Could Eye Wear Sales Increase Due To Technology? If So, Theft Will Increase Too Unless You Use An Eyewear Tag On Glasses You Sell

Since I spend much of my time on a computer at work and writing I started to think about the potential impact it could be having on my eyesight. I have always had very good vision but I have noticed in recent months that I have been experiencing a little more difficulty in reading books in low light. It has not always been this way for me. I am thinking it is related to my time on the computer, my wife says I’m just getting old but I KNOW that can’t be true. It did make me begin to wonder if there was a correlation between the use of technology and eyesight especially with all the people on smart phones, tablets and computers today. As I bounced this around in my head it also dawned on me that there a lot of small children that are using everything from tablets to smart phones. Could this be causing eyesight problems for children before they enter their teenage years? If so, could the eyewear industry see an increase in sales due to increased uses of computer/phone technology? My last question is for eyewear stores, if there is an increase are you ready to prevent shoplifting of your merchandise because increased patronage could mean increased theft?

 

Theft is always a concern for retailers but those that fail to take steps to prevent shoplifting often experience increased merchandise shortage at inventory time. Increased shortage means less profit and a decline in sales because merchandise can’t be kept in stock to sell to paying customers. By using retail anti-theft devices on goods, merchandise theft can be greatly curtailed if not stopped completely. Specialty stores like an eyewear retail shop can use an eyewear tag on glasses to stop pilferage. An eyewear tag is an electronic article surveillance (EAS), retail anti-theft device that is attached to the arm of a pair of glasses. The tag will cause an EAS tower to sound an alarm and lights will flash if glasses with a tag on them are carried close to the doors. Alarm activations result in store employees responding to the doors and conducting receipt checks and recovering unpaid products. They also result in bad guys dropping merchandise and running. One other benefit of the tag is that it deters criminals from stealing in the first place. The tag can only be removed with a special detachment key and if someone tries to pry it off at minimum the arm will break off if the whole frame doesn’t fall apart.

 

Do our eyes get damaged from the use of technology? According to an article on the American Optometric Association website titled, “The 21st century child: Increased Technology Use May Lead To Future Eye Health And Vision Issues”, posted July 28, 2015, “ Today’s electronic devices, also give off high-energy, short-wave, blue and violet light, which may affect vision and even prematurely age the eyes. Early research shows that overexposure to blue light could contribute to eye strain and discomfort and may lead to serious conditions later in life such as age- related macular degeneration (AMD), which can cause blindness.” (Italics and underlining are mine for emphasis) http://www.aoa.org/newsroom/the-21st-century-child-increased-technology-use-may-lead-to-future-eye-health-and-vision-issues?sso=y . The story goes on to report that Optometrists are watching new research on the subject. If the initial concerns on the subject prove to be true then it could be I am experiencing some of my sight issues to technology use. The larger issue is that there should be more concern for the children who are growing up in an age where 5 year olds are smarter than I am when it comes to smart phones. They are constantly in front of these devices and it is not unreasonable to suspect we will see the increase in eyeglass wear as I suggested at the beginning of the article.

 

Optical store owners get ready sales could be growing at an exponential rate as the effect of technology start to take their toll on so many of our young adults. I hope the studies do not play out and children do not suffer ill-effects. If however you see me or more of my peers in the near future, prepare now to prevent shoplifting by using retail anti-theft devices because not everyone that enters your store is going to be honest. Use an eyewear tag on all of your glasses and you will continue to see black ink on that bottom line.

 

Need information on eyewear tag? Give us a call at 1.866.914.2567 now.

 

 

Pet Stores Profits Are On The Rise But Shoplifting Is Too – Prevent The Pilfering Of Puppy Apparel With Clothing Security Tags

 

