Sensormatic

Cure Lengthy Checkout Lines Using Retail Traffic Counting Devices

Retail Traffic Counting-3                                                                                                    wc blog 844
Door Counting Sensor-4

Cure Lengthy Checkout Lines Using Retail Traffic Counting Devices

     How many times when I am standing in a long line to check out in a retail store do I wish I had a personal retail traffic counting device. I want to know how many people are in front of me and why there are other lines that are just as long with a minimum number of cashiers working. Oh it is really easy to dismiss it as a fluke and I just happened to get in at the wrong time but when it happens over and over again it isn’t a fluke. It is poor staffing and scheduling by some scheduling manager or it may be the result of an automated scheduling system. The worse-case scenario in my mind is someone creating a cashier schedule with no concept of customer traffic patterns. It is those situations when a door counting sensor would be a help.

     Consider the difference it would make if a store was basing scheduling not off of an equal allocation of budget dollars for each day of the week but rather on the flow of customer traffic. Is 4:00pm on a Monday afternoon in the winter the same as 4:00pm on a Monday in the summer? Living in a tourist town I can say for certain it is not. Customer traffic is much different here based on seasonal activity and by the days of the week. Saturday at 1:00pm for a store can look nothing like 1:00pm on a Tuesday. If you don’t believe me try strolling through your local mall on those days and see what I mean. The same holds true for your own store. Your traffic patterns are not going to be the same every day. If you are scheduling your team as though the days are all the same you are probably hurting sales and losing more merchandise to shoplifters. The fix is easy and only requires a retail traffic counting device be attached to your Sensormatic security system.

     A door counting sensor will enable store owners to see how many people are entering the store and at what time of the day/night they are coming in. Schedules can be created around those hours. Now, think about me standing in that long line at the local big box store. There are too few cashiers for the number of patrons because of some scheduling screw-up. Using retail traffic counting managers can begin evaluating the shopping patterns of clientele. Open the doors at 8:00am and you may only need a single cashier until 10:00am. You may have had two cashiers in the past but numbers show that only one is necessary. Perhaps you choose to put that two hours of payroll into your 5:00pm-7:00pm shift. Maybe you add it to your Saturday at 1:00pm when you have more customers. Wait lines go down and shoppers are happier. Happier customers are willing to return and spend money.

     Lest I neglect to mention it the use of a door counting sensor can also help in decreasing theft in a store as well as cut down checkout wait times. If shortage due to theft is believed to be a concern it could be because shoplifters are taking advantage of the busy times of the day. If the store does not have adequate coverage on the salesfloor during peak hours crooks will find it much easier to steal from a business. Using the data from a door counting sensor managers can better spread the salesfloor coverage around to impact those busier days and hours. That translates to improved customer service reducing opportunities to steal while enhancing the opportunities to increase sales through suggestive selling and add-on sales.

     Retail traffic counting can have a tremendous impact on a store. When used properly it can enhance the customer service satisfaction of your patrons by helping to allocate payroll dollars to the times when you have more shoppers in the store. When used with a Sensormatic security system camera it can help in tracking electronic article surveillance alarm activity and employee response to those alarms. It can also assist in improving salesfloor staffing to ensure shoplifters are deterred through better customer service. That will drive up sales and decrease theft and who can argue with that?
Door counting sensors are important and we can help you with them. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.

How many times when I am standing in a long line to check out in a retail store do I wish I had a personal retail traffic counting device. I want to know how many people are in front of me and why there are other lines that are just as long with a minimum number of cashiers working. Oh it is really easy to dismiss it as a fluke and I just happened to get in at the wrong time but when it happens over and over again it isn’t a fluke. It is poor staffing and scheduling by some scheduling manager or it may be the result of an automated scheduling system. The worse-case scenario in my mind is someone creating a cashier schedule with no concept of customer traffic patterns. It is those situations when a door counting sensor would be a help.
     

