Enhance Patient Data Security With A Bug Tag

iPad theft – 3                                                                                                                       WC Blog 551
Bug Tag-5

Enhance Patient Data Security With A Bug Tag

     The problem of patient medical information being stolen is not going away any time soon nor is the threat of medical iPad theft.  As an example in a Jan. 3, 2018 article in beckershospitalreview.com by Julie Spitzer, “Stolen computer at Penn Medicine compromises 1k patient records”, the writer says, “Philadelphia-based Penn Medicine mailed letters to roughly 1,000 patients, alerting them to a potential compromise of their personal information after an unencrypted laptop was stolen from the hospital…” The facility claimed that credit card, bank account information and social security numbers were not included in the computer but other patient data was. The solutions many medical institutions want to implement are stricter encryption and security password implementation to prevent potential hacking should a device be stolen. The team at Loss Prevention Systems Inc. has a better means of protecting against iPad theft and medical tablet theft and that is the use of a Bug Tag on all devices.

     The Bug Tag uses electronic article surveillance (EAS) technology working with Checkpoint pedestals to create a virtual electronic barrier to theft. The tag emits a constant radio frequency signal. When that signal is detected by a Checkpoint pedestal a sound is activated that is so loud that in a big box retail store it can be heard from one end of the building to the other. LED lights in pedestals flash drawing more attention to an attempted breach (it also alerts someone who may be hearing impaired that a tagged device is being removed from the building). When an alarm is set off employees respond to the exit and retrieve the device from the offending party. What if the thief runs out after an alarm? Use the 3-alarm Bug Tag and an internal alarm in the tag activates and the criminal can be picked out in a crowd. What if someone just pulls a tag off and then steals the iPad? No problem. The same internal alarm activates if the tag is tampered with and employees respond to the sound of the alarm and recover the unit. As a Loss Prevention Manager I saw the effectiveness of Checkpoint pedestals and how the alarms saved untold thousands of dollars in merchandise in my store. That same protection can keep mobile medical devices in a medical facility.

     The concern over continued medical device theft and data breaches is extensive enough that a story in delawareonline.com Dec 18, 2017 by Meredith Newman, “Delaware doctors, hospitals increase security as medical data breaches continue nationwide” said that the Delaware Health Information Network “…recently hired a privacy and security compliance manager whose sole job is to monitor the safety of patient data and address any concerns that might come up.” The story also reported that there is insurance medical providers can purchase to cover data breaches and these policies can include prebreach and postbreach services! I understand the importance of protecting yourself against lawsuits but when you have to talk about PREBREACH coverage something seems very out of whack to me.

     Encrypting of devices and using strong password protection is important to keep hackers out but the bigger issue is the loss and theft of devices. Many of these mobile computers and handheld devices are being taken home and leaving the security of the building. Use dedicated devices that are held in the building and protect them with a Bug Tag. It might be a bit inconvenient to have to check a device in and out at the beginning and end of the day but the risk of leaving it where it could be stolen is a bigger concern. Many of the HIPPA violations involving data breaches that are reported to the Department of Health and Human Services are caused by computers that have been stolen from cars or homes when taken home. Wouldn’t it make more sense to keep them in a building and protected with anti-theft devices?

      Medical computer tablet theft and iPad theft are happening on a regular basis. As more and more healthcare providers become reliant on electronic resources and digital documentation it is important that patient information is a priority. Use all of the security resources that are available to you and that includes securing the devices you rely on to do your work. Use the Bug Tag and stop criminals before they can spirit a device out of your building.
Get more information on a Bug Tag, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.  

The problem of patient medical information being stolen is not going away any time soon nor is the threat of medical iPad theft.  As an example in a Jan. 3, 2018 article in beckershospitalreview.com by Julie Spitzer, “Stolen computer at Penn Medicine compromises 1k patient records”, the writer says, “Philadelphia-based Penn Medicine mailed letters to roughly 1,000 patients, alerting them to a potential compromise of their personal information after an unencrypted laptop was stolen from the hospital…” The facility claimed that credit card, bank account information and social security numbers were not included in the computer but other patient data was. The solutions many medical institutions want to implement are stricter encryption and security password implementation to prevent potential hacking should a device be stolen. The team at Loss Prevention Systems Inc. has a better means of protecting against iPad theft and medical tablet theft and that is the use of a Bug Tag on all devices.
     

