electronic article surveillance

Don’t Settle For Stagnant Shortage Results – Use Sensormatic Labels

 

Sensormatic labels -4                                                                                                 wc blog 741
Stop Shoplifting – 3
Don’t Settle For Stagnant Shortage Results – Use Sensormatic Labels
     If I were to ask retail owners if they would like to stop shoplifting from taking place in their stores I feel certain I would receive a 100% response in the affirmative. I would also guarantee a 100% affirmative response if I were to ask retailers if they would like to increase profits. Interestingly to me however is the fact that a recent 2018 National Retail Security Survey, found that there was a 22.2% decrease in the use of “Acousto-magnetic, electronic security tags” from 2017-2018 (pg. 10). This category would include Sensormatic labels of all types, including the HBC labels for health and beauty products and the Ultra strip III rolls. Now before I hit the panic button let me be clear, there were increases in other categories of Retail Loss Prevention Systems. For example the report listed budget increases for “Theft deterrent devices” which would include Sensormatic Safers, wraps, etc. So not all areas of retail theft protection have been neglected but the reporting that a 22.2% decrease in acousto-magnetic tag spending is concerning to me. As a former Loss Prevention Manager I believe this is a poor decision on the part of retailers.
     The report indicates that shortage remains about flat to previous years at 1.33% (pg.5). Let me ask you a question, if your store sales remained flat to previous years would you be excited about this? Certainly not! You would take steps to improve profits. Well, shrink reduction is one place to start and it can be done quickly and results will be seen almost immediately. Bringing that 1.33% down by half is not unreasonable. Remember, that percentage is an average percentage for retailers. Your store(s) could very well be experiencing shrink much higher than this. As we break down shortage we find from the report that external theft accounted for 36.5% of store losses in 2017. Internal theft or employee theft resulted in an additional 30% of store losses. Combined, on average this could be 66.5% of your merchandise shortage and does not include an estimated 5.4% attributed to vendor theft or fraud. Bill Bregar, owner of Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. knows how theft takes a significant bite out of store profits. Bill has developed and operated Loss Prevention programs at the National Director level for major retailers. He draws on that experience to help business owners improve their profits through improved sales and reduced shortage. Like me, Bill DOES recommend the use of Sensormatic labels and hard tags to prevent shoplifting and internal theft to his clients.
     I mentioned that you could bring shrink down by almost half and it can be done quickly. Bill agrees with me here as well and if you will take a look at the ROI calculator on the Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. website you will see that is the amount his company estimates you would reduce shrink by if you were to install a retail anti-theft system and use Sensormatic labels and tags. Sitting stagnate and accepting 1.33% losses is an unacceptable proposition when that figure can be easily improved upon. 
     One other aspect of the report that concerned me is that approximately 42% of stores in this survey experienced shrinkage of 1.5% and higher (with 9% of stores experiencing over 3% in shortage) (pg. 5). And what are some of the types of anti-theft measures that are increasingly being used in stores? “Simulated, visible CCTV” and “Observation mirrors” are listed as seeing a 27.0% and 9% increase since 2017 respectively (pg. 10). I have nothing against CCTV or the use of mirrors in stores. I used live CCTV and recorded video to catch shoplifters and dishonest employees. Mirrors can help with seeing corners that may be out of the line of sight of employees. Using simulated CCTV may deter a minimal amount of theft but Sensormatic labels are a much more effective method to stop shoplifting. They act as a deterrent AND they set off alarm towers providing trained employees an opportunity to recover merchandise before it gets out the door. Mirrors are only effective if employees are watching them and going to those corners but do your employees have time to be watching mirrors? Unless you have a Loss Prevention Associate working the benefits are negligible at best.
     Investing in a Sensormatic system is the smart choice for store owners. They are proven to stop shoplifting and employee theft. I have first-hand experience recovering merchandise that was going to be stolen had an electronic article surveillance alarm not set off an alarm tower. Don’t waste money on technology that will not provide the same results. Keep merchandise out of the hands of thieves and in the store where it will be bought and see sales soar. Invest in Sensormatic security systems!
Need information on Sensormatic labels? Give us a call at 1.866.914.2567 now.

