Protect Health And Beauty Products From Professional Crooks By Using Sensormatic Safers

Prevent Shoplifting – 3                                                                                                             WC Blog 847
protect health and beauty products – 4

Protect Health And Beauty Products From Professional Crooks By Using Sensormatic Safers

     How important is it for store owners to protect health and beauty products? How important is it to prevent all theft in your store? As I was searching for recent news on Organized Retail Crime (ORC) activity I came across a story that was a strong reminder of why it is important for merchants to prevent shoplifting. A professional shoplifting ring out of Florida was recently caught by police. They are accused of theft to the tune of over $2 million dollars in stolen goods! According to a story in clickorlando.com, May 08, 2018, “5 arrested 1 sought in Florida retail theft ring” the suspects were, “…hitting eight to 10 businesses each day.” This is an incredible amount of merchandise and it was not just one type of store being targeted. The group was hitting grocery stores, drug stores and department stores. The story related that Publix Loss Prevention started the investigation as the group was stealing primarily health and beauty products from their stores. Of course as the investigation by police went into full swing it was determined other chains were being hit by the group also. It turns out the ring was stealing clothes and shoes as well as teeth whitening strips, electric toothbrushes and razors. The goods were then sold on the black market.

     What are Organized Retail Theft (ORC) rings and is there a way to combat them? ORC groups are professional shoplifting groups. They can vary in the number of people who operate in a ring and they may even use people outside of the ring to actually do the shoplifting. What makes these groups different from the opportunist who enters a store and steals is that the opportunist may only do it as a prank or for a thrill. They may steal a lot over time but not in the quantities or dollars that professional groups will steal. ORC rings are reselling as a business. They may sell on the internet, out of a warehouse or use a “mom and pop” shop as a cover. They will steal anything they can get out of a store but they love to steal small merchandise that is easy to conceal. This is why it is so important to protect health and beauty products.

     So now you know what an ORC group is but how do you fight back against a group of criminals who may be working in teams or sending in others to steal for them? You prevent shoplifting by using Sensormatic Flexible Safers. Safers are tough, durable, locking bags with electronic article surveillance protection built into them. They add size and alarm protection to smaller pieces of merchandise that would otherwise be easy for shoplifters to steal in bulk quantities. How did the ORC group mentioned at the beginning of this article get away with hitting eight to 10 businesses a day? I would be willing to bet that in part they were avoiding merchandise that had electronic article surveillance protection as much as they possibly could. Professional shoplifters know that activating alarm towers with Flexible Safers or other Sensormatic tags is going to draw unwanted attention and make it difficult to go back to that store again. A store that uses anti-shoplifting devices to protect health and beauty products is one step ahead of the bad guys.

       It is important that I mention that Sensormatic Safers prevent shoplifting by the opportunist as much as the professional. This is especially true in the health and beauty product departments where so many of the items are pocketable. That means they are small enough to be slipped into a pocket and that is a difficult theft to see. I can tell you that we in the Loss Prevention field are very wary of stopping someone for stealing something as small as a cosmetic item. It is simply too risky and the chance of making a bad stop too great. We often let these people walk out unless they set off an electronic article surveillance alarm and then we leave it up to a store manager or supervisor to resolve the cause for the alarm. We generally won’t make an apprehension for an alarm activation, we simply want to see merchandise retrieved.

     You never know if your store will be hit by professional shoplifting rings but I can assure you at some point you will be the victim of some variety of shoplifter. If you want to protect health and beauty products or any small merchandise Flexible Safers are the solution for you. Saving money with a Sensormatic System and tags is a beautiful thing.
For more information about how to protect health and beauty products contact us or call 1.866.914.2567.

