Pre-Employment Screening

Overcoming Objections To Employment Drug Screening Part 2


Employment Drug Screening – 3                                                                                        WC blog 637
Drug testing-3


Overcoming Objections To Employment Drug Screening Part 2
          What are some of the reasons why a store owner would want to have an employment drug screening program? In Part 1 of this series we looked at how to avoid potential legal concerns that could be associated with an employee drug testing program if it is not handled properly. But we also want to explore the why’s for retail owners and managers to want to have a program in place at all. The Canadian Centre for Occupational Safety and Health lists the following problems that can arise from substance abuse in the workplace:
They can have an impact on a person’s judgement, alertness, perception, motor coordination or emotional state that also impacts working safely or safety sensitive decisions.
After-effects of substance abuse can affect job performance.
Absensteeism, illness and/or reduced productivity.
Preoccupation with obtaining and using substances while at work.
Illegal activities at work including selling illicit drugs to other employees.
Psychological or stress-related effects due to substance use by a family member, friend or co-worker that affects another person’s job performance.
(Canadian Centre for Occupational Safety and Health, “Substance Use in the Workplace”).  As can be seen from this listing, allowing your employees to use illegal drugs can create a formidable number of issues. Not only is the employee who is using the substances affected by the substances they abuse but it can impact customers and co-workers and the financial health of the store.

     So what is the best approach to implementing a drug-free workplace? It starts with screening applicants in a pre-employment process. Loss Prevention Systems Inc. has the Applicant Management Center that helps store owners with everything from online job application processing to background investigations. They assist owners with managing the entire hiring process legally and that can include conducting employment drug screening. You, the employer, will not have to worry about whether you have covered all of your bases with the proper documents and signatures. Loss Prevention Systems Inc. has all of the documentation required to provide to your candidates and protects your company from any potential problem. I’ll throw this out there for your consideration LPSI also conducts background investigations so you can be assured the people you are thinking of hiring are clean in more ways than one.

     Let’s explore in more depth the points listed by CCOHS and how each can hurt your business.
Drug use can impair a worker’s judgement, alertness, etc. – I have been in retail for over 28 years and have yet to work in a store that does not have ladders. Consider for a moment what happens if you have an impaired worker climbing a ladder and they fall off. If you have a drug-free workplace you can send that employee for testing. You may be able to avoid any of the related medical expenses (or lawsuits) due to that accident. An employment drug screening program also helps managers prevent hiring substance abusers in the first place.
After effects of substance abuse can affect performance – I cannot count the number of times I have had employees report to work hung over and the time wasted as they muddled their way through the shift. They are slower, they complain and productivity is severely curtailed. That is just the alcohol related cases. I have seen a few similar situations in which I suspected drug use and one where we sent the employee to drug testing. The impact of after effects also has a negative impact on customer interactions. The affected employee is probably not going to be the face of your company you would want representing you or your business to shoppers.
Absenteeism and “illness” are part and parcel of the after effects. According to the National Safety Council, in an article, “Drugs at Work” noted that, “Workers with substance use disorders miss nearly 50% more work days than their peers – up to six weeks annually…”
If preoccupation with obtaining and using substances is the focus of an employee’s time then what are they focused on at your workplace? Chances are you aren’t getting out of them what you are paying them to do.
Illegal activities at work – There is nothing more to add. Nothing good will come of it.
Drug and substance abuse hurt businesses in many ways and all of them place a drain on the bottom line.

     Employers should not be ignoring the importance of drug testing in the workplace. Pre-employment screening protects the employer, the staff and customers from the problems that are associated with illegal drug use. Begin your next job search with a company that can manage your hiring process and screen your candidates adequately.
For more information about employment drug screening contact us or call 1.866.914.2567  



What are some of the reasons why a store owner would want to have an employment drug screening program? In Part 1 of this series we looked at how to avoid potential legal concerns that could be associated with an employee drug testing program if it is not handled properly. But we also want to explore the why’s for retail owners and managers to want to have a program in place at all. The Canadian Centre for Occupational Safety and Health lists the following problems that can arise from substance abuse in the workplace:

They can have an impact on a person’s judgement, alertness, perception, motor coordination or emotional state that also impacts working safely or safety sensitive decisions.

