electronic article surveillance

Are You Contributing To Dangerous Crimes When You Don’t Use Sensormatic Tags? Part 1


Sensormatic tags – 3                                                                                     WC Blog 769
Clothing Security – 3

Are You Contributing To Dangerous Crimes When You Don’t Use Sensormatic Tags? Part 1

     This may not seem fair to some of you but I am going on one of my rants about the need for retailers to use Sensormatic tags on clothes. The target of this tirade is aimed at least in part to the retail shop owners who refuse to use anti-theft devices on all of their clothing. I’m angry because I read another story about another moronic shoplifter who decided to steal and attempted to get away from police leading them on a high speed chase. The chases are bad enough but when these criminals then cause accidents, injuries to others or damage the property of others I get really angry. And if anyone out there wants to argue that police shouldn’t be engaging in pursuits your argument in falling on deaf ears. The idea that Law Enforcement should just disengage if a criminal decides to try to get away is ridiculous. Would you feel the same way if someone broke into your home, stole valuables and police officers saw the suspect’s vehicle but chose not to chase them because when they turned on their lights the crook sped up? You would be livid. I digress. In a report on wlbt.com, February 8, 2019 by Morgan Howard and David Kenney, “Richland police arrest woman suspected of shoplifting after high speed chase into Jackson” the story says a woman had been spotted stealing two televisions from Walmart. Police attempted to stop her and she led them on a high speed chase and she ended up going off the road, driving through a yard and “crashing just inches from a house.” “So what does this have to do with clothing security?” you ask, “these were televisions”. Well it turned out televisions were not the only thing this criminal had in her vehicle the police also recovered a pair of jeans.

     Would the use of Sensormatic tags have stopped this criminal suspect from stealing jeans and would that have had any bearing on the theft of televisions? I am going to say there is a strong likelihood that the incident would not have happened if Sensormatic tags had been used on all merchandise. I am specifically directing my remarks to the jeans because if they came from Walmart as did the televisions I know from my own shopping experience they do not tag their jeans. They DO use anti-theft devices on some televisions but I have personally prevented a shoplifting in one of their stores when a thief was going to try to roll out a television that did not have any protective device. From my years in Retail Loss Prevention I will say that in the vast majority of cases when my team or I caught shoplifters the merchandise had no clothing security tags or other type of security label. If someone did try to walk out with tagged product the electronic article surveillance alarm sounded and a supervisor or trained cashier responded and recovered the merchandise through a receipt check. When stores use tags and labels on all of their merchandise shoplifters shift their attention to stores that don’t use electronic article surveillance equipment.

     “Okay, so you showed me one case of a shoplifter fleeing and wrecking their car but no one was injured, what’s the big deal?” Glad I could ask for you. It isn’t an isolated case, I have had shoplifters run from me, jump into their car and slam it into reverse and back all the way out of the parking lot to avoid me seeing their license plate. I have seen shoplifters nearly run into other cars. But if my personal experiences are not evidence enough, let me give you one more news report from keyt.com, “Sheriff Deputy injured as shoplifter flees scene”, May 15, 2018 by Ryder Christ. The story relates that a shoplifter who was trying to flee from police jumped out of his moving car and the vehicle hit “a Sheriff’s deputy on a motorcycle.” The officer was injured due to the recklessness of the thief but fortunately was able to be treated at the scene of the incident. Shoplifters can be extremely dangerous. Whether it is intentional or through stupidity they often put others at risk.

     Store owners and managers, if you are not using clothing security and other anti-theft tools to stop this activity from taking place you are contributing to the problem. Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. can get you started in the right direction to put an end to this dangerous activity and make your store more profitable in the process. In Part 2 we will look at more dangerous shoplifting incidents and discuss what Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. can do to help you stop them from taking place in your buildings.
Get more information on Sensormatic Tags, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.

