data. You might want to rethink that. In another recent story, dated March 3, 2017, in the Times of San Diego, by Cassia Pollock, “Data of 750 Patients Compromised by Computer Theft at Sharp Healthcare”, the article discusses the possibility that someone may have access to the records of 750 outpatients due to the theft of a computer. What kind of information could someone possibly gain from this computer? “Each study record may have included patient name, date of birth, age, current medications, family history and a summary of studies performed.”  https://timesofsandiego.com/crime/2017/03/03/data-of-750-patients-breached-in-computer-theft-at-sharp-healthcare/  it should give us cause for concern the next time we visit a healthcare provider.

Obviously we have to give out our information in order to be seen by doctors, nurses and even pharmacists. We do have the right to expect they will take care of our personal information since they are requiring it of us. It is important then that medical centers, hospitals, clinics and any other facility with access to patient information takes necessary precautions to prevent the theft of portable and mobile devices such as iPads and tablets. Use the Bug Tag on each device and electronic article surveillance pedestals at all entrances/exits to keep hardware from leaving the building. The confidence instilled in your patients will keep them returning again and again.

 

For more information on Tablet Theft, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.