After-effects of substance abuse can affect job performance.

Absensteeism, illness and/or reduced productivity.

Preoccupation with obtaining and using substances while at work.

Illegal activities at work including selling illicit drugs to other employees.

Psychological or stress-related effects due to substance use by a family member, friend or co-worker that affects another person’s job performance.

(Canadian Centre for Occupational Safety and Health, “Substance Use in the Workplace”).  As can be seen from this listing, allowing your employees to use illegal drugs can create a formidable number of issues. Not only is the employee who is using the substances affected by the substances they abuse but it can impact customers and co-workers and the financial health of the store.
     

So what is the best approach to implementing a drug-free workplace? It starts with screening applicants in a pre-employment process. Loss Prevention Systems Inc. has the Applicant Management Center that helps store owners with everything from online job application processing to background investigations. They assist owners with managing the entire hiring process legally and that can include conducting employment drug screening. You, the employer, will not have to worry about whether you have covered all of your bases with the proper documents and signatures. Loss Prevention Systems Inc. has all of the documentation required to provide to your candidates and protects your company from any potential problem. I’ll throw this out there for your consideration LPSI also conducts background investigations so you can be assured the people you are thinking of hiring are clean in more ways than one.
     

Let’s explore in more depth the points listed by CCOHS and how each can hurt your business.

Drug use can impair a worker’s judgement, alertness, etc. – I have been in retail for over 28 years and have yet to work in a store that does not have ladders. Consider for a moment what happens if you have an impaired worker climbing a ladder and they fall off. If you have a drug-free workplace you can send that employee for testing. You may be able to avoid any of the related medical expenses (or lawsuits) due to that accident. An employment drug screening program also helps managers prevent hiring substance abusers in the first place.

After effects of substance abuse can affect performance – I cannot count the number of times I have had employees report to work hung over and the time wasted as they muddled their way through the shift. They are slower, they complain and productivity is severely curtailed. That is just the alcohol related cases. I have seen a few similar situations in which I suspected drug use and one where we sent the employee to drug testing. The impact of after effects also has a negative impact on customer interactions. The affected employee is probably not going to be the face of your company you would want representing you or your business to shoppers.

Absenteeism and “illness” are part and parcel of the after effects. According to the National Safety Council, in an article, “Drugs at Work” noted that, “Workers with substance use disorders miss nearly 50% more work days than their peers – up to six weeks annually…”

If preoccupation with obtaining and using substances is the focus of an employee’s time then what are they focused on at your workplace? Chances are you aren’t getting out of them what you are paying them to do.

Illegal activities at work – There is nothing more to add. Nothing good will come of it.

Drug and substance abuse hurt businesses in many ways and all of them place a drain on the bottom line.
     

Employers should not be ignoring the importance of drug testing in the workplace. Pre-employment screening protects the employer, the staff and customers from the problems that are associated with illegal drug use. Begin your next job search with a company that can manage your hiring process and screen your candidates adequately.

 

For more information about employment drug screening contact us or call 1.866.914.2567  



 

Top Hiring Mistakes Include Failing To Conduct A Background Investigation

 