This may not seem fair to some of you but I am going on one of my rants about the need for retailers to use Sensormatic tags on clothes. The target of this tirade is aimed at least in part to the retail shop owners who refuse to use anti-theft devices on all of their clothing. I’m angry because I read another story about another moronic shoplifter who decided to steal and attempted to get away from police leading them on a high speed chase. The chases are bad enough but when these criminals then cause accidents, injuries to others or damage the property of others I get really angry. And if anyone out there wants to argue that police shouldn’t be engaging in pursuits your argument in falling on deaf ears. The idea that Law Enforcement should just disengage if a criminal decides to try to get away is ridiculous. Would you feel the same way if someone broke into your home, stole valuables and police officers saw the suspect’s vehicle but chose not to chase them because when they turned on their lights the crook sped up? You would be livid. I digress. In a report on wlbt.com, February 8, 2019 by Morgan Howard and David Kenney, “Richland police arrest woman suspected of shoplifting after high speed chase into Jackson” the story says a woman had been spotted stealing two televisions from Walmart. Police attempted to stop her and she led them on a high speed chase and she ended up going off the road, driving through a yard and “crashing just inches from a house.” “So what does this have to do with clothing security?” you ask, “these were televisions”. Well it turned out televisions were not the only thing this criminal had in her vehicle the police also recovered a pair of jeans.
     

Would the use of Sensormatic tags have stopped this criminal suspect from stealing jeans and would that have had any bearing on the theft of televisions? I am going to say there is a strong likelihood that the incident would not have happened if Sensormatic tags had been used on all merchandise. I am specifically directing my remarks to the jeans because if they came from Walmart as did the televisions I know from my own shopping experience they do not tag their jeans. They DO use anti-theft devices on some televisions but I have personally prevented a shoplifting in one of their stores when a thief was going to try to roll out a television that did not have any protective device. From my years in Retail Loss Prevention I will say that in the vast majority of cases when my team or I caught shoplifters the merchandise had no clothing security tags or other type of security label. If someone did try to walk out with tagged product the electronic article surveillance alarm sounded and a supervisor or trained cashier responded and recovered the merchandise through a receipt check. When stores use tags and labels on all of their merchandise shoplifters shift their attention to stores that don’t use electronic article surveillance equipment.
     

“Okay, so you showed me one case of a shoplifter fleeing and wrecking their car but no one was injured, what’s the big deal?” Glad I could ask for you. It isn’t an isolated case, I have had shoplifters run from me, jump into their car and slam it into reverse and back all the way out of the parking lot to avoid me seeing their license plate. I have seen shoplifters nearly run into other cars. But if my personal experiences are not evidence enough, let me give you one more news report from keyt.com, “Sheriff Deputy injured as shoplifter flees scene”, May 15, 2018 by Ryder Christ. The story relates that a shoplifter who was trying to flee from police jumped out of his moving car and the vehicle hit “a Sheriff’s deputy on a motorcycle.” The officer was injured due to the recklessness of the thief but fortunately was able to be treated at the scene of the incident. Shoplifters can be extremely dangerous. Whether it is intentional or through stupidity they often put others at risk.
     

Store owners and managers, if you are not using clothing security and other anti-theft tools to stop this activity from taking place you are contributing to the problem. Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. can get you started in the right direction to put an end to this dangerous activity and make your store more profitable in the process. In Part 2 we will look at more dangerous shoplifting incidents and discuss what Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. can do to help you stop them from taking place in your buildings.

 

Get more information on Sensormatic Tags, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.

 

How To Stop Shoplifting and Shortage – A Brief Conversation With Bill Bregar


Sensormatic tags – 3                                                                                                          WC blog 779
Stop shoplifting -3

How To Stop Shoplifting and Shortage – A Brief Conversation With Bill Bregar

     I recently had the pleasure of speaking with the founder of Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. and in the course of our discussion I was able to learn his philosophy on the use of Sensormatic tags in a store. I have written on my own opinions based on my years of Loss Prevention and retail management experience but getting Bill Bregar’s opinion was interesting. He and I have similar experiences from the military and Loss Prevention but while I moved no higher than a store level Loss Prevention Manager, Bill was at the upper echelons of retail as a National Director for Loss Prevention Departments for major retail chains. He has also been consulting with retail owners for many years helping them improve their financial numbers through theft and shortage reduction. His solution to shortage reduction is a balanced approach: stop shoplifting with Sensormatic systems, train managers and their teams on how to identify and stop theft safely and effectively and the use of background checks and drug screenings.