Consider the difference it would make if a store was basing scheduling not off of an equal allocation of budget dollars for each day of the week but rather on the flow of customer traffic. Is 4:00pm on a Monday afternoon in the winter the same as 4:00pm on a Monday in the summer? Living in a tourist town I can say for certain it is not. Customer traffic is much different here based on seasonal activity and by the days of the week. Saturday at 1:00pm for a store can look nothing like 1:00pm on a Tuesday. If you don’t believe me try strolling through your local mall on those days and see what I mean. The same holds true for your own store. Your traffic patterns are not going to be the same every day. If you are scheduling your team as though the days are all the same you are probably hurting sales and losing more merchandise to shoplifters. The fix is easy and only requires a retail traffic counting device be attached to your Sensormatic security system.
     

A door counting sensor will enable store owners to see how many people are entering the store and at what time of the day/night they are coming in. Schedules can be created around those hours. Now, think about me standing in that long line at the local big box store. There are too few cashiers for the number of patrons because of some scheduling screw-up. Using retail traffic counting managers can begin evaluating the shopping patterns of clientele. Open the doors at 8:00am and you may only need a single cashier until 10:00am. You may have had two cashiers in the past but numbers show that only one is necessary. Perhaps you choose to put that two hours of payroll into your 5:00pm-7:00pm shift. Maybe you add it to your Saturday at 1:00pm when you have more customers. Wait lines go down and shoppers are happier. Happier customers are willing to return and spend money.
     

Lest I neglect to mention it the use of a door counting sensor can also help in decreasing theft in a store as well as cut down checkout wait times. If shortage due to theft is believed to be a concern it could be because shoplifters are taking advantage of the busy times of the day. If the store does not have adequate coverage on the salesfloor during peak hours crooks will find it much easier to steal from a business. Using the data from a door counting sensor managers can better spread the salesfloor coverage around to impact those busier days and hours. That translates to improved customer service reducing opportunities to steal while enhancing the opportunities to increase sales through suggestive selling and add-on sales.
     

Retail traffic counting can have a tremendous impact on a store. When used properly it can enhance the customer service satisfaction of your patrons by helping to allocate payroll dollars to the times when you have more shoppers in the store. When used with a Sensormatic security system camera it can help in tracking electronic article surveillance alarm activity and employee response to those alarms. It can also assist in improving salesfloor staffing to ensure shoplifters are deterred through better customer service. That will drive up sales and decrease theft and who can argue with that?

 

Door counting sensors are important and we can help you with them. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.

 

My Favorite Cases When I Would Stop Shoplifting – Part 3


Sensormatic Security System – 4                                                                          WC Blog 827
Stop Shoplifting – 3

