Clothing Security

Prevent Fitting Room Failures With Sensormatic Tags



Sensormatic Tags – 3                                                                                                     WC Blog 805
Clothing Security -3


Prevent Fitting Room Failures With Sensormatic Tags

     If you sell clothing you have fitting rooms and if you have fitting rooms it can be tough to prevent theft especially if your store does not use Sensormatic tags on clothing. As is often the case this thought came to me as I was on a shopping excursion. This time I was with one of my sons who was purchasing clothes for a job interview. It just so happened that he wanted my assistance in selecting appropriate attire (yeah, dad can still be useful from time to time especially when mom isn’t home). We went to a department store and looked at suits, shirts, sports jackets and ties. The funny thing is I had worked for this particular business, though not this store, when I started out in my Loss Prevention career. I know the protection we used to use for merchandise including fitting room controls. As we looked at the apparel I was somewhat taken aback at the lack of clothing security tags on merchandise. $35.00 slacks on the low end, suits in the hundreds of dollars, even the sports coat he settled on was on sale from $110.00 to $85.00. Hmmm…I was surprised but times change and I could not see any use of anti-theft devices. We selected several pair of pants, and the sports coat and he went to the fitting room. No one was present to check what he was carrying into the rooms. I found another item I wanted him to try on and took it to him and to be honest I was shocked at the condition of the fitting room stalls. All were empty of people but there were empty hangers, and loose clothing in every one of them. I even saw a large plastic shopping bag from another store in one room. I could not help but wonder how much theft had taken place and when the last fitting room inspection had taken place. 

     Fitting rooms are notorious for being a favorite location for shoplifters. Due to payroll constraints many stores have stopped assigning workers as fitting room attendants. Other stores have opted for a hybrid whereby the sales associate assigned to a department also controls fitting rooms. This may be done by keeping fitting room doors locked or by placing a point of sale near the fitting room entrance. There are drawbacks to each of these strategies. Locking doors requires a sales associate to be available with a key when a customer wants to try something on. Delay that shopper and you anger them and potentially lose sales. Putting a cashier near a fitting room entrance may give the appearance of control but if that cashier is busy they won’t be able to control activity in or out of a fitting room. Using Sensormatic tags is the only sensible solution to preventing theft of clothing in a fitting room.
 
     Hopefully every store owner and manager takes clothing security as seriously as I do. I understand that stores and especially small stores have limited budgets. It is rarely practical for these stores to staff a fitting room especially when some major retailers have had to move away from that model. Sensormatic tags can take care of many of the problems posed by fitting room theft. Thieves want rewards with minimal risk. Tags present risk because they will set off the towers at the front doors. When shoplifters attempt to force tags off of garments it damages the merchandise rendering them useless to the would-be crook. Stores may not be able to put an employee at the fitting room but they can afford to purchase a Loss Prevention System that can be almost as effective. One reminder though, even if you opt to buy a Sensormatic system and tags you can’t totally neglect your fitting rooms. Regular inspections for empty hangers, old clothing and re-shop merchandise must be made. Cluttered fitting rooms tend to attract criminals. 

     Clothing security can be difficult when it comes to fitting rooms. Patrons want to try on clothes but unfettered access to fitting rooms can lead to financial loss for store owners. Protect your merchandise with Sensormatic anti-theft systems and let your customers enjoy trying on merchandise while you relax in the knowledge your inventory is safe and secure.

Get more information on Sensormatic tags, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.

If you sell clothing you have fitting rooms and if you have fitting rooms it can be tough to prevent theft especially if your store does not use Sensormatic tags on clothing. As is often the case this thought came to me as I was on a shopping excursion. This time I was with one of my sons who was purchasing clothes for a job interview. It just so happened that he wanted my assistance in selecting appropriate attire (yeah, dad can still be useful from time to time especially when mom isn’t home). We went to a department store and looked at suits, shirts, sports jackets and ties. The funny thing is I had worked for this particular business, though not this store, when I started out in my Loss Prevention career. I know the protection we used to use for merchandise including fitting room controls. As we looked at the apparel I was somewhat taken aback at the lack of clothing security tags on merchandise. $35.00 slacks on the low end, suits in the hundreds of dollars, even the sports coat he settled on was on sale from $110.00 to $85.00. Hmmm…I was surprised but times change and I could not see any use of anti-theft devices. We selected several pair of pants, and the sports coat and he went to the fitting room. No one was present to check what he was carrying into the rooms. I found another item I wanted him to try on and took it to him and to be honest I was shocked at the condition of the fitting room stalls. All were empty of people but there were empty hangers, and loose clothing in every one of them. I even saw a large plastic shopping bag from another store in one room. I could not help but wonder how much theft had taken place and when the last fitting room inspection had taken place. 
     