     So what might a balanced approach to shortage reduction look like for you, the store owner?
First a shortage prevention strategy should include an electronic article surveillance system and Sensormatic tags. As I spoke with Bill I was impressed that he doesn’t approach this aspect of a strategy with a “tag everything in the store focus”. Bill helps his clients focus on what is going to give the most bang for the buck. While I have always thought that as much as possible should be tagged, his approach in many cases is to focus on the 20% of the merchandise that causes 80% of the losses. What I really appreciated and I am certain Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. customers appreciate is that there is not a push to sell customers more tags than they need. If a business can grow or the need arises more tags can always be purchased.
Some may argue that theft prevention begins at the personnel level. The employees a store manager hires can create more theft problems than a shoplifter for a store. They have full access to the store and can steal in many different ways. To prevent this from happening, a store should be conducting pre-employment screenings. Mr. Bregar told me that there are companies out there that will promise they will do nationwide background checks but as a former law enforcement officer he is aware that these are fake promises. Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. puts the time and effort into the background checks they conduct. These checks may be criminal histories based on state searches or county searches. The check may include sex offender registries, education checks, driving records and more. When a store owner has Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. conduct their background checks they are assured there won’t be any shortcuts taken in the research of their applicant’s history.
In the same vein as background checks, pre-employment drug screening is an important part of Bill’s theft prevention strategy. Workers with drug addictions may resort to theft to support a habit. These employees will also help friends steal by alerting them to opportunities they may see by texting or calling. The employee may also help assist in shoplifting by passing merchandise through a register without ringing it up for friends in exchange for drugs. Employers can stop shoplifting aided by employees and employee theft by weeding out problems before they happen. Drug screening is a useful tool in Bill’s shortage prevention toolbox.
One more important piece in the shortage prevention strategy for a store is training. Whether it is training on tag placement, responding to an electronic article surveillance alarm or how to stop shoplifting, Bill knows how critical training is to any theft prevention program.
The biggest take-away I had following my conversation with Mr. Bregar is his focus on the importance of service and integrity in serving Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. clients.

     Sensormatic tags and systems are a key component of any Loss Prevention program and Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. can help get a store set up with what that particular store needs. An effective program is going to be one that incorporates multiple factors that impact theft and shortage. After my conversation with Bill Bregar I am more convinced than ever that Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. is your best resource for helping you reduce shrink and grow your profits.
Get more information on Sensormatic tags, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today. 

I recently had the pleasure of speaking with the founder of Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. and in the course of our discussion I was able to learn his philosophy on the use of Sensormatic tags in a store. I have written on my own opinions based on my years of Loss Prevention and retail management experience but getting Bill Bregar’s opinion was interesting. He and I have similar experiences from the military and Loss Prevention but while I moved no higher than a store level Loss Prevention Manager, Bill was at the upper echelons of retail as a National Director for Loss Prevention Departments for major retail chains. He has also been consulting with retail owners for many years helping them improve their financial numbers through theft and shortage reduction. His solution to shortage reduction is a balanced approach: stop shoplifting with Sensormatic systems, train managers and their teams on how to identify and stop theft safely and effectively and the use of background checks and drug screenings.
     

So what might a balanced approach to shortage reduction look like for you, the store owner?

First a shortage prevention strategy should include an electronic article surveillance system and Sensormatic tags. As I spoke with Bill I was impressed that he doesn’t approach this aspect of a strategy with a “tag everything in the store focus”. Bill helps his clients focus on what is going to give the most bang for the buck. While I have always thought that as much as possible should be tagged, his approach in many cases is to focus on the 20% of the merchandise that causes 80% of the losses. What I really appreciated and I am certain Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. customers appreciate is that there is not a push to sell customers more tags than they need. If a business can grow or the need arises more tags can always be purchased.

Some may argue that theft prevention begins at the personnel level. The employees a store manager hires can create more theft problems than a shoplifter for a store. They have full access to the store and can steal in many different ways. To prevent this from happening, a store should be conducting pre-employment screenings. Mr. Bregar told me that there are companies out there that will promise they will do nationwide background checks but as a former law enforcement officer he is aware that these are fake promises. Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. puts the time and effort into the background checks they conduct. These checks may be criminal histories based on state searches or county searches. The check may include sex offender registries, education checks, driving records and more. When a store owner has Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. conduct their background checks they are assured there won’t be any shortcuts taken in the research of their applicant’s history.