How important is it for store owners to protect health and beauty products? How important is it to prevent all theft in your store? As I was searching for recent news on Organized Retail Crime (ORC) activity I came across a story that was a strong reminder of why it is important for merchants to prevent shoplifting. A professional shoplifting ring out of Florida was recently caught by police. They are accused of theft to the tune of over $2 million dollars in stolen goods! According to a story in clickorlando.com, May 08, 2018, “5 arrested 1 sought in Florida retail theft ring” the suspects were, “…hitting eight to 10 businesses each day.” This is an incredible amount of merchandise and it was not just one type of store being targeted. The group was hitting grocery stores, drug stores and department stores. The story related that Publix Loss Prevention started the investigation as the group was stealing primarily health and beauty products from their stores. Of course as the investigation by police went into full swing it was determined other chains were being hit by the group also. It turns out the ring was stealing clothes and shoes as well as teeth whitening strips, electric toothbrushes and razors. The goods were then sold on the black market.
     

What are Organized Retail Theft (ORC) rings and is there a way to combat them? ORC groups are professional shoplifting groups. They can vary in the number of people who operate in a ring and they may even use people outside of the ring to actually do the shoplifting. What makes these groups different from the opportunist who enters a store and steals is that the opportunist may only do it as a prank or for a thrill. They may steal a lot over time but not in the quantities or dollars that professional groups will steal. ORC rings are reselling as a business. They may sell on the internet, out of a warehouse or use a “mom and pop” shop as a cover. They will steal anything they can get out of a store but they love to steal small merchandise that is easy to conceal. This is why it is so important to protect health and beauty products.
     

So now you know what an ORC group is but how do you fight back against a group of criminals who may be working in teams or sending in others to steal for them? You prevent shoplifting by using Sensormatic Flexible Safers. Safers are tough, durable, locking bags with electronic article surveillance protection built into them. They add size and alarm protection to smaller pieces of merchandise that would otherwise be easy for shoplifters to steal in bulk quantities. How did the ORC group mentioned at the beginning of this article get away with hitting eight to 10 businesses a day? I would be willing to bet that in part they were avoiding merchandise that had electronic article surveillance protection as much as they possibly could. Professional shoplifters know that activating alarm towers with Flexible Safers or other Sensormatic tags is going to draw unwanted attention and make it difficult to go back to that store again. A store that uses anti-shoplifting devices to protect health and beauty products is one step ahead of the bad guys.
       

It is important that I mention that Sensormatic Safers prevent shoplifting by the opportunist as much as the professional. This is especially true in the health and beauty product departments where so many of the items are pocketable. That means they are small enough to be slipped into a pocket and that is a difficult theft to see. I can tell you that we in the Loss Prevention field are very wary of stopping someone for stealing something as small as a cosmetic item. It is simply too risky and the chance of making a bad stop too great. We often let these people walk out unless they set off an electronic article surveillance alarm and then we leave it up to a store manager or supervisor to resolve the cause for the alarm. We generally won’t make an apprehension for an alarm activation, we simply want to see merchandise retrieved.
     

You never know if your store will be hit by professional shoplifting rings but I can assure you at some point you will be the victim of some variety of shoplifter. If you want to protect health and beauty products or any small merchandise Flexible Safers are the solution for you. Saving money with a Sensormatic System and tags is a beautiful thing.

 

For more information about how to protect health and beauty products contact us or call 1.866.914.2567.

 

Anti-shoplifting Efforts And Stubborn Customers

Anti-shoplifting – 4                                                                                                                    WC Blog 841
Sensormatic security system-4

Anti-shoplifting Efforts And Stubborn Customers

     I just saw a clip on my Facebook feed where a uniformed store security was following anti-shoplifting protocols for a store and asking for a receipt check. I don’t know why I put myself through these painful videos because they tend to just get me angry. I was angry because the customer who filmed the episode was obviously being obnoxious on purpose and trying to start something. His capturing of the event on his phone made that apparent. I was angry that the security officer did not have a better response to the “customer” and the manager who was called over was less helpful. By the end of the two or three minute clip I wanted to snatch that phone and break it. When the store manager decided to just let the obnoxious customer just leave the video recording continued and the manager and security officer asked him to stop and he wouldn’t. I could not tell if there was a Sensormatic security system in use in this store but if there was I would have liked to see what would have happened if the alarm had sounded.