Fitting rooms are notorious for being a favorite location for shoplifters. Due to payroll constraints many stores have stopped assigning workers as fitting room attendants. Other stores have opted for a hybrid whereby the sales associate assigned to a department also controls fitting rooms. This may be done by keeping fitting room doors locked or by placing a point of sale near the fitting room entrance. There are drawbacks to each of these strategies. Locking doors requires a sales associate to be available with a key when a customer wants to try something on. Delay that shopper and you anger them and potentially lose sales. Putting a cashier near a fitting room entrance may give the appearance of control but if that cashier is busy they won’t be able to control activity in or out of a fitting room. Using Sensormatic tags is the only sensible solution to preventing theft of clothing in a fitting room.      

 

Hopefully every store owner and manager takes clothing security as seriously as I do. I understand that stores and especially small stores have limited budgets. It is rarely practical for these stores to staff a fitting room especially when some major retailers have had to move away from that model. Sensormatic tags can take care of many of the problems posed by fitting room theft. Thieves want rewards with minimal risk. Tags present risk because they will set off the towers at the front doors. When shoplifters attempt to force tags off of garments it damages the merchandise rendering them useless to the would-be crook. Stores may not be able to put an employee at the fitting room but they can afford to purchase a Loss Prevention System that can be almost as effective. One reminder though, even if you opt to buy a Sensormatic system and tags you can’t totally neglect your fitting rooms. Regular inspections for empty hangers, old clothing and re-shop merchandise must be made. Cluttered fitting rooms tend to attract criminals. 
     

 Clothing security can be difficult when it comes to fitting rooms. Patrons want to try on clothes but unfettered access to fitting rooms can lead to financial loss for store owners. Protect your merchandise with Sensormatic anti-theft systems and let your customers enjoy trying on merchandise while you relax in the knowledge your inventory is safe and secure.

 

Get more information on Sensormatic tags, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.

 

Ad”dressing” The Problem Of Clothing Theft With Sensormatic Tags



Clothing security tags-4                                                                                                         WC Blog 798
Sensormatic tags – 4

Ad”dressing” The Problem Of Clothing Theft With Sensormatic Tags

     I don’t want to appear to be dressing you down but if you aren’t using clothing security tags on your merchandise I feel compelled to ask why not? Is it the idea that an anti-theft system would cost too much? Do you believe it is going to cost you the shirt on your back? You might change your mind when you learn about a story I just read from fox43.com, March 23, 2019, “Police recover $100K in stolen merchandise, $40k hidden behind baby crib” by CNN Wire. What was so special about this story? For one thing according to the report, “…over 400 pair of sunglasses stored in display and individual cases valued at approximately $37,000” were recovered. This was on top of clothing police found amounting to, “…over $100,000 worth of stolen merchandise from Lulumon, Victoria Secret, Zumiez, Abercrombie and Fitch, Ralph Lauren – Polo, Hollister, The Disney Store, Tommy Hilfiger, Calvin Klein, Ugg, Nike, Adidas, Champion and Sun Glass Hut.” Those numbers are distressing to someone like me who has been involved in Retail Loss Prevention. I am concerned for the victims of this particular activity but I am even more concerned for the small and medium store owners. The national chains have resources they can rely on to address theft and some use Sensormatic tags on clothing and clothing accessories such as sunglasses.

