electronic article surveillance

Cure Lengthy Checkout Lines Using Retail Traffic Counting Devices

Retail Traffic Counting-3                                                                                                    wc blog 844
Door Counting Sensor-4

Cure Lengthy Checkout Lines Using Retail Traffic Counting Devices

     How many times when I am standing in a long line to check out in a retail store do I wish I had a personal retail traffic counting device. I want to know how many people are in front of me and why there are other lines that are just as long with a minimum number of cashiers working. Oh it is really easy to dismiss it as a fluke and I just happened to get in at the wrong time but when it happens over and over again it isn’t a fluke. It is poor staffing and scheduling by some scheduling manager or it may be the result of an automated scheduling system. The worse-case scenario in my mind is someone creating a cashier schedule with no concept of customer traffic patterns. It is those situations when a door counting sensor would be a help.

     Consider the difference it would make if a store was basing scheduling not off of an equal allocation of budget dollars for each day of the week but rather on the flow of customer traffic. Is 4:00pm on a Monday afternoon in the winter the same as 4:00pm on a Monday in the summer? Living in a tourist town I can say for certain it is not. Customer traffic is much different here based on seasonal activity and by the days of the week. Saturday at 1:00pm for a store can look nothing like 1:00pm on a Tuesday. If you don’t believe me try strolling through your local mall on those days and see what I mean. The same holds true for your own store. Your traffic patterns are not going to be the same every day. If you are scheduling your team as though the days are all the same you are probably hurting sales and losing more merchandise to shoplifters. The fix is easy and only requires a retail traffic counting device be attached to your Sensormatic security system.

     A door counting sensor will enable store owners to see how many people are entering the store and at what time of the day/night they are coming in. Schedules can be created around those hours. Now, think about me standing in that long line at the local big box store. There are too few cashiers for the number of patrons because of some scheduling screw-up. Using retail traffic counting managers can begin evaluating the shopping patterns of clientele. Open the doors at 8:00am and you may only need a single cashier until 10:00am. You may have had two cashiers in the past but numbers show that only one is necessary. Perhaps you choose to put that two hours of payroll into your 5:00pm-7:00pm shift. Maybe you add it to your Saturday at 1:00pm when you have more customers. Wait lines go down and shoppers are happier. Happier customers are willing to return and spend money.

     Lest I neglect to mention it the use of a door counting sensor can also help in decreasing theft in a store as well as cut down checkout wait times. If shortage due to theft is believed to be a concern it could be because shoplifters are taking advantage of the busy times of the day. If the store does not have adequate coverage on the salesfloor during peak hours crooks will find it much easier to steal from a business. Using the data from a door counting sensor managers can better spread the salesfloor coverage around to impact those busier days and hours. That translates to improved customer service reducing opportunities to steal while enhancing the opportunities to increase sales through suggestive selling and add-on sales.

     Retail traffic counting can have a tremendous impact on a store. When used properly it can enhance the customer service satisfaction of your patrons by helping to allocate payroll dollars to the times when you have more shoppers in the store. When used with a Sensormatic security system camera it can help in tracking electronic article surveillance alarm activity and employee response to those alarms. It can also assist in improving salesfloor staffing to ensure shoplifters are deterred through better customer service. That will drive up sales and decrease theft and who can argue with that?
Door counting sensors are important and we can help you with them. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.

How many times when I am standing in a long line to check out in a retail store do I wish I had a personal retail traffic counting device. I want to know how many people are in front of me and why there are other lines that are just as long with a minimum number of cashiers working. Oh it is really easy to dismiss it as a fluke and I just happened to get in at the wrong time but when it happens over and over again it isn’t a fluke. It is poor staffing and scheduling by some scheduling manager or it may be the result of an automated scheduling system. The worse-case scenario in my mind is someone creating a cashier schedule with no concept of customer traffic patterns. It is those situations when a door counting sensor would be a help.
     

Consider the difference it would make if a store was basing scheduling not off of an equal allocation of budget dollars for each day of the week but rather on the flow of customer traffic. Is 4:00pm on a Monday afternoon in the winter the same as 4:00pm on a Monday in the summer? Living in a tourist town I can say for certain it is not. Customer traffic is much different here based on seasonal activity and by the days of the week. Saturday at 1:00pm for a store can look nothing like 1:00pm on a Tuesday. If you don’t believe me try strolling through your local mall on those days and see what I mean. The same holds true for your own store. Your traffic patterns are not going to be the same every day. If you are scheduling your team as though the days are all the same you are probably hurting sales and losing more merchandise to shoplifters. The fix is easy and only requires a retail traffic counting device be attached to your Sensormatic security system.
     