Checkpoint Tags-4                                                                                                                   WC Blog 438
Clothing Security Tags-3
Pet Stores Profits Are On The Rise But Shoplifting Is Too – Prevent The Pilfering Of Puppy Apparel With Clothing Security Tags
     Pets, we love them in the U.S. in fact we love them so much that according to SAGE Business Researcher in an article titled, “The Pet Industry”, by Janice Arenofsky, February 27, 2017, the writer states, “Spending on pets in the United States continued to increase even through the 2007-2009 recession and hit an estimated $62.75 billion in 2016.” http://businessresearcher.sagepub.com/sbr-1863-102160-2772364/20170227/the-pet-industry That is quite a sum of money to spend on our furry (and sometimes not-so-furry for all you reptile, bird and insect lovers) friends. Many employers even offer pet insurance now (it is offered at the locations where I work). Where it once was taboo to bring a pet into a store it has now become commonplace. I see them in pet carriers, sometimes on leashes and occasionally I have seen them in baby strollers (at least I hope that was a dog otherwise there are some really ugly babies with wet noses out there). Relax, I’m just kidding folks. I tried to get some facts on how much Americans spend on pet clothing alone but I was unable to locate that information. What I was able to find was in a 2016 article, “Last Year, the NRF (National Retail Federation) estimated that $350 million was spent on pet costumes…” according to a cnbc.com article, “More consumers are purchasing pet costumes for Halloween than ever before”, by Sarah Whitten, 29 Oct 2016. If we are spending more than $350 million for pet costumes you can imagine how much we are spending for pet clothing overall. How do retailers protect their pet clothes? Why not protect them like we protect human clothing? Clothing security tags don’t have to be on human clothes only. 
     When I’m discussing clothing security tags, I’m referring to Checkpoint tags specifically. These devices are designed to prevent shoplifting through deterrence and the use of electronic article surveillance (EAS) technology. The way the tags work is they are designed so that they transmit a radio wave of a specific frequency. EAS pedestals located near key points in a building such as entrances and exits detect this specific radio frequency. When a tagged item is carried too close to the detection field the pedestals have alarms that are triggered. Store workers respond to those alarms, conduct receipt checks and recover unpaid merchandise. Checkpoint tags also deter shoplifters because they are designed to be visible and it is apparent they could very well damage merchandise if pried at or tampered with. Many professional shoplifters already know what the tags are when they see them and prefer to find products that don’t appear to be protected.
     So exactly how much do pet clothes run? One major pet retailer sells an “anxiety shirt” for $39.95 and sports team jerseys for up to $28.99. An online designer pet boutique store advertises a doggie hoodie for $64.99. I don’t spend $64.99 on a winter coat for me! The fact remains there are folks who will spend that kind of money to dress up a pet that already comes with a fur coat of its own. For traditional stores that carry these lines of merchandise it only makes sense that the merchandise should be protected from theft with clothing security tags. 
     Checkpoint tags can be applied to these clothing items in the same way they are attached to human clothes. The only difference is that the garments are smaller in size so the tags may appear to be bigger but the protection given is just as robust. Tiny clothing items stuffed in a purse will activate an EAS pedestal just as they would activate it if they were human clothes shoved into the same purse. While you are putting clothing security tags on doggie outerwear you should know you can use the same tags to protect other merchandise that may be of high value such as pet beds, collars and leashes. Shoplifting is made more difficult when merchants protect as many items as possible.
     Pets and pet accessories are big business. Where there is a store making a profit there will be shoplifters to pilfer. Prevent petty (and not so petty) theft by using Checkpoint tags on your pet softlines goods.
For more information about clothing security tags contact us or call 1.866.914.2567.

Pets, we love them in the U.S. in fact we love them so much that according to SAGE Business Researcher in an article titled, “The Pet Industry”, by Janice Arenofsky, February 27, 2017, the writer states, “Spending on pets in the United States continued to increase even through the 2007-2009 recession and hit an estimated $62.75 billion in 2016.” http://businessresearcher.sagepub.com/sbr-1863-102160-2772364/20170227/the-pet-industry That is quite a sum of money to spend on our furry (and sometimes not-so-furry for all you reptile, bird and insect lovers) friends. Many employers even offer pet insurance now (it is offered at the locations where I work). Where it once was taboo to bring a pet into a store it has now become commonplace. I see them in pet carriers, sometimes on leashes and occasionally I have seen them in baby strollers (at least I hope that was a dog otherwise there are some really ugly babies with wet noses out there). Relax, I’m just kidding folks. I tried to get some facts on how much Americans spend on pet clothing alone but I was unable to locate that information. What I was able to find was in a 2016 article, “Last Year, the NRF (National Retail Federation) estimated that $350 million was spent on pet costumes…” according to a cnbc.com article, “More consumers are purchasing pet costumes for Halloween than ever before”, by Sarah Whitten, 29 Oct 2016. If we are spending more than $350 million for pet costumes you can imagine how much we are spending for pet clothing overall. How do retailers protect their pet clothes? Why not protect them like we protect human clothing? Clothing security tags don’t have to be on human clothes only. 

