A Much Larger Issue At Hand- Retail Customer Traffic Counters

A men’s clothing store was recently hit by a group of very nonchalant thieves. The group came into the store one by one, and scattered to each of the sides of the store. Each shoplifter had a bag with them and started to stuff the bags full of merchandise. Slowly each shoplifter made their way to the exit doors. As they left, the Checkpoint System alarmed notifying store management to their thievery.
As the shoplifters sped off, a few of them dropped their bags, and the store was able to recover some of the merchandise- and gain some insight into how much merchandise had been taken. After reviewing CCTV footage from their Checkpoint System video, they determined that these suspects actually had been in recently to scope out the store. Since they did not take anything then, the Checkpoint System did not alert store management as to what was going on.
What if there was a device that could help identify a large theft ring before the actual theft took place?
Retail customer traffic counters can potentially do just that. Because the purpose of VisiPlus, or any other brand of retail customer traffic counters, is to track the number of customers coming into a store during a specified hour of the day, any large influxes should be readily noticed.
When the VisiPlus reports started to show increases in traffic during a few hours of the day, but no sales to correspond, it would be prudent to investigate. Why were so many people coming in and out (several times in this particular instance) but there were no sales? Was there a problem with customer service, or with merchandise availability? If not, then maybe this is an indicator of a larger issue of organized theft.
VisiPlus reports to a store data garnered from its retail customer traffic counters. If the store analyzes this data in a timely fashion, there is no telling what issues they can catch before they become a problem.

A men’s clothing store was recently hit by a group of very nonchalant thieves. The group came into the store one by one, and scattered to each of the sides of the store. Each shoplifter had a bag with them and started to stuff the bags full of merchandise. Slowly each shoplifter made their way to the exit doors. As they left, the Checkpoint System alarmed notifying store management to their thievery.

As the shoplifters sped off, a few of them dropped their bags, and the store was able to recover some of the merchandise- and gain some insight into how much merchandise had been taken. After reviewing CCTV footage from their Checkpoint System video, they determined that these suspects actually had been in recently to scope out the store. Since they did not take anything then, the Checkpoint System did not alert store management as to what was going on.

What if there was a device that could help identify a large theft ring before the actual theft took place?

Retail customer traffic counters can potentially do just that. Because the purpose of VisiPlus, or any other brand of retail customer traffic counters, is to track the number of customers coming into a store during a specified hour of the day, any large influxes should be readily noticed.

When the VisiPlus reports started to show increases in traffic during a few hours of the day, but no sales to correspond, it would be prudent to investigate. Why were so many people coming in and out (several times in this particular instance) but there were no sales? Was there a problem with customer service, or with merchandise availability? If not, then maybe this is an indicator of a larger issue of organized theft.

VisiPlus reports to a store data garnered from its retail customer traffic counters. If the store analyzes this data in a timely fashion, there is no telling what issues they can catch before they become a problem.

 

You may also like

Leave a comment