A door counting sensor will enable store owners to see how many people are entering the store and at what time of the day/night they are coming in. Schedules can be created around those hours. Now, think about me standing in that long line at the local big box store. There are too few cashiers for the number of patrons because of some scheduling screw-up. Using retail traffic counting managers can begin evaluating the shopping patterns of clientele. Open the doors at 8:00am and you may only need a single cashier until 10:00am. You may have had two cashiers in the past but numbers show that only one is necessary. Perhaps you choose to put that two hours of payroll into your 5:00pm-7:00pm shift. Maybe you add it to your Saturday at 1:00pm when you have more customers. Wait lines go down and shoppers are happier. Happier customers are willing to return and spend money.
     

Lest I neglect to mention it the use of a door counting sensor can also help in decreasing theft in a store as well as cut down checkout wait times. If shortage due to theft is believed to be a concern it could be because shoplifters are taking advantage of the busy times of the day. If the store does not have adequate coverage on the salesfloor during peak hours crooks will find it much easier to steal from a business. Using the data from a door counting sensor managers can better spread the salesfloor coverage around to impact those busier days and hours. That translates to improved customer service reducing opportunities to steal while enhancing the opportunities to increase sales through suggestive selling and add-on sales.
     

Retail traffic counting can have a tremendous impact on a store. When used properly it can enhance the customer service satisfaction of your patrons by helping to allocate payroll dollars to the times when you have more shoppers in the store. When used with a Sensormatic security system camera it can help in tracking electronic article surveillance alarm activity and employee response to those alarms. It can also assist in improving salesfloor staffing to ensure shoplifters are deterred through better customer service. That will drive up sales and decrease theft and who can argue with that?

 

Door counting sensors are important and we can help you with them. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.

 

Not All Solutions To Protect Games Are Equal


Protect Games – 4                                                                                                     WC Blog 839
Prevent Shoplifting – 3

Not All Solutions To Protect Games Are Equal

         I am a fan of video games but when it comes to shoplifting I don’t play games and I look for the ways stores protect games. I am aware of one chain store that stocks only empty display boxes on shelves to protect the merchandise. The challenge with this method of protecting product is two-fold. First just having an empty box on display does not necessarily mean there is a live corresponding disc to be sold. Two, even though the stores store the discs in alphabetical order, I have personally experienced the wait while associates searched for the item I wanted. I can even recall once when a disc I wanted could not be located. It was a very frustrating experience.

     I worked for a store that used display cases to stock video games in order to prevent shoplifting. This posed its own unique set of problems. First, some of the games were displayed with the spine of the game facing the customer. The pictures that are designed to pique the interest of potential customers were not visible. I believe this display hampered sales. Next was the display case itself…it was locked. If a customer wanted to look at merchandise they had to try to get an employee’s attention in order to open the showcase. Yes, showcases prevent shoplifting and I would contend they prevent sales as well.

      A slightly better option I see in one retail giant is a game in a lock box attached by a cord to the display case. It does give the shopper a bit more flexibility to look at the game, turn the box over and read the description on the back and seem more information in general. Still the customer is forced to seek assistance from an employee if they want to make a purchase. The showcase itself is still locked. I would not mind this option so much if there was always someone standing nearby with a key. Unfortunately in the world of retail with tighter payroll budgets, that is not going to happen very often. Thus the advent of the wonderful thing we have come to know as a “call button”. Help is just a push away (and maybe several minutes away depending on how busy the associates are at the time).

     Then there is the solution I have come to call the dump bin. There is nothing in place to prevent shoplifting in many cases. These tend to be bins filled with older games that may not be quite as popular so they are dumped in one of these containers. Customers have to dig and search to look at games. An avalanche may drop everything back on top of the item they had almost reached at the bottom of the mess. In some instances the games may protect games with an electronic article surveillance label which at least is some defense against theft. The problem is that the bad guys will remove the cellophane wrap and take the package and disc. These can then go to stores that buy “used” games for a few bucks each. There is always the internet option for selling or a trade for drugs on the street. Shoplifters are not necessarily picky about how they get money or drugs.

     The preferred method in my mind to protect games is to use Sensormatic Safers. They look like a storage bag with a locking zipper and basically that is what they are. What is unique about these bags is that they are made of polyethylene and nylon material making them extremely durable. They also have electronic article surveillance built into them ensuring they will work with a Sensormatic security tower system. Why do I like this method of protecting merchandise? Accessibility for customers is the reason. Shoppers can pick up a game in a Safer, look at it from all angles and carry it around the store. They don’t have to wait for someone to help them open a display case just to look at an item they may or may not be interested in purchasing. The merchandise remains secure and the customer is more likely to buy it when they can carry it with them while conducting other shopping.