The Bug Tag uses electronic article surveillance (EAS) technology working with EAS pedestals to create a virtual electronic barrier to theft. The tag emits a constant radio frequency signal. When that signal is detected by a EAS pedestal a sound is activated that is so loud that in a big box retail store it can be heard from one end of the building to the other. LED lights in pedestals flash drawing more attention to an attempted breach (it also alerts someone who may be hearing impaired that a tagged device is being removed from the building). When an alarm is set off employees respond to the exit and retrieve the device from the offending party. What if the thief runs out after an alarm? Use the 3-alarm Bug Tag and an internal alarm in the tag activates and the criminal can be picked out in a crowd. What if someone just pulls a tag off and then steals the iPad? No problem. The same internal alarm activates if the tag is tampered with and employees respond to the sound of the alarm and recover the unit. As a Loss Prevention Manager I saw the effectiveness of EAS pedestals and how the alarms saved untold thousands of dollars in merchandise in my store. That same protection can keep mobile medical devices in a medical facility.
     

The concern over continued medical device theft and data breaches is extensive enough that a story in delawareonline.com Dec 18, 2017 by Meredith Newman, “Delaware doctors, hospitals increase security as medical data breaches continue nationwide” said that the Delaware Health Information Network “…recently hired a privacy and security compliance manager whose sole job is to monitor the safety of patient data and address any concerns that might come up.” The story also reported that there is insurance medical providers can purchase to cover data breaches and these policies can include prebreach and postbreach services! I understand the importance of protecting yourself against lawsuits but when you have to talk about PREBREACH coverage something seems very out of whack to me.
     

Encrypting of devices and using strong password protection is important to keep hackers out but the bigger issue is the loss and theft of devices. Many of these mobile computers and handheld devices are being taken home and leaving the security of the building. Use dedicated devices that are held in the building and protect them with a Bug Tag. It might be a bit inconvenient to have to check a device in and out at the beginning and end of the day but the risk of leaving it where it could be stolen is a bigger concern. Many of the HIPPA violations involving data breaches that are reported to the Department of Health and Human Services are caused by computers that have been stolen from cars or homes when taken home. Wouldn’t it make more sense to keep them in a building and protected with anti-theft devices?
     

Medical computer tablet theft and iPad theft are happening on a regular basis. As more and more healthcare providers become reliant on electronic resources and digital documentation it is important that patient information is a priority. Use all of the security resources that are available to you and that includes securing the devices you rely on to do your work. Use the Bug Tag and stop criminals before they can spirit a device out of your building.

 

Get more information on a Bug Tag, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.  

Sensormatic Hard Tags Aid In Organized Retail Crime Prevention Part 1

It is easy for retailers to focus efforts on how to stop shoplifting in their stores but as a retail owner did you know that there are two types of shoplifting?   Sensormatic hard tags will address both of these but it is important to understand the differences. There is the everyday variety or what may called the opportunist. There is the type of shoplifter who steals simply to earn money to support a drug habit or even to horde the merchandise (the kleptomaniac). Then there are the Organized Retail Crime (ORC) shoplifters. This is a different kind of shoplifter because it is not one person working alone it is a group with a leader(s) at the core. The group may do their own shoplifting or they may send others to do their stealing for them. To add another dimension to the ORC groups, when they do recruit others to steal for them it may be different people every time. Having worked as a retail Loss Prevention Associate and Manager for many years I can tell you that this makes catching these groups and stopping them extremely difficult. If catching them is going to be done it requires a coordinated effort between Loss Prevention teams and police. Where does this leave the independent retail store owner? You can’t afford a Loss Prevention team and you certainly shouldn’t be trying to apprehend a shoplifter let alone a group of shoplifters. Perhaps you don’t even think of it as a problem since this may be the first you are hearing of ORC.