If I were to ask retail owners if they would like to stop shoplifting from taking place in their stores I feel certain I would receive a 100% response in the affirmative. I would also guarantee a 100% affirmative response if I were to ask retailers if they would like to increase profits. Interestingly to me however is the fact that a recent 2018 National Retail Security Survey, found that there was a 22.2% decrease in the use of “Acousto-magnetic, electronic security tags” from 2017-2018 (pg. 10). This category would include Sensormatic labels of all types, including the HBC labels for health and beauty products and the Ultra strip III rolls. Now before I hit the panic button let me be clear, there were increases in other categories of Retail Loss Prevention Systems. For example the report listed budget increases for “Theft deterrent devices” which would include Sensormatic Safers, wraps, etc. So not all areas of retail theft protection have been neglected but the reporting that a 22.2% decrease in acousto-magnetic tag spending is concerning to me. As a former Loss Prevention Manager I believe this is a poor decision on the part of retailers.

The report indicates that shortage remains about flat to previous years at 1.33% (pg.5). Let me ask you a question, if your store sales remained flat to previous years would you be excited about this? Certainly not! You would take steps to improve profits. Well, shrink reduction is one place to start and it can be done quickly and results will be seen almost immediately. Bringing that 1.33% down by half is not unreasonable. Remember, that percentage is an average percentage for retailers. Your store(s) could very well be experiencing shrink much higher than this. As we break down shortage we find from the report that external theft accounted for 36.5% of store losses in 2017. Internal theft or employee theft resulted in an additional 30% of store losses. Combined, on average this could be 66.5% of your merchandise shortage and does not include an estimated 5.4% attributed to vendor theft or fraud. Bill Bregar, owner of Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. knows how theft takes a significant bite out of store profits. Bill has developed and operated Loss Prevention programs at the National Director level for major retailers. He draws on that experience to help business owners improve their profits through improved sales and reduced shortage. Like me, Bill DOES recommend the use of Sensormatic labels and hard tags to prevent shoplifting and internal theft to his clients.

I mentioned that you could bring shrink down by almost half and it can be done quickly. Bill agrees with me here as well and if you will take a look at the ROI calculator on the Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. website you will see that is the amount his company estimates you would reduce shrink by if you were to install a retail anti-theft system and use Sensormatic labels and tags. Sitting stagnate and accepting 1.33% losses is an unacceptable proposition when that figure can be easily improved upon. 

One other aspect of the report that concerned me is that approximately 42% of stores in this survey experienced shrinkage of 1.5% and higher (with 9% of stores experiencing over 3% in shortage) (pg. 5). And what are some of the types of anti-theft measures that are increasingly being used in stores? “Simulated, visible CCTV” and “Observation mirrors” are listed as seeing a 27.0% and 9% increase since 2017 respectively (pg. 10). I have nothing against CCTV or the use of mirrors in stores. I used live CCTV and recorded video to catch shoplifters and dishonest employees. Mirrors can help with seeing corners that may be out of the line of sight of employees. Using simulated CCTV may deter a minimal amount of theft but Sensormatic labels are a much more effective method to stop shoplifting. They act as a deterrent AND they set off alarm towers providing trained employees an opportunity to recover merchandise before it gets out the door. Mirrors are only effective if employees are watching them and going to those corners but do your employees have time to be watching mirrors? Unless you have a Loss Prevention Associate working the benefits are negligible at best.

Investing in a Sensormatic system is the smart choice for store owners. They are proven to stop shoplifting and employee theft. I have first-hand experience recovering merchandise that was going to be stolen had an electronic article surveillance alarm not set off an alarm tower. Don’t waste money on technology that will not provide the same results. Keep merchandise out of the hands of thieves and in the store where it will be bought and see sales soar. Invest in Sensormatic security systems!

 

Need information on Sensormatic labels? Give us a call at 1.866.914.2567 now.

 

 

Don’t Irritate Customers With Poor Merchandise Protection – Use Sensormatic Safers Part 1



Sensormatic Safers – 4                                                                                        WC Blog 737
Retail Anti-Theft Devices – 3

Don’t Irritate Customers With Poor Merchandise Protection – Use Sensormatic Safers Part 1