     During my tenure as a Loss Prevention Manager I came across similar situations and empathize with the Security Officer. There is no clear-cut right or wrong answer to this problem. I have looked at number of websites with lawyers giving advice to “legal” websites. The interesting thing is on one website with several lawyers giving their input some say a store has a right to briefly detain those suspected of shoplifting and recommend you stop and show a receipt. They argue it helps keep prices lower for everyone. Others say you are not required to stop and that they keep walking. Others give a short response saying that if you are offended don’t shop there anymore. One response did say that stopping for a receipt check is a requirement of membership for club type stores like Costco. There are even testy debates on websites about whether you are required to stop for a Sensormatic security system or similar alarm activation. Does this qualify as grounds for reasonable detainment?

     To be perfectly frank the issue is there is no federal guideline. Each state has their own laws governing ”Shopkeeper’s Privilege” and what is a reasonable detainment. Anti-shoplifting laws are not universal and therefore as a store owner it is incumbent on you to be familiar with the laws of your own state. This brings up the question of whether it makes sense to even have a person at the door to help prevent shoplifting or a Sensormatic system to discourage thieves? 

     I believe it is in the best interest of stores to have an anti-shoplifting system in place. This is no different than having closed circuit television cameras, camera domes and monitors in a store. They do help deter impulse thieves. These are the people who come in and without a lot of forethought decide to steal as a thrill or on a dare or even peer-pressure. A Sensormatic security system with towers at the doors and merchandise with security tags is usually enough to make these people change their mind about stealing. Even some of the shoplifters who are stealing for drugs are stopped when they realize a security system is in use. The only ones who may not be deterred are the hardcore criminals or organized crime groups who you may not want to be dealing with anyways other than through customer service.

     What about a receipt checker at the door? Most people are going to be cooperative and willing to show a receipt. There are some who are going to refuse. I can only suggest that if you are going to have someone at the door you have a consistent policy of only asking for a receipt on exposed merchandise (meaning merchandise not in a bag from your store). You also need to ensure if employees are responding to a Sensormatic security system alarm that your employees are trained on how to do so properly. Never accuse someone of shoplifting simply because an alarm sounds. It could be a cashier failed to remove a clothing security tag from a shirt or jeans. The great thing is if you aren’t sure your employees are trained properly on alarm response or you don’t have a Sensormatic system, Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. offers training and if you purchase an anti-shoplifting system from them you get FREE training to go along with it.

     There is no easy answer to the problem of receipt checks. Hopefully I have given you a few helpful tips on how to try to resolve the issue. It is important to keep in mind that most honest shoppers will be willing to show receipts in order to help stop shoplifting and keep prices low.
A Sensormatic security system is important and we can help you with it. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.



     

I just saw a clip on my Facebook feed where a uniformed store security was following anti-shoplifting protocols for a store and asking for a receipt check. I don’t know why I put myself through these painful videos because they tend to just get me angry. I was angry because the customer who filmed the episode was obviously being obnoxious on purpose and trying to start something. His capturing of the event on his phone made that apparent. I was angry that the security officer did not have a better response to the “customer” and the manager who was called over was less helpful. By the end of the two or three minute clip I wanted to snatch that phone and break it. When the store manager decided to just let the obnoxious customer just leave the video recording continued and the manager and security officer asked him to stop and he wouldn’t. I could not tell if there was a Sensormatic security system in use in this store but if there was I would have liked to see what would have happened if the alarm had sounded.
     

During my tenure as a Loss Prevention Manager I came across similar situations and empathize with the Security Officer. There is no clear-cut right or wrong answer to this problem. I have looked at number of websites with lawyers giving advice to “legal” websites. The interesting thing is on one website with several lawyers giving their input some say a store has a right to briefly detain those suspected of shoplifting and recommend you stop and show a receipt. They argue it helps keep prices lower for everyone. Others say you are not required to stop and that they keep walking. Others give a short response saying that if you are offended don’t shop there anymore. One response did say that stopping for a receipt check is a requirement of membership for club type stores like Costco. There are even testy debates on websites about whether you are required to stop for a Sensormatic security system or similar alarm activation. Does this qualify as grounds for reasonable detainment?
     