     It may have crossed your mind that many of these national chain stores are already using clothing security tags of one type or another. This can prompt the question, “What is the point of using tags at all?” There are a couple of answers to the question. First, in many of these chains not everything in the store is protected with clothing security tags. These businesses focus tagging programs on high theft or their highest price point merchandise. That means shoplifters can still steal the other untagged merchandise and get away with it. I would also suggest that the quality of training received by store associates in responding to alarms caused by Sensormatic tags is probably minimal if any training has taken place. I would go so far as to say there is a good chance that anti-theft equipment is not tested on a daily or even a weekly basis. Faulty equipment can lead to increased theft and professional shoplifters know how to watch to see if alarms are being set off. National chain stores do not necessarily have in-house Loss Prevention Officers so there is no one regularly auditing tagging programs. A District Loss Prevention Manager may conduct periodic audits but again without regular oversight a tagging program often falls to the bottom of store priority lists.

     For small or independent store owners the use of Sensormatic tags and equipment can have a big impact on theft reduction. YOU make the decision on what will be tagged, how it will be audited and you ensure your employees are properly trained on alarm response. You may even train them on how they can deter and prevent shoplifting. If you believe you and your management team need training before you train your staff that is available from Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. (LPSI). If you don’t have an anti-theft system they can help you with the purchase of a system and can even demonstrate how affordable it can be with their free ROI Calculator.

     The report told about clothes AND sunglasses being found by police. Sensormatic clothing security tags come in a variety of styles and designs to fit the needs of your particular store. These may include tags with dye packs, small SuperClamp tags or even the powerful Ultra-Gator tag. They also offer the Eyelet hard tag that can protect designer glasses or sunglasses when attached with a cable tie or lanyard. 

     There are no guarantees in life and the same can be said about retail theft. There is a good chance it is going to happen to your store at some point. You may not be able to stop all of it but you also don’t need to be the victim of an organized crime group stealing thousands of dollars in merchandise. Sensormatic tags and systems are an affordable way to protect your business and not be the subject in one of my articles. 
For more information about Sensormatic tags contact us or call 1.866.914.2567.

I don’t want to appear to be dressing you down but if you aren’t using clothing security tags on your merchandise I feel compelled to ask why not? Is it the idea that an anti-theft system would cost too much? Do you believe it is going to cost you the shirt on your back? You might change your mind when you learn about a story I just read from fox43.com, March 23, 2019, “Police recover $100K in stolen merchandise, $40k hidden behind baby crib” by CNN Wire. What was so special about this story? For one thing according to the report, “…over 400 pair of sunglasses stored in display and individual cases valued at approximately $37,000” were recovered. This was on top of clothing police found amounting to, “…over $100,000 worth of stolen merchandise from Lulumon, Victoria Secret, Zumiez, Abercrombie and Fitch, Ralph Lauren – Polo, Hollister, The Disney Store, Tommy Hilfiger, Calvin Klein, Ugg, Nike, Adidas, Champion and Sun Glass Hut.” Those numbers are distressing to someone like me who has been involved in Retail Loss Prevention. I am concerned for the victims of this particular activity but I am even more concerned for the small and medium store owners. The national chains have resources they can rely on to address theft and some use Sensormatic tags on clothing and clothing accessories such as sunglasses.
     

It may have crossed your mind that many of these national chain stores are already using clothing security tags of one type or another. This can prompt the question, “What is the point of using tags at all?” There are a couple of answers to the question. First, in many of these chains not everything in the store is protected with clothing security tags. These businesses focus tagging programs on high theft or their highest price point merchandise. That means shoplifters can still steal the other untagged merchandise and get away with it. I would also suggest that the quality of training received by store associates in responding to alarms caused by Sensormatic tags is probably minimal if any training has taken place. I would go so far as to say there is a good chance that anti-theft equipment is not tested on a daily or even a weekly basis. Faulty equipment can lead to increased theft and professional shoplifters know how to watch to see if alarms are being set off. National chain stores do not necessarily have in-house Loss Prevention Officers so there is no one regularly auditing tagging programs. A District Loss Prevention Manager may conduct periodic audits but again without regular oversight a tagging program often falls to the bottom of store priority lists.
     

For small or independent store owners the use of Sensormatic tags and equipment can have a big impact on theft reduction. YOU make the decision on what will be tagged, how it will be audited and you ensure your employees are properly trained on alarm response. You may even train them on how they can deter and prevent shoplifting. If you believe you and your management team need training before you train your staff that is available from Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. (LPSI). If you don’t have an anti-theft system they can help you with the purchase of a system and can even demonstrate how affordable it can be with their free ROI Calculator.
     