My Favorite Cases When I Would Stop Shoplifting – Part 3

     This is part three and the final segment on my favorite cases from when I would stop shoplifting. As a Retail Loss Prevention Officer or Manager we encounter many scary, funny and odd cases. In this installment I want to share my scariest shoplifting moments and remind readers why care must be taken when you stop shoplifters.
7. The department store where I started out my career did not use a Sensormatic security system but we did use a similar anti-theft system. Some but not all of our clothing products were tagged to prevent theft. In this particular incident a female shoplifter stuffed a purse full of clothing and started to exit the building and the alarm sounded. I stopped her and she ran back in the store threw the merchandise all over the place then ran back out. I chased her but she was very overweight and ran out of energy so she stopped, put her hand in her purse and told me I had better leave her alone. The implication was clear she was suggesting she had a gun or weapon in her purse. The police arrived a minute or two later. She was arrested and charged with shoplifting. I was a bit shocked when I learned that she had a lengthy arrest record that included an “Involuntary Manslaughter” charge. Yes, I did stop shoplifting and probably helped put a dangerous person in jail but it did give me pause to think the next time I watched a suspect.
8. I remember my first shoplifting case with my second company. I was in training at another store in a metro market. The Loss Prevention Officers followed a pair of suspects out of the store who had loaded an outdoor trash canister with multipliers and knives. The Sensormatic security system alarmed as the suspects walked through the towers. I happened to be outside when the alarm activated. Though I had a number of years of experience I stayed back a bit in a support role and monitored the team as they made the stop. One of the suspects quickly put his hand in his jacket pocket and pepper sprayed but not the Loss Prevention Officers who stopped him, he got ME! I had experienced CS gas in the military so this was not unbearable and I chased him but he sprayed me two more times and I could not see any more. I had to hide between several parked cars to ensure I did not get run over. Someone got the suspect’s license plate number and a year later I was subpoenaed to his hearing. It turned out he had a laundry list of prior convictions for all sorts of crimes.
9. This is not the most memorable case but it is near the top of my dangerous shoplifting cases and certainly in my personal top 9 or 10 list. In this case a thief had been in the store early in the day and I suspected stole a purse and activated the Sensormatic security system towers but I could not make a stop. I had not seen the selection. Later that night the suspect returned and did the same thing but this time I was ready. I stopped him and he returned to the store but after a brief struggle with me pulled out of his coat. I grabbed our purse and one he carried into the store. I lost him in a foot chase but when I returned to the store I had a surprise. I had tossed the purses to a manager and when I looked in his I found his prison release identification card but more concerning was a butcher knife he had hidden in it! The suspect was later picked up on another charge and the outstanding shoplifting warrant.
10. This is short but it tops the most dangerous shoplifter cases I encountered. I had a guy I observed stealing from our store. I followed all of the steps required to apprehend a shoplifter and as he approached the exit doors I identified myself and told him he needed to come back in and talk to me about the item he had taken. The suspect lifted the front of his t-shirt and exposed the handle of a handgun. I backed away to disengage and went back in the store to call the police. No apprehension and no recovery but I walked away intact. 
Not every shoplifter is dangerous and with common sense, a Sensormatic security system and training on how to stop shoplifting offered by Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. you will reduce your exposure to theft and fraud. That means you increase profits while keeping you and your employees safe.
Get more information on how to stop shoplifting, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today. 
      

This is part three and the final segment on my favorite cases from when I would stop shoplifting. As a Retail Loss Prevention Officer or Manager we encounter many scary, funny and odd cases. In this installment I want to share my scariest shoplifting moments and remind readers why care must be taken when you stop shoplifters.

 

7. The department store where I started out my career did not use a Sensormatic security system but we did use a similar anti-theft system. Some but not all of our clothing products were tagged to prevent theft. In this particular incident a female shoplifter stuffed a purse full of clothing and started to exit the building and the alarm sounded. I stopped her and she ran back in the store threw the merchandise all over the place then ran back out. I chased her but she was very overweight and ran out of energy so she stopped, put her hand in her purse and told me I had better leave her alone. The implication was clear she was suggesting she had a gun or weapon in her purse. The police arrived a minute or two later. She was arrested and charged with shoplifting. I was a bit shocked when I learned that she had a lengthy arrest record that included an “Involuntary Manslaughter” charge. Yes, I did stop shoplifting and probably helped put a dangerous person in jail but it did give me pause to think the next time I watched a suspect.

 

8. I remember my first shoplifting case with my second company. I was in training at another store in a metro market. The Loss Prevention Officers followed a pair of suspects out of the store who had loaded an outdoor trash canister with multipliers and knives. The Sensormatic security system alarmed as the suspects walked through the towers. I happened to be outside when the alarm activated. Though I had a number of years of experience I stayed back a bit in a support role and monitored the team as they made the stop. One of the suspects quickly put his hand in his jacket pocket and pepper sprayed but not the Loss Prevention Officers who stopped him, he got ME! I had experienced CS gas in the military so this was not unbearable and I chased him but he sprayed me two more times and I could not see any more. I had to hide between several parked cars to ensure I did not get run over. Someone got the suspect’s license plate number and a year later I was subpoenaed to his hearing. It turned out he had a laundry list of prior convictions for all sorts of crimes.