stop shoplifting with  Sensormatic hard tagsLet me explain why the topic of ORC for this article came up in the first place. I came across an article on Fox Carolina, “Deputies: 3 arrested for organized retail theft in Anderson Co.”, by Savannah Sondov, Jul 19, 2018. The story tells of how the three had hired people to go into stores and steal merchandise for them. The group paid the shoplifters at a fraction of the merchandise retail value. The group then sold the merchandise at flea markets making a profit. The police recovered $121,997 in merchandise from the ring. The story reports that “retailers lost a combined $9-12 million over a five-year period due (to) the suspects buying from shoplifters.” That kind of theft means a LOT of retailers were victimized and there is no telling if the small retail stores were or were not victims as well as national chain stores. One thing is certain to me, in order to stop shoplifting by ORC’s or the everyday shoplifter stores must use Sensormatic hard tags on merchandise.

It is appropriate to discuss briefly how these tags can make an impact on theft. Sensormatic hard tags provide a deterrent against people who want to steal from your store. It makes no difference if you are attempted to put up a barrier to the opportunist shoplifters or to the crooks stealing to sell to an ORC group. One thing that the various shoplifters have in common is they don’t want to chance getting caught. These tags are designed to ensure a Sensormatic alarm pedestal will sound an alert in the event someone tries to waltz out of a store with tagged, unpaid merchandise. When shoplifters see these tags they tend to be reluctant to try to take the item. For your store it means you can effectively stop shoplifting of all types and that makes your operation more profitable.

There are going to be some readers who still don’t see Organized Retail Crime is that big a concern to them. One ORC group being caught does not appear to be reason enough to those readers to prompt them to purchase Sensormatic hard tags or the associated hardware. In part 2 of this article we will explore more about the impact of ORC on retailers and how Sensormatic can be an integral part of the success of your business.

Get more information on Sensormatic hard tags, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today

Deactivate Labels To Avoid Customer Service Issues

 

Stop Shoplifting – 3                                                                                                                  WC Blog 469
Checkpoint Labels – 4
Deactivate Checkpoint Labels To Avoid Customer Service Issues 
     My current position as a shift manager in a library is sometimes very similar to my former position as a Loss Prevention Manager. In the library we use anti-theft systems that are identical to the retail anti-theft systems found in retail stores. We use tags here similar to EAS (electronic article surveillance) Checkpoint labels that we used in my store and they operate in a like manner. The tag we use in books and on DVD’s and music CD’s protects library inventory just as the EAS labels protected so many of the products we sold in our store.  The systems are so similar that I recover materials on a fairly frequent basis using the skills I learned in retail to stop shoplifting. I also find I have to coach employees about the need to deactivate or de-tune labels properly just as I did in retail.
     Stepping back for a moment I want to explain what Checkpoint labels are. These are soft tags that retail stores can place on merchandise that will cause an alarm in an EAS pedestal. The labels have a coiled wire in them that sends out a signal and when the signal gets in a specific vicinity of a pedestal an alarm is triggered. The alarm coming from the pedestal attracts the attention of store personnel and they respond to determine what caused the activation. Usually the only reason for an alarm is someone leaving a store with merchandise that has not been paid for. On a rare occasion an employee may fail to see merchandise in the bottom of a shopping cart that can then set off a pedestal. It is also possible that the employee does not use a scan bed or deactivation pad properly and this will cause an alarm. Both of these are rare instances and require follow up training with the employee. 
     The system in our library is similar to a Checkpoint system with the difference being that we are preventing theft of materials while the store retail anti-theft system will stop shoplifting. I would be remiss if I failed to mention that sometimes we have failures to deactivate tags in the library just as we encountered in retail. For example, the other day I was at one of our desks and heard the alarm pedestal sound. I came around the corner and spoke to the patron who clearly could not figure out why the alarm sounded. She was insistent she had just checked out an item. Since we often email receipts I could not compare a receipt to anything to determine if she was telling me the truth. I nicely escorted her back to the counter where she had checked out and she told me who it was that checked out her materials. The worker confirmed that he had and I asked if he had used the deactivation pad when he checked out the items. It turned out he had used the hand scanner and did not use the pad and it caused the alarm. I had the materials checked in and out again properly and sent the patron on her way. I then explained to the worker what he had done wrong and the impact it had on customer service by not being careful. The EAS deactivation pad turns off an EAS label. When the handheld scanner is used but the materials are not laid on the pad Checkpoint labels are not turned off or detuned and this causes false alarms at the pedestals.
     The lesson was learned and I may not have to address this worker again but as in retail you have to keep on top of these things. As a Loss Prevention Manager I had to speak to cashiers regularly about the customer service issues caused when they failed to deactivate Checkpoint Labels. It is difficult to stop shoplifting when excessive alarms cause unnecessary distractions and employee response becomes lazy. In the library excessive alarms are loud and irritate students trying to study. It also causes staff to become complacent in alarm response in a library and opens up the opportunity for materials to be stolen. Whether it is in a library or a retail store be sure to train staff on how to properly deactivate Checkpoint labels to make your systems more effective and customer friendly. 
Get more information on Checkpoint labels. Give us a call at 1.866.914.2567 now.