When I’m discussing clothing security tags, I’m referring to Checkpoint tags specifically. These devices are designed to prevent shoplifting through deterrence and the use of electronic article surveillance (EAS) technology. The way the tags work is they are designed so that they transmit a radio wave of a specific frequency. EAS pedestals located near key points in a building such as entrances and exits detect this specific radio frequency. When a tagged item is carried too close to the detection field the pedestals have alarms that are triggered. Store workers respond to those alarms, conduct receipt checks and recover unpaid merchandise. Checkpoint tags also deter shoplifters because they are designed to be visible and it is apparent they could very well damage merchandise if pried at or tampered with. Many professional shoplifters already know what the tags are when they see them and prefer to find products that don’t appear to be protected.

So exactly how much do pet clothes run? One major pet retailer sells an “anxiety shirt” for $39.95 and sports team jerseys for up to $28.99. An online designer pet boutique store advertises a doggie hoodie for $64.99. I don’t spend $64.99 on a winter coat for me! The fact remains there are folks who will spend that kind of money to dress up a pet that already comes with a fur coat of its own. For traditional stores that carry these lines of merchandise it only makes sense that the merchandise should be protected from theft with clothing security tags. 

Checkpoint tags can be applied to these clothing items in the same way they are attached to human clothes. The only difference is that the garments are smaller in size so the tags may appear to be bigger but the protection given is just as robust. Tiny clothing items stuffed in a purse will activate an EAS pedestal just as they would activate it if they were human clothes shoved into the same purse. While you are putting clothing security tags on doggie outerwear you should know you can use the same tags to protect other merchandise that may be of high value such as pet beds, collars and leashes. Shoplifting is made more difficult when merchants protect as many items as possible.

Pets and pet accessories are big business. Where there is a store making a profit there will be shoplifters to pilfer. Prevent petty (and not so petty) theft by using Checkpoint tags on your pet softlines goods.

 

For more information about clothing security tags contact us or call 1.866.914.2567.

 

 

One Size Doesn’t Fit All, Prevent Shoplifting In Your Store With The Alpha Tag That Works Best For Your Business

Prevent Shoplifting-4                                                                                                                  WC Blog 385
Alpha 2 Alarm-5
One Size Doesn’t Fit All, Prevent Shoplifting In Your Store With The Alpha Tag That Works Best For Your Business
     In my part-time employment I am a customer service associate in a store that sells computers, office supplies, printers and so forth. This past week I assisted a couple who were in the market for a printer. I asked if they had any specific brand in mind or features that they were looking for in their printer. The wife was very specific and told me she wanted a printer from a specific company that could print, copy and scan. I asked her about the types of documents she prints and whether she needed to print on both sides of a page very frequently. After learning her needs, I began to show her several models that would meet her requirements. She found two models that were similar but she had questions about why they were approximately $20 different in price. I explained the features of the upgraded model including a top feed tray for automatic two-sided printing, something she did not necessarily need although it would have provided some convenience to her. It also had a slightly larger display screen, again not a game changer for her but what did make a difference to my customer was the fact there was a USB port for a jump drive and a memory card slot. THOSE were features she could find a use for. She decided to purchase the slightly more expensive model because it would suit her purposes, not because it was just added bells and whistles. The same thing can be true for retailers in the market for retail anti-theft devices. If a store owner is going to invest in a system to prevent shoplifting do they need to purchase Alpha 2 Alarm tags or should they choose the Alpha 3 Alarm tag? That may depend on what the needs of their store(s) are.
     Alpha electronic article surveillance (EAS) tags are hard tags that can be pinned directly to an item, including clothing, bedding, towels, sheets, purses and so on. I have even seen them pinned through the plastic blister packaging of some hardlines merchandise. Tags are best used in stores that also have Checkpoint EAS towers at the doors. The EAS circuitry designed in the tags sends a signal to the towers if a protected piece of merchandise is brought into the area of the door where the tower is located. When the signal is picked up alarms in the tower activate and sound a loud noise and lights built in the towers flash. The alarm catches the attention of employees and they respond to recover merchandise being carried out the door. The Alpha 2 Alarm tag is the basic version of the device, having a built in alarm that sounds when someone decides to tamper with it or try to pry a tag off. It also sets off the alarm in the tower. The 3 Alarm tag has the addition of a built in alarm that activates if a crook gets outside the building. 
     This brings us back to the question of why someone might choose an Alpha 2 Alarm tag instead of the 3 Alarm.  A small retail store may have a very limited staff at any given time, perhaps even a manager working alone in the place. In the vast majority of cases retail anti-theft devices will prevent shoplifting but on occasion a shoplifter will take a risk and try to get past the doors with concealed goods. If a shoplifter scoots past the EAS towers and sets off the alarms in the towers, a manager or even a staff of two can’t risk stepping outside to see the thief’s direction of travel. It may be that there is little point in having the tags with the third alarm in that case. The Alpha 2 Alarm tag can meet the needs of these stores. For a larger store with enough staff to cover the front end and salesfloor, a manager could step outside the doors and using the third alarm to identify the thief, watch the direction he or she runs while calling the police. Please understand, you should NOT chase the shoplifter, simply watch from the front doors while on the phone with police if you know what was stolen.
     Prevent shoplifting with the right tools for your business. Decide if Alpha 2 Alarm tags will provide the protection you need or if you could use a step up to a 3 alarm tag. In either case just remember, some protection to prevent shoplifting is better than none at all.
Get more information on Alpha 2 Alarm, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.
  