 

9. This is not the most memorable case but it is near the top of my dangerous shoplifting cases and certainly in my personal top 9 or 10 list. In this case a thief had been in the store early in the day and I suspected stole a purse and activated the Sensormatic security system towers but I could not make a stop. I had not seen the selection. Later that night the suspect returned and did the same thing but this time I was ready. I stopped him and he returned to the store but after a brief struggle with me pulled out of his coat. I grabbed our purse and one he carried into the store. I lost him in a foot chase but when I returned to the store I had a surprise. I had tossed the purses to a manager and when I looked in his I found his prison release identification card but more concerning was a butcher knife he had hidden in it! The suspect was later picked up on another charge and the outstanding shoplifting warrant.

 

10. This is short but it tops the most dangerous shoplifter cases I encountered. I had a guy I observed stealing from our store. I followed all of the steps required to apprehend a shoplifter and as he approached the exit doors I identified myself and told him he needed to come back in and talk to me about the item he had taken. The suspect lifted the front of his t-shirt and exposed the handle of a handgun. I backed away to disengage and went back in the store to call the police. No apprehension and no recovery but I walked away intact. 

 

Not every shoplifter is dangerous and with common sense, a Sensormatic security system and training on how to stop shoplifting offered by Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. you will reduce your exposure to theft and fraud. That means you increase profits while keeping you and your employees safe.

 

Get more information on how to stop shoplifting, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.       

 

Not All Solutions To Protect Games Are Equal


Protect Games – 4                                                                                                     WC Blog 839
Prevent Shoplifting – 3

Not All Solutions To Protect Games Are Equal

         I am a fan of video games but when it comes to shoplifting I don’t play games and I look for the ways stores protect games. I am aware of one chain store that stocks only empty display boxes on shelves to protect the merchandise. The challenge with this method of protecting product is two-fold. First just having an empty box on display does not necessarily mean there is a live corresponding disc to be sold. Two, even though the stores store the discs in alphabetical order, I have personally experienced the wait while associates searched for the item I wanted. I can even recall once when a disc I wanted could not be located. It was a very frustrating experience.

     I worked for a store that used display cases to stock video games in order to prevent shoplifting. This posed its own unique set of problems. First, some of the games were displayed with the spine of the game facing the customer. The pictures that are designed to pique the interest of potential customers were not visible. I believe this display hampered sales. Next was the display case itself…it was locked. If a customer wanted to look at merchandise they had to try to get an employee’s attention in order to open the showcase. Yes, showcases prevent shoplifting and I would contend they prevent sales as well.

      A slightly better option I see in one retail giant is a game in a lock box attached by a cord to the display case. It does give the shopper a bit more flexibility to look at the game, turn the box over and read the description on the back and seem more information in general. Still the customer is forced to seek assistance from an employee if they want to make a purchase. The showcase itself is still locked. I would not mind this option so much if there was always someone standing nearby with a key. Unfortunately in the world of retail with tighter payroll budgets, that is not going to happen very often. Thus the advent of the wonderful thing we have come to know as a “call button”. Help is just a push away (and maybe several minutes away depending on how busy the associates are at the time).

     Then there is the solution I have come to call the dump bin. There is nothing in place to prevent shoplifting in many cases. These tend to be bins filled with older games that may not be quite as popular so they are dumped in one of these containers. Customers have to dig and search to look at games. An avalanche may drop everything back on top of the item they had almost reached at the bottom of the mess. In some instances the games may protect games with an electronic article surveillance label which at least is some defense against theft. The problem is that the bad guys will remove the cellophane wrap and take the package and disc. These can then go to stores that buy “used” games for a few bucks each. There is always the internet option for selling or a trade for drugs on the street. Shoplifters are not necessarily picky about how they get money or drugs.