In the same vein as background checks, pre-employment drug screening is an important part of Bill’s theft prevention strategy. Workers with drug addictions may resort to theft to support a habit. These employees will also help friends steal by alerting them to opportunities they may see by texting or calling. The employee may also help assist in shoplifting by passing merchandise through a register without ringing it up for friends in exchange for drugs. Employers can stop shoplifting aided by employees and employee theft by weeding out problems before they happen. Drug screening is a useful tool in Bill’s shortage prevention toolbox.

One more important piece in the shortage prevention strategy for a store is training. Whether it is training on tag placement, responding to an electronic article surveillance alarm or how to stop shoplifting, Bill knows how critical training is to any theft prevention program.

The biggest take-away I had following my conversation with Mr. Bregar is his focus on the importance of service and integrity in serving Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. clients.
     

Sensormatic tags and systems are a key component of any Loss Prevention program and Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. can help get a store set up with what that particular store needs. An effective program is going to be one that incorporates multiple factors that impact theft and shortage. After my conversation with Bill Bregar I am more convinced than ever that Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. is your best resource for helping you reduce shrink and grow your profits.

 

Get more information on Sensormatic tags, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today. 

 

Advantages Of Using Sensormatic Security Labels Over Other Brands Part 2



Sensormatic Security Labels –   5                                                                               WC Blog 756
Electronic Article Surveillance – 3


Advantages Of Using Sensormatic Security Labels Over Other Brands Part 2

     In Part 1 of this series on Sensormatic security labels I discussed some problems that can be encountered with certain electronic article surveillance systems and labels. From phantom alarms at the doors to having to try to work with large labels there are can be disadvantages associated with some systems. On the other hand there are clear advantages to using Sensormatic security systems. After nearly 17 in Retail Loss Prevention I have had personal experience using different labels, tags and towers. I saw how effective the Sensormatic labels were in protecting merchandise.

     This is a short list of what makes the Sensormatic security labels my preferred choice in anti-theft soft tags:
Right out of the gate is the size of the Sensormatic labels. Whether we are talking about the Sensormatic AP Sheet Labels or the HBC Labels, these tags have a small footprint and take up little space on a piece of merchandise. This means that there are more small items that can be tagged than might have been possible with traditional radio frequency (RF) labels.
Where RF electronic article surveillance labels are limited in the numbers of products they can be used on, the acoustic magnetic (AM) labels are virtually unlimited. AM labels are not affected by foils or metals so products such as foil gift wraps, foil gift bags, and even bicycles can be protected with a label.
Because AM labels are not affected by metal, metal shopping carts are not problems for tagged merchandise. Metal shopping carts by their design can interfere with radio waves and disrupt the frequency of RF labels. AM labels are not impacted by this so retailers need not be concerned about what materials their buggies are made out of. Professional shoplifters occasionally use foil lined bags called booster bags to shoplift. These bags are intended to render RF labels useless so they won’t be detected as merchandise in a foil lined bag is carried out of a store. Again, AM labels are not affected by these bags and can still be detected by alarm pedestals.
AM labels can withstand high humidity levels for certain periods of time without the effectiveness of the tag being impacted. They can also be stored for up to 96 hours in temperatures not exceeding 122 degrees Fahrenheit. This may not seem like a big deal at first but if labels are transported in delivery trucks temperatures and humidity can get high. Having labels that can stand up to these conditions and not lose their potency is an important feature that should not be underestimated by a retailer.
Finally, and this is probably one of the most important differences in my opinion, Sensormatic’s labels can be reactivated with the Sensormatic Hand Wand. 
Each of these are great reasons for investing in Sensormatic security labels but I really want to focus on the last point about reactivation.

