Maintaining Space In Medical Facility Halls And Doorways Does Not Mean Electronic Article Surveillance Protection Is Out Of The Question; The Classic N10 Tower Is A Perfect Solution

Classic N10 – 5                                                                                                                     WC Blog 401
Bug Tag -4


Maintaining Space In Medical Facility Halls And Doorways Does Not Mean Electronic Article Surveillance Protection Is Out Of The Question; The Classic N10 Tower Is A Perfect Solution

     In the past year I have been in hospitals and doctors offices far more than I would like. In some of those cases the hallways had ample room for gurneys and staff to rush by me as I walked to the rooms I was visiting. Admittedly when I heard the quick pace of feet and clatter of wheels, whether there was enough room or not, I found myself stepping against the wall. Instinctively I knew that if that was my loved one I would want them to get through to surgery as quickly as possible. Sometimes I would pass groups of doctors who were on their rounds reviewing notes on their i-Pads and tablets and discussing the patients they were ready to see or had just seen. In some cases this took place in the area of the nurse’s station and space was a little tighter. Again, being aware that they were busy I would make efforts to stay out of their way. As I reflect on those hospital and office visits I think about the activities that went on around me. Medical personnel with new technology in hand, life-saving equipment lining hallways, professional medical care givers moving patients in and out of rooms and down those same halls. It can start to feel a bit claustrophobic. Putting on my Loss Prevention hat I thought about all of these factors and what if questions. What if there is Tablet theft of those medical tablets? What if an electronic article surveillance (EAS) system could be installed to prevent i-Pad theft? Would there be room for the necessary EAS towers like the Checkpoint Classic N10?

     In order to proceed with the answers to my questions it is only proper to explain what the Bug Tag and the Classic N10 are. The Tag is simply an anti-theft device that is stuck to a computer tablet and it interacts with an EAS tower. If a tagged mobile medical device is carried too close to a tower the tower alarm sounds a loud beeping noise and lights in the tower flash, alerting nearby employees someone is trying to walk out with a mobile device. If someone is trying to steal a medical tablet by tampering with a Bug Tag, an internal tag alarm sounds also alerting personnel of an attempted theft. The Classic N10 is an EAS tower specifically designed to fit smaller entryways and hallways. They don’t take up the same amount of space a traditional tower takes up. This allows ease of access even if something is being rushed through a hall or doorway such as a patient on a gurney or nurse rushing through a door with a crash cart. These towers won’t interfere with personnel or equipment.

     It was only recently that I learned there is an organization that focuses on hospital space standards. The American Society for Healthcare Engineering looks at hospitals and issues related to effective building designs. In an article on their website, “ICC Considers Changing Corridor Width Rules to Reflect Shift from Life Safety Concerns”, by Deanna Martin, ASHE senior communications specialist, discussed the rules and regulations regarding hospital hallway widths. She mentions diverse views on whether the width requirements take into consideration equipment such as crash carts and whether they count against those measurements. Regardless of what the regulations may or may not say concerning medical facility halls, you can easily see how setting up a Classic N10 tower would take up a smaller amount of space and still accommodate the needs of complying with ICC codes. 

     Medical tablets and i-Pads would be protected from theft and the potential for compromised patient information since they would have a Bug Tag. Doorways and Hallways where you would want to keep mobile devices restricted to could be protected with EAS.

     Keep patient data safe on mobile devices and keep lives safe with open corridors at the same time. Use a Bug Tag on tablets and Classic N10 towers in halls and doors. See how effective an EAS system can be for your medical facility.
For more information about Classic N10 contact us or call 1.866.914.2567.

In the past year I have been in hospitals and doctors offices far more than I would like. In some of those cases the hallways had ample room for gurneys and staff to rush by me as I walked to the rooms I was visiting. Admittedly when I heard the quick pace of feet and clatter of wheels, whether there was enough room or not, I found myself stepping against the wall. Instinctively I knew that if that was my loved one I would want them to get through to surgery as quickly as possible. Sometimes I would pass groups of doctors who were on their rounds reviewing notes on their i-Pads and tablets and discussing the patients they were ready to see or had just seen. In some cases this took place in the area of the nurse’s station and space was a little tighter. Again, being aware that they were busy I would make efforts to stay out of their way. As I reflect on those hospital and office visits I think about the activities that went on around me. Medical personnel with new technology in hand, life-saving equipment lining hallways, professional medical care givers moving patients in and out of rooms and down those same halls. It can start to feel a bit claustrophobic. Putting on my Loss Prevention hat I thought about all of these factors and what if questions. What if there is Tablet theft of those medical tablets? What if an electronic article surveillance (EAS) system could be installed to prevent i-Pad theft? Would there be room for the necessary EAS towers like the Checkpoint Classic N10?
     

In order to proceed with the answers to my questions it is only proper to explain what the Bug Tag and the Classic N10 are. The Tag is simply an anti-theft device that is stuck to a computer tablet and it interacts with an EAS tower. If a tagged mobile medical device is carried too close to a tower the tower alarm sounds a loud beeping noise and lights in the tower flash, alerting nearby employees someone is trying to walk out with a mobile device. If someone is trying to steal a medical tablet by tampering with a Bug Tag, an internal tag alarm sounds also alerting personnel of an attempted theft. The Classic N10 is an EAS tower specifically designed to fit smaller entryways and hallways. They don’t take up the same amount of space a traditional tower takes up. This allows ease of access even if something is being rushed through a hall or doorway such as a patient on a gurney or nurse rushing through a door with a crash cart. These towers won’t interfere with personnel or equipment.
     

It was only recently that I learned there is an organization that focuses on hospital space standards. The American Society for Healthcare Engineering looks at hospitals and issues related to effective building designs. In an article on their website, “ICC Considers Changing Corridor Width Rules to Reflect Shift from Life Safety Concerns”, by Deanna Martin, ASHE senior communications specialist, discussed the rules and regulations regarding hospital hallway widths. She mentions diverse views on whether the width requirements take into consideration equipment such as crash carts and whether they count against those measurements. Regardless of what the regulations may or may not say concerning medical facility halls, you can easily see how setting up a Classic N10 tower would take up a smaller amount of space and still accommodate the needs of complying with ICC codes. 
     

Medical tablets and i-Pads would be protected from theft and the potential for compromised patient information since they would have a Bug Tag. Doorways and Hallways where you would want to keep mobile devices restricted to could be protected with EAS towers.

 

 Keep patient data safe on mobile devices and keep lives safe with open corridors at the same time. Use a Bug Tag on tablets and Classic N10 towers in halls and doors. See how effective an EAS system can be for your medical facility.

 

For more information about Classic N10 contact us or call 1.866.914.2567.

 

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