Checkpoint Systems Help Recover Stolen Merchandise – But For A Day, Not The Way You Might Think

Checkpoint Systems-5                                                                                                                    WC Blog 156
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Checkpoint Systems Help Recover Stolen Merchandise – But For A Day, Not The Way You Might Think
     Checkpoint systems have the tools to stop shoplifting.  From electronic article surveillance antennas to deactivation units, hand verifiers and Checkpoint tags, I have had the pleasure of using all types of Checkpoint equipment.  On one occasion I even used a piece of equipment to stop shoplifting but I don’t think it was the way anyone at Checkpoint systems had intended the device to work.  The item I am speaking of is a DV1000 deactivation verifier.
     The deactivation verifier is a small, gray box with a button on top that is pressed to determine if an EAS deactivation pad is working.  When held over a functioning pad, and the button is pushed a small light on the front of the unit turns green.   When pushed any other time the light turns red.  The verifier is simple to use but extremely helpful in troubleshooting equipment to ensure it is operating correctly.
     One day I was working and observed a young boy enter our store by himself.  I recognized him as a regular in our store who was usually accompanied by friends.  I had suspected the youngster of shoplifting for some time but our Loss Prevention Team could not catch him. This particular day I observed him when he entered and so I was able to keep surveillance on him his entire time in the store.   I watched the boy as he walked around looking at merchandise and picking things up and putting them back down.  The youngster eventually picked up a handful of collector cards/ball cards and continued through the store, opening the cards and selecting the ones he wanted.  After several trips back to the cards, he was done with his “shopping” spree and headed for the exit.  
     I followed the young man when he walked out the store, stopped him and brought him back in.  The cards that had been chosen had Checkpoint tags source tagged in the packages but our Checkpoint Systems antennas did not sound because the packages and some of the cards had been discarded in the store.  I took the culprit to the security office and told him to return the cards to me.  He told me he did not have any cards.  I made every effort to get him to admit to the theft and give me the merchandise back but he was tough and wouldn’t crack.  
     At this point I decided it was time to pull out all of the stops.  I reached in my desk drawer and pulled out my lie detector, which happened to also look suspiciously like a Checkpoint DV 1000 deactivation verifier.  I told the young man that the item I was holding was a lie detector and if he told me a lie the light would turn red.  My would-be criminal’s mouth dropped open and the look on his face was priceless.  I asked him if he had any stolen cards in his pocket.  He told me he did not and I held down the button on the verifier.  The light turned red and I told the boy that the lie detector proved he was lying.  At that the boy sheepishly pulled the cards from his pocket and gave them to me.  He also admitted to his prior thefts, confirming what I had suspected.  I contacted the boy’s mother who picked him up and took him up.  
             
     Checkpoint systems are designed to stop shoplifting starting with the deterrence value of the antennas at the front doors to the Checkpoint tags and labels placed on merchandise.  Contact Checkpoint and find out how they can help you prevent theft, but don’t bother asking about their DV 1000 “lie detectors”, they probably won’t know what you are talking about.
Get more information on Checkpoint Systems, contact us or call 1.770.426.0547 today. 

Checkpoint systems have the tools to stop shoplifting. From electronic article surveillance antennas to deactivation units, hand verifiers and Checkpoint tags, I have had the pleasure of using all types of Checkpoint equipment. On one occasion I even used a piece of equipment to stop shoplifting but I don’t think it was the way anyone at Checkpoint systems had intended the device to work. The item I am speaking of is a DV1000 deactivation verifier.
     

The deactivation verifier is a small, gray box with a button on top that is pressed to determine if an EAS deactivation pad is working. When held over a functioning pad, and the button is pushed a small light on the front of the unit turns green. When pushed any other time the light turns red. The verifier is simple to use but extremely helpful in troubleshooting equipment to ensure it is operating correctly.
     

One day I was working and observed a young boy enter our store by himself.  I recognized him as a regular in our store who was usually accompanied by friends. I had suspected the youngster of shoplifting for some time but our Loss Prevention Team could not catch him. This particular day I observed him when he entered and so I was able to keep surveillance on him his entire time in the store.  I watched the boy as he walked around looking at merchandise and picking things up and putting them back down. The youngster eventually picked up a handful of collector cards/ball cards and continued through the store, opening the cards and selecting the ones he wanted. After several trips back to the cards, he was done with his “shopping” spree and headed for the exit.  
     

I followed the young man when he walked out the store, stopped him and brought him back in. The cards that had been chosen had Checkpoint tags source tagged in the packages but our Checkpoint Systems antennas did not sound because the packages and some of the cards had been discarded in the store. I took the culprit to the security office and told him to return the cards to me. He told me he did not have any cards. I made every effort to get him to admit to the theft and give me the merchandise back but he was tough and wouldn’t crack.  
     

At this point I decided it was time to pull out all of the stops. I reached in my desk drawer and pulled out my lie detector, which happened to also look suspiciously like a Checkpoint DV 1000 deactivation verifier. I told the young man that the item I was holding was a lie detector and if he told me a lie the light would turn red. My would-be criminal’s mouth dropped open and the look on his face was priceless. I asked him if he had any stolen cards in his pocket. He told me he did not and I held down the button on the verifier.  The light turned red and I told the boy that the lie detector proved he was lying. At that the boy sheepishly pulled the cards from his pocket and gave them to me. He also admitted to his prior thefts, confirming what I had suspected. I contacted the boy’s mother who picked him up and took him up.  
                  

Checkpoint systems are designed to stop shoplifting starting with the deterrence value of the antennas at the front doors to the Checkpoint tags and labels placed on merchandise. Contact us and find out how we can help you prevent theft.

 

Get more information on Checkpoint Systems, contact us or call 1.770.426.0547 today. 

 

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