My current position as a shift manager in a library is sometimes very similar to my former position as a Loss Prevention Manager. In the library we use anti-theft systems that are identical to the retail anti-theft systems found in retail stores. We use tags here similar to EAS (electronic article surveillance) labels that we used in my store and they operate in a like manner. The tag we use in books and on DVD’s and music CD’s protects library inventory just as the EAS labels protected so many of the products we sold in our store. The systems are so similar that I recover materials on a fairly frequent basis using the skills I learned in retail to stop shoplifting. I also find I have to coach employees about the need to deactivate or de-tune labels properly just as I did in retail.

Stepping back for a moment I want to explain what labels are. These are soft tags that retail stores can place on merchandise that will cause an alarm in an EAS pedestal. The labels have a coiled wire in them that sends out a signal and when the signal gets in a specific vicinity of a pedestal an alarm is triggered. The alarm coming from the pedestal attracts the attention of store personnel and they respond to determine what caused the activation. Usually the only reason for an alarm is someone leaving a store with merchandise that has not been paid for. On a rare occasion an employee may fail to see merchandise in the bottom of a shopping cart that can then set off a pedestal. It is also possible that the employee does not use a scan bed or deactivation pad properly and this will cause an alarm. Both of these are rare instances and require follow up training with the employee. 

The system in our library is similar to a EAS system with the difference being that we are preventing theft of materials while the store retail anti-theft system will stop shoplifting. I would be remiss if I failed to mention that sometimes we have failures to deactivate tags in the library just as we encountered in retail. For example, the other day I was at one of our desks and heard the alarm pedestal sound. I came around the corner and spoke to the patron who clearly could not figure out why the alarm sounded. She was insistent she had just checked out an item. Since we often email receipts I could not compare a receipt to anything to determine if she was telling me the truth. I nicely escorted her back to the counter where she had checked out and she told me who it was that checked out her materials. The worker confirmed that he had and I asked if he had used the deactivation pad when he checked out the items. It turned out he had used the hand scanner and did not use the pad and it caused the alarm. I had the materials checked in and out again properly and sent the patron on her way. I then explained to the worker what he had done wrong and the impact it had on customer service by not being careful. The EAS deactivation pad turns off an EAS label. When the handheld scanner is used but the materials are not laid on the pad labels are not turned off or detuned and this causes false alarms at the pedestals.

 

The lesson was learned and I may not have to address this worker again but as in retail you have to keep on top of these things. As a Loss Prevention Manager I had to speak to cashiers regularly about the customer service issues caused when they failed to deactivate labels. It is difficult to stop shoplifting when excessive alarms cause unnecessary distractions and employee response becomes lazy. In the library excessive alarms are loud and irritate students trying to study. It also causes staff to become complacent in alarm response in a library and opens up the opportunity for materials to be stolen. Whether it is in a library or a retail store be sure to train staff on how to properly deactivate labels to make your systems more effective and customer friendly. 

 

Get more information on labels. Give us a call at 1.866.914.2567 now.