Pre-Employment Screening-3                                                                                   WC Blog 633
Background Investigation-4
Top Hiring Mistakes Include Failing To Conduct A Background Investigation
     One of the top hiring mistakes I have seen from employers is the failure to conduct pre-employment screening on prospective job candidates. There are a number of unforeseen problems that can and often do manifest themselves only after a new employee is brought on the team. There are also consequences for employers that make hiring mistakes, like losing great candidates. From an article in Business News Daily by Sammi Caramela, January 8, 2018, “Hiring? Avoid These 7 Common Mistakes”, the writer mentions several that jumped out at me and one that I have been guilty of committing. Among those mentioned by the writer:
Trusting first impressions – It is not unheard of for a manager to be influenced by the first impression a candidate gives to them. 
Lacking transparency – This applies the business failing to be clear about the job and what it may entail. Applicants should have a realistic understanding of the position. 
Forgetting to highlight culture – Ms. Caramela points out that businesses may neglect to promote the “style and culture” of the company which can include salary, benefits and even perks. For example, a flexible work schedule may be something that could appeal to some strong candidates.
Being too narrow in your search – The writer reminds us that hiring a diverse team means being open to hiring various age groups, races, genders, etc. Expanding the background of the people on a team brings in new ideas and perspectives.
These are excellent reminders that managers should consider as they post job ads and begin the interviewing process. What the article failed to mention is that not completing a background investigation is also a common mistake.
     Pre-employment screening is more than an employer calling the contacts or references listed on an applicant’s resume. It involves a deeper dive into the candidate’s past. This may involve a driver history, a credit report and even a criminal background check. As an employer you might not want someone who is a partaker of illegal drugs working for you. A screening can include drug testing of candidates prior to welcoming them on board. Looking into a person’s past can uncover information that the person may have been attempting to conceal from you. Why would they do that? Some people may have convictions for crimes and believe they would not be considered for a job if they noted it on an application. Someone may job hop because they have an inability to control their temper and they have been fired multiple times. They list a reference as someone they know who will pretend to have been a supervisor. A background investigation by a reputable company that specializes in them can discover these types of deceptions. A hiring manager may not recognize that the reference is not a credible source of information. Screening applicants improves the chances that a candidate under consideration for a position will be a good choice and not one that will carry negative consequences.
     So which of the five mistakes listed have I been guilty of committing? I confess in the past I have erred by trusting the first impression of a job applicant. This candidate had an outgoing personality, he maintained eye contact with me and according to his resume he had prior Loss Prevention experience. We conducted an interview in which he did really well, answering questions with strong responses. A preliminary job offer was made and when the company’s background check was complete we started his training. Over the next two months the employee made several poor decisions and I eventually had to fire him. It was only after his departure I learned through a second-hand source that the former employee had been fired from a job in Florida under questionable circumstances. I learned that the background investigation completed by our company or whoever they contracted with were not very thorough. Had the check been more complete the details of a gap in employment may have been uncovered. I may have also been alerted to the incident that led to his alleged dismissal. I still have to admit I was blinded by my first impression and that was my own fault.
           Don’t make hiring mistakes that can hurt your business. Be open to hiring people with different perspectives. Be clear in what the job you are filling really requires of an employee, highlight the benefits of working for your business and don’t be sucked in by first impressions. Finally, be sure that an experienced company conducts pre-employment screening of job candidates you are considering. In-depth screening ensures applicants with sketchy backgrounds are removed from your applicant pool and only the best remain.
A background investigation is important and we can help you with it. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.
     

One of the top hiring mistakes I have seen from employers is the failure to conduct pre-employment screening on prospective job candidates. There are a number of unforeseen problems that can and often do manifest themselves only after a new employee is brought on the team. There are also consequences for employers that make hiring mistakes, like losing great candidates. From an article in Business News Daily by Sammi Caramela, January 8, 2018, “Hiring? Avoid These 7 Common Mistakes”, the writer mentions several that jumped out at me and one that I have been guilty of committing. Among those mentioned by the writer:

Trusting first impressions – It is not unheard of for a manager to be influenced by the first impression a candidate gives to them. 

Lacking transparency – This applies the business failing to be clear about the job and what it may entail. Applicants should have a realistic understanding of the position. 

Forgetting to highlight culture – Ms. Caramela points out that businesses may neglect to promote the “style and culture” of the company which can include salary, benefits and even perks. For example, a flexible work schedule may be something that could appeal to some strong candidates.

Being too narrow in your search – The writer reminds us that hiring a diverse team means being open to hiring various age groups, races, genders, etc. Expanding the background of the people on a team brings in new ideas and perspectives.

These are excellent reminders that managers should consider as they post job ads and begin the interviewing process. What the article failed to mention is that not completing a background investigation is also a common mistake.