The report told about clothes AND sunglasses being found by police. Sensormatic clothing security tags come in a variety of styles and designs to fit the needs of your particular store. These may include tags with dye packs, small SuperClamp tags or even the powerful Ultra-Gator tag. They also offer the Eyelet hard tag that can protect designer glasses or sunglasses when attached with a cable tie or lanyard. 
     

There are no guarantees in life and the same can be said about retail theft. There is a good chance it is going to happen to your store at some point. You may not be able to stop all of it but you also don’t need to be the victim of an organized crime group stealing thousands of dollars in merchandise. Sensormatic tags and systems are an affordable way to protect your business and not be the subject in one of my articles. 

 

For more information about Sensormatic tags contact us or call 1.866.914.2567.

 

Use Sensormatic Tags The Right Way And Improve Theft Prevention


Sensormatic Tags – 4                                                                                                     WC Blog 751
Clothing Security Tags – 3
Use Sensormatic Tags The Right Way And Improve Theft Prevention
     Clothing security tags work in every store they are used in. In fact they are so effective that according to the Sensormatic Global Retail Shrink Index, Electronic article surveillance (EAS) is the most popular Loss Prevention investment among retailers in the United States. According to their researchers, 92.16% of retailers surveyed indicated they are investing in electronic article surveillance (pg. 45). Certainly the use of clothing security is important but I will tell you that based on my experience, which tags are used and where they are placed are almost as important to a merchandise protection program.

     Effective standardized tagging guidelines for retailers improve the processing of merchandise for cashiers. It makes auditing of tagging easier for managers and it results in fewer customer service complaints. Here are of my suggestions to use as a basis when starting a tagging program:
Tag visibility is important. Hidden tags sound like they would be a deterrent to criminals and in some situations that does work. But most of your shoplifters will be opportunists and if they see the Sensormatic tags they are less likely to try to steal an item. Deterrence is preferred to having to confront a potential shoplifter which can become dangerous.
Hiding clothing security tags can also result in a cashier overlooking them during the checkout process. Since these tags are not designed to deactivate they are going to sound the EAS tower at the doors and create a distraction. The customer may be embarrassed or angry and an employee has to respond and try to determine what caused the alarm. 
Placing tags where they are hard to cover up is also important. For example, a hard tag on the waist of a skirt can be covered by a blouse or sweater if a shoplifter tries to wear it out of the store.
Finally, there are Sensormatic tags and labels. I know that sometimes it is easier to slap a label on a manufacturer hang tag rather than pinning a tag onto a piece of clothing but I always recommend a hard tag on clothing. For a t-shirt or a pair of socks a label may be sufficient but pants, shirts, purses, etc. should always be hard tagged.
Now that I covered what not to do here are my suggestions to help you with a consistent tagging strategy:
Tag pants in a seam near the knee. Also do it on the same leg of every pair of slacks, jeans pants etc. Cashiers will always know to look for the Sensormatic tags in the same place. If you find this is more effort than you want to put into it you can tag near the cuff, but do it several inches above the end of the leg. 
Shoes can be a bit more difficult since people want to try them on. Additionally not all shoes are designed the same. If possible tag through an eyelet, buckle or strap. IF there is no choice, a Sensormatic label may serve as a substitute on the bottom of each shoe.
Attach clothing security tags to the neckline. This ensures the tag is visible and it is very hard to hide this. If you make the choice to tag on a sleeve, as with pants, do it several inches above the end of the sleeve. A small cut in the garment can be easy to repair and the tag slipped off. Cut in a piece of clothing anywhere else renders it unserviceable and useless.
Purses generally have loops and straps that are accommodating for tags making them easy for protecting. Wallets on the other hand may be more challenging. This is one of the situations where I believe it is warranted to use a Sensormatic label hidden in the merchandise. The key is to emphasize that cashiers be sure to run all wallets over deactivation pads to avoid those false alarms.
These are strategies that I used for many years as a Retail Loss Prevention Manager and I can attest to the effectiveness of following these suggestions. We were consistently bringing in shortage numbers well under 1% during my tenure. 