     The preferred method in my mind to protect games is to use Sensormatic Safers. They look like a storage bag with a locking zipper and basically that is what they are. What is unique about these bags is that they are made of polyethylene and nylon material making them extremely durable. They also have electronic article surveillance built into them ensuring they will work with a Sensormatic security tower system. Why do I like this method of protecting merchandise? Accessibility for customers is the reason. Shoppers can pick up a game in a Safer, look at it from all angles and carry it around the store. They don’t have to wait for someone to help them open a display case just to look at an item they may or may not be interested in purchasing. The merchandise remains secure and the customer is more likely to buy it when they can carry it with them while conducting other shopping.

      It is important to protect games and high shrink merchandise but it is just as important to ensure your customers have access to merchandise. The longer they have to wait for help or jump through hoops to make a purchase the less likely they will be to shop in your store in the future. Flexible Safers allow you to be flexible with your customers and that has a positive impact on sales and shortage.

It is important to protect games and we can help you with it.  Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.   

I am a fan of video games but when it comes to shoplifting I don’t play games and I look for the ways stores protect games. I am aware of one chain store that stocks only empty display boxes on shelves to protect the merchandise. The challenge with this method of protecting product is two-fold. First just having an empty box on display does not necessarily mean there is a live corresponding disc to be sold. Two, even though the stores store the discs in alphabetical order, I have personally experienced the wait while associates searched for the item I wanted. I can even recall once when a disc I wanted could not be located. It was a very frustrating experience.
     

I worked for a store that used display cases to stock video games in order to prevent shoplifting. This posed its own unique set of problems. First, some of the games were displayed with the spine of the game facing the customer. The pictures that are designed to pique the interest of potential customers were not visible. I believe this display hampered sales. Next was the display case itself…it was locked. If a customer wanted to look at merchandise they had to try to get an employee’s attention in order to open the showcase. Yes, showcases prevent shoplifting and I would contend they prevent sales as well.
     

A slightly better option I see in one retail giant is a game in a lock box attached by a cord to the display case. It does give the shopper a bit more flexibility to look at the game, turn the box over and read the description on the back and seem more information in general. Still the customer is forced to seek assistance from an employee if they want to make a purchase. The showcase itself is still locked. I would not mind this option so much if there was always someone standing nearby with a key. Unfortunately in the world of retail with tighter payroll budgets, that is not going to happen very often. Thus the advent of the wonderful thing we have come to know as a “call button”. Help is just a push away (and maybe several minutes away depending on how busy the associates are at the time).
     

Then there is the solution I have come to call the dump bin. There is nothing in place to prevent shoplifting in many cases. These tend to be bins filled with older games that may not be quite as popular so they are dumped in one of these containers. Customers have to dig and search to look at games. An avalanche may drop everything back on top of the item they had almost reached at the bottom of the mess. In some instances the games may protect games with an electronic article surveillance label which at least is some defense against theft. The problem is that the bad guys will remove the cellophane wrap and take the package and disc. These can then go to stores that buy “used” games for a few bucks each. There is always the internet option for selling or a trade for drugs on the street. Shoplifters are not necessarily picky about how they get money or drugs.
     

The preferred method in my mind to protect games is to use Sensormatic Safers. They look like a storage bag with a locking zipper and basically that is what they are. What is unique about these bags is that they are made of polyethylene and nylon material making them extremely durable. They also have electronic article surveillance built into them ensuring they will work with a Sensormatic security tower system. Why do I like this method of protecting merchandise? Accessibility for customers is the reason. Shoppers can pick up a game in a Safer, look at it from all angles and carry it around the store. They don’t have to wait for someone to help them open a display case just to look at an item they may or may not be interested in purchasing. The merchandise remains secure and the customer is more likely to buy it when they can carry it with them while conducting other shopping.
     

It is important to protect games and high shrink merchandise but it is just as important to ensure your customers have access to merchandise. The longer they have to wait for help or jump through hoops to make a purchase the less likely they will be to shop in your store in the future. Flexible Safers allow you to be flexible with your customers and that has a positive impact on sales and shortage.

 

It is important to protect games and we can help you with it.  Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.