      It is important to protect games and high shrink merchandise but it is just as important to ensure your customers have access to merchandise. The longer they have to wait for help or jump through hoops to make a purchase the less likely they will be to shop in your store in the future. Flexible Safers allow you to be flexible with your customers and that has a positive impact on sales and shortage.

It is important to protect games and we can help you with it.  Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.   

I am a fan of video games but when it comes to shoplifting I don’t play games and I look for the ways stores protect games. I am aware of one chain store that stocks only empty display boxes on shelves to protect the merchandise. The challenge with this method of protecting product is two-fold. First just having an empty box on display does not necessarily mean there is a live corresponding disc to be sold. Two, even though the stores store the discs in alphabetical order, I have personally experienced the wait while associates searched for the item I wanted. I can even recall once when a disc I wanted could not be located. It was a very frustrating experience.
     

I worked for a store that used display cases to stock video games in order to prevent shoplifting. This posed its own unique set of problems. First, some of the games were displayed with the spine of the game facing the customer. The pictures that are designed to pique the interest of potential customers were not visible. I believe this display hampered sales. Next was the display case itself…it was locked. If a customer wanted to look at merchandise they had to try to get an employee’s attention in order to open the showcase. Yes, showcases prevent shoplifting and I would contend they prevent sales as well.
     

A slightly better option I see in one retail giant is a game in a lock box attached by a cord to the display case. It does give the shopper a bit more flexibility to look at the game, turn the box over and read the description on the back and seem more information in general. Still the customer is forced to seek assistance from an employee if they want to make a purchase. The showcase itself is still locked. I would not mind this option so much if there was always someone standing nearby with a key. Unfortunately in the world of retail with tighter payroll budgets, that is not going to happen very often. Thus the advent of the wonderful thing we have come to know as a “call button”. Help is just a push away (and maybe several minutes away depending on how busy the associates are at the time).
     

Then there is the solution I have come to call the dump bin. There is nothing in place to prevent shoplifting in many cases. These tend to be bins filled with older games that may not be quite as popular so they are dumped in one of these containers. Customers have to dig and search to look at games. An avalanche may drop everything back on top of the item they had almost reached at the bottom of the mess. In some instances the games may protect games with an electronic article surveillance label which at least is some defense against theft. The problem is that the bad guys will remove the cellophane wrap and take the package and disc. These can then go to stores that buy “used” games for a few bucks each. There is always the internet option for selling or a trade for drugs on the street. Shoplifters are not necessarily picky about how they get money or drugs.
     

The preferred method in my mind to protect games is to use Sensormatic Safers. They look like a storage bag with a locking zipper and basically that is what they are. What is unique about these bags is that they are made of polyethylene and nylon material making them extremely durable. They also have electronic article surveillance built into them ensuring they will work with a Sensormatic security tower system. Why do I like this method of protecting merchandise? Accessibility for customers is the reason. Shoppers can pick up a game in a Safer, look at it from all angles and carry it around the store. They don’t have to wait for someone to help them open a display case just to look at an item they may or may not be interested in purchasing. The merchandise remains secure and the customer is more likely to buy it when they can carry it with them while conducting other shopping.
     

It is important to protect games and high shrink merchandise but it is just as important to ensure your customers have access to merchandise. The longer they have to wait for help or jump through hoops to make a purchase the less likely they will be to shop in your store in the future. Flexible Safers allow you to be flexible with your customers and that has a positive impact on sales and shortage.

 

It is important to protect games and we can help you with it.  Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.   

 

Sizing Up The Uses For Clothing Security Tags



Clothing security tags – 3                                                                                              WC Blog 838
Sensormatic Tags – 3

Sizing Up The Uses For Clothing Security Tags

     Why in the world would a non-clothing retailer ever want to use Sensormatic clothing security tags, it doesn’t make sense…or does it? What kind of stores can and should use these tags? On the surface it seems that only clothing retail stores should. But some stores that are not necessarily considered clothing stores sell articles of clothing. For example I have walked into car part stores and have noticed that they sell baseball caps. I have been in a college bookstore that sells more than books. They sell all types of apparel from athletic shorts to college logo button down style shirts. Clothing theft happens wherever garments are sold. 

     Perhaps you are of the mindset that none of this matters because your store only sells bedding and bathroom accessories. You never ever sell clothing of any sort. You might have a point except that shoplifters will steal bedding and bath merchandise just as quickly as they would steal a pair of shoes. The good news for you is that Sensormatic clothing security tags are versatile enough to be used on all sorts of products made of material. I worked as a Loss Prevention Officer for a big box retailer and we protected high dollar comforters with Sensormatic tags. I have also seen them used on more expensive brands of sheet sets and bath towels. 