     Sensormatic is a trusted company in the Loss Prevention industry and their equipment is so effective in preventing shoplifting that Bill Bregar, owner of Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. recommends their products to his clients. Why is that important? It is important because Bill has been in the business of retail shortage prevention and consultation since 1983. He was also a Loss Prevention Director for major retail stores. When Bill and I are in agreement it means you can’t go wrong if you listen to us. Use Sensormatic tags and see how much you can improve your bottom line.
 For more information about clothing security tags contact us or call 1.866.914.2567

Clothing security tags work in every store they are used in. In fact they are so effective that according to the Sensormatic Global Retail Shrink Index, Electronic article surveillance (EAS) is the most popular Loss Prevention investment among retailers in the United States. According to their researchers, 92.16% of retailers surveyed indicated they are investing in electronic article surveillance (pg. 45). Certainly the use of clothing security is important but I will tell you that based on my experience, which tags are used and where they are placed are almost as important to a merchandise protection program.
     

Effective standardized tagging guidelines for retailers improve the processing of merchandise for cashiers. It makes auditing of tagging easier for managers and it results in fewer customer service complaints. Here are of my suggestions to use as a basis when starting a tagging program:

Tag visibility is important. Hidden tags sound like they would be a deterrent to criminals and in some situations that does work. But most of your shoplifters will be opportunists and if they see the Sensormatic tags they are less likely to try to steal an item. Deterrence is preferred to having to confront a potential shoplifter which can become dangerous.

Hiding clothing security tags can also result in a cashier overlooking them during the checkout process. Since these tags are not designed to deactivate they are going to sound the EAS tower at the doors and create a distraction. The customer may be embarrassed or angry and an employee has to respond and try to determine what caused the alarm. 

Placing tags where they are hard to cover up is also important. For example, a hard tag on the waist of a skirt can be covered by a blouse or sweater if a shoplifter tries to wear it out of the store.

Finally, there are Sensormatic tags and labels. I know that sometimes it is easier to slap a label on a manufacturer hang tag rather than pinning a tag onto a piece of clothing but I always recommend a hard tag on clothing. For a t-shirt or a pair of socks a label may be sufficient but pants, shirts, purses, etc. should always be hard tagged.

 

Now that I covered what not to do here are my suggestions to help you with a consistent tagging strategy:

Tag pants in a seam near the knee. Also do it on the same leg of every pair of slacks, jeans pants etc. Cashiers will always know to look for the Sensormatic tags in the same place. If you find this is more effort than you want to put into it you can tag near the cuff, but do it several inches above the end of the leg. 

Shoes can be a bit more difficult since people want to try them on. Additionally not all shoes are designed the same. If possible tag through an eyelet, buckle or strap. IF there is no choice, a Sensormatic label may serve as a substitute on the bottom of each shoe.

Attach clothing security tags to the neckline. This ensures the tag is visible and it is very hard to hide this. If you make the choice to tag on a sleeve, as with pants, do it several inches above the end of the sleeve. A small cut in the garment can be easy to repair and the tag slipped off. Cut in a piece of clothing anywhere else renders it unserviceable and useless.

Purses generally have loops and straps that are accommodating for tags making them easy for protecting. Wallets on the other hand may be more challenging. This is one of the situations where I believe it is warranted to use a Sensormatic label hidden in the merchandise. The key is to emphasize that cashiers be sure to run all wallets over deactivation pads to avoid those false alarms.

These are strategies that I used for many years as a Retail Loss Prevention Manager and I can attest to the effectiveness of following these suggestions. We were consistently bringing in shortage numbers well under 1% during my tenure. 

 

 Sensormatic is a trusted company in the Loss Prevention industry and their equipment is so effective in preventing shoplifting that Bill Bregar, owner of Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. recommends their products to his clients. Why is that important? It is important because Bill has been in the business of retail shortage prevention and consultation since 1983. He was also a Loss Prevention Director for major retail stores. When Bill and I are in agreement it means you can’t go wrong if you listen to us. Use Sensormatic tags and see how much you can improve your bottom line. 

 

For more information about clothing security tags, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567