To be perfectly frank the issue is there is no federal guideline. Each state has their own laws governing ”Shopkeeper’s Privilege” and what is a reasonable detainment. Anti-shoplifting laws are not universal and therefore as a store owner it is incumbent on you to be familiar with the laws of your own state. This brings up the question of whether it makes sense to even have a person at the door to help prevent shoplifting or a Sensormatic system to discourage thieves? 
     

I believe it is in the best interest of stores to have an anti-shoplifting system in place. This is no different than having closed circuit television cameras, camera domes and monitors in a store. They do help deter impulse thieves. These are the people who come in and without a lot of forethought decide to steal as a thrill or on a dare or even peer-pressure. A Sensormatic security system with towers at the doors and merchandise with security tags is usually enough to make these people change their mind about stealing. Even some of the shoplifters who are stealing for drugs are stopped when they realize a security system is in use. The only ones who may not be deterred are the hardcore criminals or organized crime groups who you may not want to be dealing with anyways other than through customer service.
     

What about a receipt checker at the door? Most people are going to be cooperative and willing to show a receipt. There are some who are going to refuse. I can only suggest that if you are going to have someone at the door you have a consistent policy of only asking for a receipt on exposed merchandise (meaning merchandise not in a bag from your store). You also need to ensure if employees are responding to a Sensormatic security system alarm that your employees are trained on how to do so properly. Never accuse someone of shoplifting simply because an alarm sounds. It could be a cashier failed to remove a clothing security tag from a shirt or jeans. The great thing is if you aren’t sure your employees are trained properly on alarm response or you don’t have a Sensormatic system, Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. offers training and if you purchase an anti-shoplifting system from them you get FREE training to go along with it.
     

There is no easy answer to the problem of receipt checks. Hopefully I have given you a few helpful tips on how to try to resolve the issue. It is important to keep in mind that most honest shoppers will be willing to show receipts in order to help stop shoplifting and keep prices low.

 

A Sensormatic security system is important and we can help you with it. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.


     

Not All Solutions To Protect Games Are Equal


Protect Games – 4                                                                                                     WC Blog 839
Prevent Shoplifting – 3

Not All Solutions To Protect Games Are Equal

         I am a fan of video games but when it comes to shoplifting I don’t play games and I look for the ways stores protect games. I am aware of one chain store that stocks only empty display boxes on shelves to protect the merchandise. The challenge with this method of protecting product is two-fold. First just having an empty box on display does not necessarily mean there is a live corresponding disc to be sold. Two, even though the stores store the discs in alphabetical order, I have personally experienced the wait while associates searched for the item I wanted. I can even recall once when a disc I wanted could not be located. It was a very frustrating experience.

     I worked for a store that used display cases to stock video games in order to prevent shoplifting. This posed its own unique set of problems. First, some of the games were displayed with the spine of the game facing the customer. The pictures that are designed to pique the interest of potential customers were not visible. I believe this display hampered sales. Next was the display case itself…it was locked. If a customer wanted to look at merchandise they had to try to get an employee’s attention in order to open the showcase. Yes, showcases prevent shoplifting and I would contend they prevent sales as well.

      A slightly better option I see in one retail giant is a game in a lock box attached by a cord to the display case. It does give the shopper a bit more flexibility to look at the game, turn the box over and read the description on the back and seem more information in general. Still the customer is forced to seek assistance from an employee if they want to make a purchase. The showcase itself is still locked. I would not mind this option so much if there was always someone standing nearby with a key. Unfortunately in the world of retail with tighter payroll budgets, that is not going to happen very often. Thus the advent of the wonderful thing we have come to know as a “call button”. Help is just a push away (and maybe several minutes away depending on how busy the associates are at the time).

     Then there is the solution I have come to call the dump bin. There is nothing in place to prevent shoplifting in many cases. These tend to be bins filled with older games that may not be quite as popular so they are dumped in one of these containers. Customers have to dig and search to look at games. An avalanche may drop everything back on top of the item they had almost reached at the bottom of the mess. In some instances the games may protect games with an electronic article surveillance label which at least is some defense against theft. The problem is that the bad guys will remove the cellophane wrap and take the package and disc. These can then go to stores that buy “used” games for a few bucks each. There is always the internet option for selling or a trade for drugs on the street. Shoplifters are not necessarily picky about how they get money or drugs.