Pre-employment screening is more than an employer calling the contacts or references listed on an applicant’s resume. It involves a deeper dive into the candidate’s past. This may involve a driver history, a credit report and even a criminal background check. As an employer you might not want someone who is a partaker of illegal drugs working for you. A screening can include drug testing of candidates prior to welcoming them on board. Looking into a person’s past can uncover information that the person may have been attempting to conceal from you. Why would they do that? Some people may have convictions for crimes and believe they would not be considered for a job if they noted it on an application. Someone may job hop because they have an inability to control their temper and they have been fired multiple times. They list a reference as someone they know who will pretend to have been a supervisor. A background investigation by a reputable company that specializes in them can discover these types of deceptions. A hiring manager may not recognize that the reference is not a credible source of information. Screening applicants improves the chances that a candidate under consideration for a position will be a good choice and not one that will carry negative consequences.

So which of the five mistakes listed have I been guilty of committing? I confess in the past I have erred by trusting the first impression of a job applicant. This candidate had an outgoing personality, he maintained eye contact with me and according to his resume he had prior Loss Prevention experience. We conducted an interview in which he did really well, answering questions with strong responses. A preliminary job offer was made and when the company’s background check was complete we started his training. Over the next two months the employee made several poor decisions and I eventually had to fire him. It was only after his departure I learned through a second-hand source that the former employee had been fired from a job in Florida under questionable circumstances. I learned that the background investigation completed by our company or whoever they contracted with were not very thorough. Had the check been more complete the details of a gap in employment may have been uncovered. I may have also been alerted to the incident that led to his alleged dismissal. I still have to admit I was blinded by my first impression and that was my own fault.

Don’t make hiring mistakes that can hurt your business. Be open to hiring people with different perspectives. Be clear in what the job you are filling really requires of an employee, highlight the benefits of working for your business and don’t be sucked in by first impressions. Finally, be sure that an experienced company conducts pre-employment screening of job candidates you are considering. In-depth screening ensures applicants with sketchy backgrounds are removed from your applicant pool and only the best remain.

 

A background investigation is important and we can help you with it. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.     

 

 

Sensormatic Systems Remove Opportunity For Theft Part 2

Stop shoplifting-3                                                                                                           WC Blog 689
Sensormatic System – 3


Sensormatic Systems Remove Opportunity For Theft Part 2

     In the first article we discussed how removing opportunity can stop shoplifting and employee theft. The article came about because of a story I read from Loss Prevention Magazine in which the author discussed this very topic. He made valid arguments about the expense of analytical data to try to determine methods for addressing theft and tracking potential opportunities for theft to occur. He then focused on one strategy for internal theft reduction which I did not take any issue with. I encourage you to read Part 1 of this series so you can find the story I am referencing, it could prove useful to business owners. I then discussed my perspective on data and analytics and how it can become a time consuming task to review all of the information and then make it actionable. Opportunity for employee theft starts in the hiring process and then in the building design and finally how operations of the store work. The author of the article I read would probably be in agreement with me about the employment part but he feels that the labor pool is becoming smaller to choose from with the economy improving.

     The first solution to stop shoplifting and employee theft I proposed in Part 1 was the installation of new Sensormatic systems in stores. Not only do new electronic article surveillance towers at the entrance and exits of a store let potential thieves know you are serious about crime, they also let store workers know when an attempted theft is taking place. They don’t discriminate between employees and customers. Anyone trying to take merchandise out that is tagged will activate an alarm.  These systems remove opportunity one of the key elements necessary for criminals who want to steal. In Part 1 I also told readers that the best source to go to for Sensormatic systems is Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. (LPSI). LPSI is a company that has been helping retailers with shrink management and theft reduction for over 30 years. They are well equipped to give advice on anti-theft equipment and other methods to curb theft. This leads me to another issue mentioned in the Loss Prevention Magazine article the writer’s argument about hiring being a factor that employers have little control over in terms of opportunity.