     When merchandise with an RF label is detuned at the point of sale that label is neutralized and can’t be used again. That is okay if all of your sales are final but we all know that merchandise returns are going to happen. So what happens when the merchandise is brought back and the packaging has an RF label still attached? Based on my experiences I will tell you that in the majority of cases nothing will happen. A new tag cannot be placed on top of an old tag and to be frank most retailers won’t even think about trying to place a new tag on a returned product. That means if the merchandise is in re-sellable condition it is going back out unprotected. It may look like it is tagged but it won’t work if someone decides to try to steal it. With the ability to reactivate Sensormatic security labels a retailer only needs to the Sensormatic Hand Wand available at the return desk to ensure product is secure and ready to be re-stocked.

    As I have explained there are sound reasons for choosing to use Sensormatic security labels over other brands. They are proven to stop shoplifting and can be used in situations that would negate the effectiveness of other tags. Don’t take chances on electronic article surveillance labels that may deteriorate due to climate conditions or may not be active any longer. You can count on Sensormatic labels to help in keeping shortage low.
Need information on Sensormatic security labels? Give us a call at 1.866.914.2567 now. 

In Part 1 of this series on Sensormatic security labels I discussed some problems that can be encountered with certain electronic article surveillance systems and labels. From phantom alarms at the doors to having to try to work with large labels there are can be disadvantages associated with some systems. On the other hand there are clear advantages to using Sensormatic security systems. After nearly 17 in Retail Loss Prevention I have had personal experience using different labels, tags and towers. I saw how effective the Sensormatic labels were in protecting merchandise.
     

This is a short list of what makes the Sensormatic security labels my preferred choice in anti-theft soft tags:

Right out of the gate is the size of the Sensormatic labels. Whether we are talking about the Sensormatic AP Sheet Labels or the HBC Labels, these tags have a small footprint and take up little space on a piece of merchandise. This means that there are more small items that can be tagged than might have been possible with traditional radio frequency (RF) labels.

Where RF electronic article surveillance labels are limited in the numbers of products they can be used on, the acoustic magnetic (AM) labels are virtually unlimited. AM labels are not affected by foils or metals so products such as foil gift wraps, foil gift bags, and even bicycles can be protected with a label.

Because AM labels are not affected by metal, metal shopping carts are not problems for tagged merchandise. Metal shopping carts by their design can interfere with radio waves and disrupt the frequency of RF labels. AM labels are not impacted by this so retailers need not be concerned about what materials their buggies are made out of. Professional shoplifters occasionally use foil lined bags called booster bags to shoplift. These bags are intended to render RF labels useless so they won’t be detected as merchandise in a foil lined bag is carried out of a store. Again, AM labels are not affected by these bags and can still be detected by alarm pedestals.

AM labels can withstand high humidity levels for certain periods of time without the effectiveness of the tag being impacted. They can also be stored for up to 96 hours in temperatures not exceeding 122 degrees Fahrenheit. This may not seem like a big deal at first but if labels are transported in delivery trucks temperatures and humidity can get high. Having labels that can stand up to these conditions and not lose their potency is an important feature that should not be underestimated by a retailer.

Finally, and this is probably one of the most important differences in my opinion, Sensormatic’s labels can be reactivated with the Sensormatic Hand Wand. 

Each of these are great reasons for investing in Sensormatic security labels but I really want to focus on the last point about reactivation.
     

When merchandise with an RF label is detuned at the point of sale that label is neutralized and can’t be used again. That is okay if all of your sales are final but we all know that merchandise returns are going to happen. So what happens when the merchandise is brought back and the packaging has an RF label still attached? Based on my experiences I will tell you that in the majority of cases nothing will happen. A new tag cannot be placed on top of an old tag and to be frank most retailers won’t even think about trying to place a new tag on a returned product. That means if the merchandise is in re-sellable condition it is going back out unprotected. It may look like it is tagged but it won’t work if someone decides to try to steal it. With the ability to reactivate Sensormatic security labels a retailer only needs to the Sensormatic Hand Wand available at the return desk to ensure product is secure and ready to be re-stocked.
   

As I have explained there are sound reasons for choosing to use Sensormatic security labels over other brands. They are proven to stop shoplifting and can be used in situations that would negate the effectiveness of other tags. Don’t take chances on electronic article surveillance labels that may deteriorate due to climate conditions or may not be active any longer. You can count on Sensormatic labels to help in keeping shortage low.

 

Need information on Sensormatic security labels? Give us a call at 1.866.914.2567 now.