     Of the top ways retailers can avoid irritating me, many of them can be avoided simply by using Sensormatic Safers. Oh, there are a lot of things that get on my nerves but here are some of the biggies. I will expound on what merchants can do to improve these areas in a minute.
Recently I have had a dickens of a time finding a particular store brand of Dramamine for my wife. Every one of this company’s locations around my area has had empty shelves. That’s either a LOT of people with motion sickness, a poor job of getting back in stock or a theft issue.
Stores with 20+ checklanes and only 6 open along with self-checkout stands and lines are queued up extending 5 or more customers deep.
Stores that carry multiple brands of a specific item such as a flash drive or ink jet printer cartridge and choose to protect one brand but not the other against theft, what are they thinking?
Dump bins of DVD’s that I believe are 4 feet deep as I nearly fall in trying like an idiot to find “a really good” movie…in a DUMP bin of DVD’s!
Waiting to find an associate to unlock a locking peghook so I can purchase an Xbox game card that has NO value until it is rung up at the cash register.
Each of these things irks me and I find it is a good time to bring it up because they have all happened to me recently. What frustrates me as a former Loss Prevention Manager is that the use of retail anti-theft devices could prevent several of these irritants.

     When it comes to merchandise accessibility putting products on a locking peghook is no different than using a locking showcase. If something is expensive enough to warrant the use of a locking peghook there is a better solution for your store. Sensormatic Safers provide the same level of protection (I would argue better and I will expand on that later) and they improve service for customers AND store personnel. As a Loss Prevention Manager I had the experience of using different retail anti-theft devices and one of those was the locking peghook. It was a good idea at the time. Shoplifters were able to just remove an item from a peg, take it somewhere in the store and hide it. Professional shoplifters in Organized Retail Crime (ORC) groups would sweep a peghook clean of ALL the items on it. Think about losing a peghook filled with $10 packs of lithium batteries…that can add up to a LOT of money. Locking peghooks allowed us to restrict access to the goods because they required an employee with a detachment key to open the hook and ring the purchase at the register. The problem is this is exactly what you do with a locking display case. Customers are forced to wait for an available associate who may be busy helping someone else and eventually that customer leaves. That is a huge blow to sales and it is also a good way to lose customers won’t return to your store. 

     Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. (LPSI) is a company that was built with the objective of helping retail owners stop theft and also improve sales. Bill Bregar, who founded LPSI was in the Retail Loss Prevention field for years as a National Director of Loss Prevention for several large retailers. He keeps abreast of the best retail anti-theft devices on the market and recommends them to his clients to help them get the best protection and improve upon the service offered by the store. Both are used to foster reduced shortage and increased sales. One of the products recently added to the list of recommendations are Sensormatic Safers. These devices have electronic article surveillance (EAS) technology embedded in them so that stores equipped with Sensormatic towers at their doors will activate alarms if a Safer protected item is carried too close to the towers. Don’t worry of you don’t have a Sensormatic security system, LPSI can help you with that too. If you are fretting over the cost of a system don’t, visit their website and checkout the ROI Calculator. It is an amazing tool that is free to use and will show you how affordable a system is.

     In Part 2, I will discuss more about the advantages of Sensormatic Safers versus trying to use alternative protections like showcases and locking peghooks. Suffice it to say if I am frustrated waiting for service for a locked up item there are more me’s out there and they may have shorter fuses than I do. Do yourself a favor, read Part 2 of this series and see how a Safer can boost sales and reduce theft.
Get more information on Sensormatic Safers, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.

     
     

Of the top ways retailers can avoid irritating me, many of them can be avoided simply by using Sensormatic Safers. Oh, there are a lot of things that get on my nerves but here are some of the biggies. I will expound on what merchants can do to improve these areas in a minute.

Recently I have had a dickens of a time finding a particular store brand of Dramamine for my wife. Every one of this company’s locations around my area has had empty shelves. That’s either a LOT of people with motion sickness, a poor job of getting back in stock or a theft issue.

Stores with 20+ checklanes and only 6 open along with self-checkout stands and lines are queued up extending 5 or more customers deep.

Stores that carry multiple brands of a specific item such as a flash drive or ink jet printer cartridge and choose to protect one brand but not the other against theft, what are they thinking?

Dump bins of DVD’s that I believe are 4 feet deep as I nearly fall in trying like an idiot to find “a really good” movie…in a DUMP bin of DVD’s!

Waiting to find an associate to unlock a locking peghook so I can purchase an Xbox game card that has NO value until it is rung up at the cash register.

Each of these things irks me and I find it is a good time to bring it up because they have all happened to me recently. What frustrates me as a former Loss Prevention Manager is that the use of retail anti-theft devices could prevent several of these irritants.
     