     I don’t agree that as a “labor market continues to tighten there is little opportunity for retailers to take serious aim at losses from employee theft through more selective hiring” as posed by that author. I believe that the use of pre-employment screening and drug screening of applicants is still a viable option for retail owners and managers. Both of these tools are offered by LPSI as part of a larger strategy to reduce theft and shortage. A pre-employment screening is an opportunity to dig into verifying what an applicant has put on an application or in some cases finding out what was left off an application. There are a number of benefits in conducting background checks but the most important thing to know is it can reduce your chances of hiring criminals. An applicant drug screening helps minimize the chance of hiring a person who uses illegal substances who may take an opportunity to steal from your store to satisfy an addiction. Failing to screen for both of these opens an unnecessary opportunity for a crook to gain employment with your business. Combine the three, Sensormatic Systems, pre-employment background checks and drug screening and you have the makings of a truly impactful anti-theft strategy.

     Give a thief an opportunity and he or she will take it and run. Whether you are trying to stop shoplifting or internal theft the tools are available to you to keep it out of your shop. LPSI has those tools and can also assess your business for you to see if there are any other opportunities that have been overlooked. Hire the right people, get the right equipment and hear the right advice and  you will create new opportunities to grow your business.
Get more information on Sensormatic systems, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today. 

In the first article we discussed how removing opportunity can stop shoplifting and employee theft. The article came about because of a story I read from Loss Prevention Magazine in which the author discussed this very topic. He made valid arguments about the expense of analytical data to try to determine methods for addressing theft and tracking potential opportunities for theft to occur. He then focused on one strategy for internal theft reduction which I did not take any issue with. I encourage you to read Part 1 of this series so you can find the story I am referencing, it could prove useful to business owners. I then discussed my perspective on data and analytics and how it can become a time consuming task to review all of the information and then make it actionable. Opportunity for employee theft starts in the hiring process and then in the building design and finally how operations of the store work. The author of the article I read would probably be in agreement with me about the employment part but he feels that the labor pool is becoming smaller to choose from with the economy improving.
     

The first solution to stop shoplifting and employee theft I proposed in Part 1 was the installation of new Sensormatic systems in stores. Not only do new electronic article surveillance towers at the entrance and exits of a store let potential thieves know you are serious about crime, they also let store workers know when an attempted theft is taking place. They don’t discriminate between employees and customers. Anyone trying to take merchandise out that is tagged will activate an alarm.  These systems remove opportunity one of the key elements necessary for criminals who want to steal. In Part 1 I also told readers that the best source to go to for Sensormatic systems is Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. (LPSI). LPSI is a company that has been helping retailers with shrink management and theft reduction for over 30 years. They are well equipped to give advice on anti-theft equipment and other methods to curb theft. This leads me to another issue mentioned in the Loss Prevention Magazine article the writer’s argument about hiring being a factor that employers have little control over in terms of opportunity.
     

I don’t agree that as a “labor market continues to tighten there is little opportunity for retailers to take serious aim at losses from employee theft through more selective hiring” as posed by that author. I believe that the use of pre-employment screening and drug screening of applicants is still a viable option for retail owners and managers. Both of these tools are offered by LPSI as part of a larger strategy to reduce theft and shortage. A pre-employment screening is an opportunity to dig into verifying what an applicant has put on an application or in some cases finding out what was left off an application. There are a number of benefits in conducting background checks but the most important thing to know is it can reduce your chances of hiring criminals. An applicant drug screening helps minimize the chance of hiring a person who uses illegal substances who may take an opportunity to steal from your store to satisfy an addiction. Failing to screen for both of these opens an unnecessary opportunity for a crook to gain employment with your business. Combine the three, Sensormatic Systems, pre-employment background checks and drug screening and you have the makings of a truly impactful anti-theft strategy.
     

Give a thief an opportunity and he or she will take it and run. Whether you are trying to stop shoplifting or internal theft the tools are available to you to keep it out of your shop. LPSI has those tools and can also assess your business for you to see if there are any other opportunities that have been overlooked. Hire the right people, get the right equipment and hear the right advice and  you will create new opportunities to grow your business.

 

Get more information on Sensormatic systems, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.