       
     

In my part-time employment I am a customer service associate in a store that sells computers, office supplies, printers and so forth. This past week I assisted a couple who were in the market for a printer. I asked if they had any specific brand in mind or features that they were looking for in their printer. The wife was very specific and told me she wanted a printer from a specific company that could print, copy and scan. I asked her about the types of documents she prints and whether she needed to print on both sides of a page very frequently. After learning her needs, I began to show her several models that would meet her requirements. She found two models that were similar but she had questions about why they were approximately $20 different in price. I explained the features of the upgraded model including a top feed tray for automatic two-sided printing, something she did not necessarily need although it would have provided some convenience to her. It also had a slightly larger display screen, again not a game changer for her but what did make a difference to my customer was the fact there was a USB port for a jump drive and a memory card slot. THOSE were features she could find a use for. She decided to purchase the slightly more expensive model because it would suit her purposes, not because it was just added bells and whistles. The same thing can be true for retailers in the market for retail anti-theft devices. If a store owner is going to invest in a system to prevent shoplifting do they need to purchase Alpha 2 Alarm tags or should they choose the Alpha 3 Alarm tag? That may depend on what the needs of their store(s) are.

 

 Alpha electronic article surveillance (EAS) tags are hard tags that can be pinned directly to an item, including clothing, bedding, towels, sheets, purses and so on. I have even seen them pinned through the plastic blister packaging of some hardlines merchandise. Tags are best used in stores that also have Checkpoint EAS towers at the doors. The EAS circuitry designed in the tags sends a signal to the towers if a protected piece of merchandise is brought into the area of the door where the tower is located. When the signal is picked up alarms in the tower activate and sound a loud noise and lights built in the towers flash. The alarm catches the attention of employees and they respond to recover merchandise being carried out the door. The Alpha 2 Alarm tag is the basic version of the device, having a built in alarm that sounds when someone decides to tamper with it or try to pry a tag off. It also sets off the alarm in the tower. The 3 Alarm tag has the addition of a built in alarm that activates if a crook gets outside the building. 

     

This brings us back to the question of why someone might choose an Alpha 2 Alarm tag instead of the 3 Alarm.  A small retail store may have a very limited staff at any given time, perhaps even a manager working alone in the place. In the vast majority of cases retail anti-theft devices will prevent shoplifting but on occasion a shoplifter will take a risk and try to get past the doors with concealed goods. If a shoplifter scoots past the EAS towers and sets off the alarms in the towers, a manager or even a staff of two can’t risk stepping outside to see the thief’s direction of travel. It may be that there is little point in having the tags with the third alarm in that case. The Alpha 2 Alarm tag can meet the needs of these stores. For a larger store with enough staff to cover the front end and salesfloor, a manager could step outside the doors and using the third alarm to identify the thief, watch the direction he or she runs while calling the police. Please understand, you should NOT chase the shoplifter, simply watch from the front doors while on the phone with police if you know what was stolen.
     

Prevent shoplifting with the right tools for your business. Decide if Alpha 2 Alarm tags will provide the protection you need or if you could use a step up to a 3 alarm tag. In either case just remember, some protection to prevent shoplifting is better than none at all.

 

Get more information on Alpha 2 Alarm, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.