When it comes to merchandise accessibility putting products on a locking peghook is no different than using a locking showcase. If something is expensive enough to warrant the use of a locking peghook there is a better solution for your store. Sensormatic Safers provide the same level of protection (I would argue better and I will expand on that later) and they improve service for customers AND store personnel. As a Loss Prevention Manager I had the experience of using different retail anti-theft devices and one of those was the locking peghook. It was a good idea at the time. Shoplifters were able to just remove an item from a peg, take it somewhere in the store and hide it. Professional shoplifters in Organized Retail Crime (ORC) groups would sweep a peghook clean of ALL the items on it. Think about losing a peghook filled with $10 packs of lithium batteries…that can add up to a LOT of money. Locking peghooks allowed us to restrict access to the goods because they required an employee with a detachment key to open the hook and ring the purchase at the register. The problem is this is exactly what you do with a locking display case. Customers are forced to wait for an available associate who may be busy helping someone else and eventually that customer leaves. That is a huge blow to sales and it is also a good way to lose customers who won’t return to your store. 
     

Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. (LPSI) is a company that was built with the objective of helping retail owners stop theft and also improve sales. Bill Bregar, who founded LPSI was in the Retail Loss Prevention field for years as a National Director of Loss Prevention for several large retailers. He keeps abreast of the best retail anti-theft devices on the market and recommends them to his clients to help them get the best protection and improve upon the service offered by the store. Both are used to foster reduced shortage and increased sales. One of the products recently added to the list of recommendations are Sensormatic Safers. These devices have electronic article surveillance (EAS) technology embedded in them so that stores equipped with Sensormatic towers at their doors will activate alarms if a Safer protected item is carried too close to the towers. Don’t worry of you don’t have a Sensormatic security system, LPSI can help you with that too. If you are fretting over the cost of a system don’t, visit their website and checkout the ROI Calculator. It is an amazing tool that is free to use and will show you how affordable a system is.
     

In Part 2, I will discuss more about the advantages of Sensormatic Safers versus trying to use alternative protections like showcases and locking peghooks. Suffice it to say if I am frustrated waiting for service for a locked up item there are more me’s out there and they may have shorter fuses than I do. Do yourself a favor, read Part 2 of this series and see how a Safer can boost sales and reduce theft.

 

Get more information on Sensormatic Safers, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.
          

 

Building A Culture Of Customer Service To Stop Shoplifting And Grow Sales Part 1



Stop Shoplifting – 3                                                                                                            WC Blog 739
Sensormatic Hard Tags – 4

Building A Culture Of Customer Service To Stop Shoplifting And Grow Sales Part 1

     I write about how to stop shoplifting because that is what I am passionate about. I hate theft and I despise what it does to retailers and quite honestly to my wallet. All of us have to pay for the ne’er do wells who choose to take what isn’t theirs for their own selfish reasons. I also like to write about great customer service because I am also passionate about that. I know how good customer service can make a small business a big success. Because my background is wrapped up in Retail Loss Prevention Management and retail sales I know how customer service drives sales and how it can be combined with electronic article surveillance (EAS) tags like Sensormatic hard tags to prevent theft. By using this combination stores will boost sales and reduce inventory shrink which contributes to even more profit.

     It is common for those of us who write on theft prevention to talk about customer service and how it is a means of thwarting criminal activity but what does great customer service really look like? Is it a matter of saying hello to everyone walking into a store? Is it identifiable? I am going to tell you about a recent experience I had that demonstrated exactly what great customer service should look like. It was during a recent visit to Chick-fil-A. I don’t often use company names but they deserve this shout out. It was very busy and I parked my car and went inside. The line of cars at the drive through wrapped all the way around the building. I placed my order and despite the craziness the young woman behind the counter was friendly and took my order and started working on it. I received my food in a reasonable amount of time which I did not expect looking at the crowd and took note that there seemed to be extra people working at that time. I would say they anticipated the traffic they would have and scheduled accordingly. When I went back to my car I noticed two employees were walking up and down the line of cars in the drive through and taking orders by hand and going to the drive up window to deliver them, cutting down the wait time for the drive up orders! I complimented the workers as I drive off. Now I know some of you are curious how a restaurant business can be compared to retail sales and how you stop shoplifting. There are two aspects to the customer service component that applies to both industries. The friendliness of the employees under what could have been stressful circumstances and the planning and staffing of the team for the day both are due to great management and leadership.

