Preventing Theft With Checkpoint Systems Part 3

Checkpoint Tags-4                                                                                                                            WC blog 100
Checkpoint Systems-4
Preventing Theft With Checkpoint Systems Part 3
     In this series of articles I have been discussing Checkpoint systems and how they work to prevent theft.  I covered electronic article surveillance (EAS) antennas, how they work and the impact on retail theft prevention.  In the second part I reviewed Checkpoint tags, choices offered and how they deter theft.  In this final installment I will be covering Checkpoint deactivation units, detection devices and the importance of ensuring proper operation to maximize the effectiveness of Checkpoint systems.
     When EAS alarm antennas regularly sound due to Checkpoint tags not being deactivated or removed from merchandise after purchase, customers become annoyed and shoplifters become unafraid.  Checkpoint deactivation pads integrate with most point of sale registers and it is at that point they “turn off” or detune EAS soft tags and labels.  As a tag is passed over the pad it is desensitized and the cashier does not have to spend extra effort attempting to locate the tag.  Hard tags are designed to not deactivate when passed over a pad, they are simply removed using a detachment tool secured at the register.  Once removed the tags are collected and placed in a central location until more merchandise is received and ready to be tagged.  
     It is important to test your Checkpoint systems equipment daily.  Deactivation pads can be tested with the DV1000 deactivation verifier.  By holding the verifier near a deactivation pad and pressing a button you can quickly determine if your equipment is working.  When a deactivation pad is not working, soft tags and labels are not “turned off”, and this causes a false alarm.  False alarms, in turn, embarrass and even anger customers and if not handled properly, can lead to patron’s not returning and lost sales.  I should note that failure to remove hard tags can also lead to false alarms, causing the same problems.  Worse than this is the situation where a store fails to correct a problem and employees stop responding to alarm events.  Shoplifters take notice of employees that simply wave to shoppers who set off an alarm or even ignore them.  Complacency leads to increased theft and defeats the purpose of having an EAS system. 
 Checkpoint also offers an Omni Verifier/Deactivator that can verify if a deactivator is working.  Additionally, there are situations in which a customer can bring merchandise into the store that has Checkpoint tags that were not deactivated from another retailer, setting off your antennas.  The Omni verifier can help locate a hidden EAS tag somewhere in clothing or a bag and you can make the customer aware of the issue.  If you can validate the item was purchased, you may opt to offer to deactivate the item as a customer courtesy (your customer will love you for it, trust me).  
   EAS test cards can also be supplied by Checkpoint to test your antennas. These are cards that have non-deactivating Checkpoint tags in them that are walked through EAS antennas daily to ensure the system is responding properly.  It is possible for the antennas to stop working, possibly due to a power outage, a circuit breaker being tripped or just a faulty circuit.  Identifying a non-working antenna system as soon as possible is crucial for getting a service call in and a technician to the store to get the system operational again.  Needless to say, but the longer a unit is out of service the greater the opportunity for shoplifters to take advantage of the issue.
     With proper, daily testing of your Checkpoint system you can ensure your customers have a distraction free shopping experience.   Training employees how to test deactivation units and antennas, remove hard tags and respond to EAS alarms will decrease the theft in your store and enhance profits. 
For more information on Checkpoint systems, contact us or call 1.770.426.0547 
     

In this series of articles I have been discussing Checkpoint systems and how they work to prevent theft. I covered electronic article surveillance (EAS) antennas, how they work and the impact on retail theft prevention.  In the second part I reviewed Checkpoint tags, choices offered and how they deter theft. In this final installment I will be covering Checkpoint deactivation units, detection devices and the importance of ensuring proper operation to maximize the effectiveness of Checkpoint systems.
     

When EAS alarm antennas regularly sound due to Checkpoint tags not being deactivated or removed from merchandise after purchase, customers become annoyed and shoplifters become unafraid. Checkpoint deactivation pads integrate with most point of sale registers and it is at that point they “turn off” or detune EAS soft tags and labels. As a tag is passed over the pad it is desensitized and the cashier does not have to spend extra effort attempting to locate the tag. Hard tags are designed to not deactivate when passed over a pad, they are simply removed using a detachment tool secured at the register. Once removed the tags are collected and placed in a central location until more merchandise is received and ready to be tagged.  
     

It is important to test your Checkpoint systems equipment daily. Deactivation pads can be tested with the DV1000 deactivation verifier. By holding the verifier near a deactivation pad and pressing a button you can quickly determine if your equipment is working. When a deactivation pad is not working, soft tags and labels are not “turned off”, and this causes a false alarm. False alarms, in turn, embarrass and even anger customers and if not handled properly, can lead to patron’s not returning and lost sales. I should note that failure to remove hard tags can also lead to false alarms, causing the same problems. Worse than this is the situation where a store fails to correct a problem and employees stop responding to alarm events. Shoplifters take notice of employees that simply wave to shoppers who set off an alarm or even ignore them. Complacency leads to increased theft and defeats the purpose of having an EAS system. 
 

Checkpoint also offers an Omni Verifier/Deactivator that can verify if a deactivator is working Additionally, there are situations in which a customer can bring merchandise into the store that has Checkpoint tags that were not deactivated from another retailer, setting off your antennas. The Omni verifier can help locate a hidden EAS tag somewhere in clothing or a bag and you can make the customer aware of the issue. If you can validate the item was purchased, you may opt to offer to deactivate the item as a customer courtesy (your customer will love you for it, trust me). 

 

EAS test cards can also be supplied by Checkpoint to test your antennas. These are cards that have non-deactivating Checkpoint tags in them that are walked through EAS antennas daily to ensure the system is responding properly. It is possible for the antennas to stop working, possibly due to a power outage, a circuit breaker being tripped or just a faulty circuit. Identifying a non-working antenna system as soon as possible is crucial for getting a service call in and a technician to the store to get the system operational again. Needless to say, but the longer a unit is out of service the greater the opportunity for shoplifters to take advantage of the issue.

     

With proper, daily testing of your Checkpoint system you can ensure your customers have a distraction free shopping experience. Training employees how to test deactivation units and antennas, remove hard tags and respond to EAS alarms will decrease the theft in your store and enhance profits. 

 

For more information on Checkpoint systems, contact us or call 1.770.426.0547 

     

 

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