     The preferred method in my mind to protect games is to use Sensormatic Safers. They look like a storage bag with a locking zipper and basically that is what they are. What is unique about these bags is that they are made of polyethylene and nylon material making them extremely durable. They also have electronic article surveillance built into them ensuring they will work with a Sensormatic security tower system. Why do I like this method of protecting merchandise? Accessibility for customers is the reason. Shoppers can pick up a game in a Safer, look at it from all angles and carry it around the store. They don’t have to wait for someone to help them open a display case just to look at an item they may or may not be interested in purchasing. The merchandise remains secure and the customer is more likely to buy it when they can carry it with them while conducting other shopping.

      It is important to protect games and high shrink merchandise but it is just as important to ensure your customers have access to merchandise. The longer they have to wait for help or jump through hoops to make a purchase the less likely they will be to shop in your store in the future. Flexible Safers allow you to be flexible with your customers and that has a positive impact on sales and shortage.

It is important to protect games and we can help you with it.  Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.   

I am a fan of video games but when it comes to shoplifting I don’t play games and I look for the ways stores protect games. I am aware of one chain store that stocks only empty display boxes on shelves to protect the merchandise. The challenge with this method of protecting product is two-fold. First just having an empty box on display does not necessarily mean there is a live corresponding disc to be sold. Two, even though the stores store the discs in alphabetical order, I have personally experienced the wait while associates searched for the item I wanted. I can even recall once when a disc I wanted could not be located. It was a very frustrating experience.
     

I worked for a store that used display cases to stock video games in order to prevent shoplifting. This posed its own unique set of problems. First, some of the games were displayed with the spine of the game facing the customer. The pictures that are designed to pique the interest of potential customers were not visible. I believe this display hampered sales. Next was the display case itself…it was locked. If a customer wanted to look at merchandise they had to try to get an employee’s attention in order to open the showcase. Yes, showcases prevent shoplifting and I would contend they prevent sales as well.
     

A slightly better option I see in one retail giant is a game in a lock box attached by a cord to the display case. It does give the shopper a bit more flexibility to look at the game, turn the box over and read the description on the back and seem more information in general. Still the customer is forced to seek assistance from an employee if they want to make a purchase. The showcase itself is still locked. I would not mind this option so much if there was always someone standing nearby with a key. Unfortunately in the world of retail with tighter payroll budgets, that is not going to happen very often. Thus the advent of the wonderful thing we have come to know as a “call button”. Help is just a push away (and maybe several minutes away depending on how busy the associates are at the time).
     

Then there is the solution I have come to call the dump bin. There is nothing in place to prevent shoplifting in many cases. These tend to be bins filled with older games that may not be quite as popular so they are dumped in one of these containers. Customers have to dig and search to look at games. An avalanche may drop everything back on top of the item they had almost reached at the bottom of the mess. In some instances the games may protect games with an electronic article surveillance label which at least is some defense against theft. The problem is that the bad guys will remove the cellophane wrap and take the package and disc. These can then go to stores that buy “used” games for a few bucks each. There is always the internet option for selling or a trade for drugs on the street. Shoplifters are not necessarily picky about how they get money or drugs.
     

The preferred method in my mind to protect games is to use Sensormatic Safers. They look like a storage bag with a locking zipper and basically that is what they are. What is unique about these bags is that they are made of polyethylene and nylon material making them extremely durable. They also have electronic article surveillance built into them ensuring they will work with a Sensormatic security tower system. Why do I like this method of protecting merchandise? Accessibility for customers is the reason. Shoppers can pick up a game in a Safer, look at it from all angles and carry it around the store. They don’t have to wait for someone to help them open a display case just to look at an item they may or may not be interested in purchasing. The merchandise remains secure and the customer is more likely to buy it when they can carry it with them while conducting other shopping.
     

It is important to protect games and high shrink merchandise but it is just as important to ensure your customers have access to merchandise. The longer they have to wait for help or jump through hoops to make a purchase the less likely they will be to shop in your store in the future. Flexible Safers allow you to be flexible with your customers and that has a positive impact on sales and shortage.

 

It is important to protect games and we can help you with it.  Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.