     Both types of businesses rely on customers for the survival of the business. If your business model does not recognize the importance of customer service you are going to lose clients and as a retailer you will incur theft from shoplifting. If you protect your merchandise with Sensormatic hard tags and labels and Sensormatic pedestals at your doors you are putting a barrier in place that deters criminal activity. Reduce theft and you keep prices low, pleasing your customers in the process. That is one aspect of good customer service. 

     The other piece of customer service is when management builds a culture where customer service means your team pays attention to the customer. The employees at this business were incredibly busy and yet all were pleasant and able to be friendly to the customers. Had this been a retail environment I am certain that if someone set off alarms due to merchandise having Sensormatic hard tags attached THIS team of employees would have made recoveries of unpaid goods with a smile on their faces. I have worked in stores where alarm activations were ignored or the person was waved out the door with no apology or attempt to determine the cause of the alarm. 

     In Part 2 I will continue this discussion on the value of customer service and the use of Sensormatic hard tags to stop shoplifting. I will also look at the importance of leadership and management in setting the tone for how a store will be perceived by customers and I will touch on the importance of scheduling as a part of a customer service focused culture.
For more information about how to stop shoplifting contact us or call 1.866.914.2567

I write about how to stop shoplifting because that is what I am passionate about. I hate theft and I despise what it does to retailers and quite honestly to my wallet. All of us have to pay for the ne’er do wells who choose to take what isn’t theirs for their own selfish reasons. I also like to write about great customer service because I am also passionate about that. I know how good customer service can make a small business a big success. Because my background is wrapped up in Retail Loss Prevention Management and retail sales I know how customer service drives sales and how it can be combined with electronic article surveillance (EAS) tags like Sensormatic hard tags to prevent theft. By using this combination stores will boost sales and reduce inventory shrink which contributes to even more profit.
     

It is common for those of us who write on theft prevention to talk about customer service and how it is a means of thwarting criminal activity but what does great customer service really look like? Is it a matter of saying hello to everyone walking into a store? Is it identifiable? I am going to tell you about a recent experience I had that demonstrated exactly what great customer service should look like. It was during a recent visit to Chick-fil-A. I don’t often use company names but they deserve this shout out. It was very busy and I parked my car and went inside. The line of cars at the drive through wrapped all the way around the building. I placed my order and despite the craziness the young woman behind the counter was friendly and took my order and started working on it. I received my food in a reasonable amount of time which I did not expect looking at the crowd and took note that there seemed to be extra people working at that time. I would say they anticipated the traffic they would have and scheduled accordingly. When I went back to my car I noticed two employees were walking up and down the line of cars in the drive through and taking orders by hand and going to the drive up window to deliver them, cutting down the wait time for the drive up orders! I complimented the workers as I drive off. Now I know some of you are curious how a restaurant business can be compared to retail sales and how you stop shoplifting. There are two aspects to the customer service component that applies to both industries. The friendliness of the employees under what could have been stressful circumstances and the planning and staffing of the team for the day both are due to great management and leadership.
     

Both types of businesses rely on customers for the survival of the business. If your business model does not recognize the importance of customer service you are going to lose clients and as a retailer you will incur theft from shoplifting. If you protect your merchandise with Sensormatic hard tags and labels and Sensormatic pedestals at your doors you are putting a barrier in place that deters criminal activity. Reduce theft and you keep prices low, pleasing your customers in the process. That is one aspect of good customer service. 
     

The other piece of customer service is when management builds a culture where customer service means your team pays attention to the customer. The employees at this business were incredibly busy and yet all were pleasant and able to be friendly to the customers. Had this been a retail environment I am certain that if someone set off alarms due to merchandise having Sensormatic hard tags attached THIS team of employees would have made recoveries of unpaid goods with a smile on their faces. I have worked in stores where alarm activations were ignored or the person was waved out the door with no apology or attempt to determine the cause of the alarm. 
     

In Part 2 I will continue this discussion on the value of customer service and the use of Sensormatic hard tags to stop shoplifting. I will also look at the importance of leadership and management in setting the tone for how a store will be perceived by customers and I will touch on the importance of scheduling as a part of a customer service focused culture.

 

For more information about how to stop shoplifting, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567