     Then there are the stores that sell groceries. Ahhh, I know you think you are immune to clothing theft so you don’t need to worry about using Sensormatic tags on clothes. Now wait a minute before you stop reading. Let me ask you a question. Do you have a Sensormatic security system in place already? Are you using food-safe Sensormatic labels to protect meats? If you already have an electronic article surveillance system in place, why are you limiting what you are using it for? Why not carry some gift t-shirts or ballcaps to increase sales? Do you carry aprons for your customers? We live near a beach and a lot of grocery stores sell t-shirts with the area’s name on it for souvenirs. They also sell beach towels, baseball hats and visors to drive sales. You could do the same but you should also protect them with anti-theft tags.

     There is a well-known computer/electronics store I like to shop at. They carry computers, video gaming systems, stereo systems, smart phones, etc. Guess what else they sell? You got it they sell licensed clothing and backpacks. Now this particular store does have merchandise protection systems in place but I cannot tell you if they use Sensormatic tags on clothing or not. If they don’t they should. As with the grocery store, the system is in place why not maximize it to the fullest?

     Clothing security tags are not solely for clothing merchandise retailers. They have multiple uses on a wide range of products. I have used them on golfing gloves and baseball mitts. I have seen them used on curtains and sofa covers. I have also seen them pinned through blister packages in hardware departments. From drill bits to power screw drivers the tags are sturdy enough to pierce tough plastic deterring crooks from trying to shoplift even these items.

     If you have a Sensormatic security system but you are only tagging those products you believe your store specializes in like a grocery store tagging meats only you are missing the boat. There are labels and tags available for all kinds of things you may carry and have not thought about. If you don’t have an electronic article surveillance system you are missing out on an opportunity to decrease shortage and improve sales. Sensormatic systems are more affordable than you might realize. I recommend you get one installed now and learn how many items you really CAN protect in your store.
Need information on Sensormatic tags? Give us a call at 1.866.914.2567 now.


Why in the world would a non-clothing retailer ever want to use Sensormatic clothing security tags, it doesn’t make sense…or does it? What kind of stores can and should use these tags? On the surface it seems that only clothing retail stores should. But some stores that are not necessarily considered clothing stores sell articles of clothing. For example I have walked into car part stores and have noticed that they sell baseball caps. I have been in a college bookstore that sells more than books. They sell all types of apparel from athletic shorts to college logo button down style shirts. Clothing theft happens wherever garments are sold. 
     

Perhaps you are of the mindset that none of this matters because your store only sells bedding and bathroom accessories. You never ever sell clothing of any sort. You might have a point except that shoplifters will steal bedding and bath merchandise just as quickly as they would steal a pair of shoes. The good news for you is that Sensormatic clothing security tags are versatile enough to be used on all sorts of products made of material. I worked as a Loss Prevention Officer for a big box retailer and we protected high dollar comforters with Sensormatic tags. I have also seen them used on more expensive brands of sheet sets and bath towels. 
     

Then there are the stores that sell groceries. Ahhh, I know you think you are immune to clothing theft so you don’t need to worry about using Sensormatic tags on clothes. Now wait a minute before you stop reading. Let me ask you a question. Do you have a Sensormatic security system in place already? Are you using food-safe Sensormatic labels to protect meats? If you already have an electronic article surveillance system in place, why are you limiting what you are using it for? Why not carry some gift t-shirts or ballcaps to increase sales? Do you carry aprons for your customers? We live near a beach and a lot of grocery stores sell t-shirts with the area’s name on it for souvenirs. They also sell beach towels, baseball hats and visors to drive sales. You could do the same but you should also protect them with anti-theft tags.
     

There is a well-known computer/electronics store I like to shop at. They carry computers, video gaming systems, stereo systems, smart phones, etc. Guess what else they sell? You got it they sell licensed clothing and backpacks. Now this particular store does have merchandise protection systems in place but I cannot tell you if they use Sensormatic tags on clothing or not. If they don’t they should. As with the grocery store, the system is in place why not maximize it to the fullest?
     

Clothing security tags are not solely for clothing merchandise retailers. They have multiple uses on a wide range of products. I have used them on golfing gloves and baseball mitts. I have seen them used on curtains and sofa covers. I have also seen them pinned through blister packages in hardware departments. From drill bits to power screw drivers the tags are sturdy enough to pierce tough plastic deterring crooks from trying to shoplift even these items.
     

If you have a Sensormatic security system but you are only tagging those products you believe your store specializes in like a grocery store tagging meats only you are missing the boat. There are labels and tags available for all kinds of things you may carry and have not thought about. If you don’t have an electronic article surveillance system you are missing out on an opportunity to decrease shortage and improve sales. Sensormatic systems are more affordable than you might realize. I recommend you get one installed now and learn how many items you really CAN protect in your store.

 

Need information on Sensormatic tags? Give us a call at 1.866.914.2567 now.