Hard Tags Improve Shortage and SAFETY

Clothing security tags-4                                                                                                        WC Blog 545
Checkpoint Tags-4

Checkpoint Tags Improve Shortage and SAFETY

     I’m frustrated and angry as I read a story of a shoplifting incident that resulted in the death of an innocent bystander. The loss of life and the whole incident could possibly have been avoided if clothing security tags had been in use by the store where the shoplifting took place.
http://www.newson6.com/story/37377335/senseless-act-led-to-death-of-bystander-tahlequah-police-chief-says
According to the report the alleged shoplifter was attempting to steal clothing. The report indicated the suspect was seen in camera footage filling his shopping cart with clothes. “Next he’s seen walking out the door with what police said is a bag of stolen items.” The suspect is accused of fleeing from police in a pick-up truck. While attempting to elude police the suspect ran into another vehicle and the driver of that car was killed. I am angry that the shoplifter tried to commit a crime and then placed others in jeopardy in his effort to escape. I am angry that there are those who would use this incident to justify the position that stores should just allow criminals (and that’s what they are…shoplifting is a crime) to leave. They argue that confronting a shoplifter poses a danger to store personnel and customers. I am also concerned about the apparent lack of security tags on clothes. The retailer is a well-known chain and I have shopped in their stores. I do not recall seeing any Checkpoint tags used on clothing in their locations. While tags are not a guarantee to stop shoplifting they do provide a strong deterrence to the crime.

     Clothing security tags are devices that are equipped with electronic article surveillance (EAS) technology that works in unison with Checkpoint pedestals. The EAS tech in the tags sends off a radio frequency wave that is received by a pedestal when it is carried into the detection field of the pedestal. When the pedestal picks up the signal of the tag alarms are set off creating a very loud beeping noise. Store personnel respond to these alarms and verify customer receipts against the merchandise they are taking out of the store. When done appropriately these receipt checks result in a “shopper” returning the merchandise or purchasing it. The beauty of Checkpoint tags is that they prevent shoplifting and attempts at shoplifting just by being attached to clothes. Shoplifters are not in the habit of wanting to advertise to store employees what they are doing. They want to get in, steal and get out. They know what the tags are and they generally steer clear of merchandise that is protected. 

          I am aware that some readers are going to think that I am saying clothing security tags would have saved the victim’s life in this case. I am not going to go that far. There were a number of factors that came into play and I am not aware of them all. For example, I read that the subject had a track record of fleeing from police in prior incidents. One report alleged the suspect would see a police car and speed away without any indications the officer even noticed him. I also have no idea if he was approached at the doors of the store or if he was approached, what that interaction looked like. I have had shoplifters run from me for absolutely no reason at all except that they thought they were being followed. No, this unfortunate tragedy may have happened with or without the use of Checkpoint tags but I believe that the use of tags MAY have deterred the suspect and sent him elsewhere or changed his decision to try to steal.

     Bill Bregar and his team at Loss Prevention Systems Inc. know that there are dangers associated with shoplifting and want to eliminate that risk. This is why they trust Checkpoint tags and pedestals when recommending safety and security strategies to retail owners. Checkpoint’s equipment has a proven track record of success in shortage reduction and a natural consequence is improved safety for the store.

     There is nothing funny or cute about shoplifting. There are financial costs associated with the crime that impact the store owner and their legitimate customers. There can also be tragic consequences as seen in the referenced case. Use clothing security tags on your merchandise and reduce the chances that your employees or innocent bystanders will be injured or harmed due to criminal shoplifters.
Get more information on Checkpoint tags, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.

I’m frustrated and angry as I read a story of a shoplifting incident that resulted in the death of an innocent bystander. The loss of life and the whole incident could possibly have been avoided if clothing security tags had been in use by the store where the shoplifting took place.

http://www.newson6.com/story/37377335/senseless-act-led-to-death-of-bystander-tahlequah-police-chief-says

According to the report the alleged shoplifter was attempting to steal clothing. The report indicated the suspect was seen in camera footage filling his shopping cart with clothes. “Next he’s seen walking out the door with what police said is a bag of stolen items.” The suspect is accused of fleeing from police in a pick-up truck. While attempting to elude police the suspect ran into another vehicle and the driver of that car was killed. I am angry that the shoplifter tried to commit a crime and then placed others in jeopardy in his effort to escape. I am angry that there are those who would use this incident to justify the position that stores should just allow criminals (and that’s what they are…shoplifting is a crime) to leave. They argue that confronting a shoplifter poses a danger to store personnel and customers. I am also concerned about the apparent lack of security tags on clothes. The retailer is a well-known chain and I have shopped in their stores. I do not recall seeing any hard tags used on clothing in their locations. While tags are not a guarantee to stop shoplifting they do provide a strong deterrence to the crime.
     

Clothing security tags are devices that are equipped with electronic article surveillance (EAS) technology that works in unison with EAS pedestals. The EAS tech in the tags sends off a radio frequency wave that is received by a pedestal when it is carried into the detection field of the pedestal. When the pedestal picks up the signal of the tag, alarms are set off creating a very loud beeping noise. Store personnel respond to these alarms and verify customer receipts against the merchandise they are taking out of the store. When done appropriately these receipt checks result in a “shopper” returning the merchandise or purchasing it. The beauty of hard tags is that they prevent shoplifting and attempts at shoplifting just by being attached to clothes. Shoplifters are not in the habit of wanting to advertise to store employees what they are doing. They want to get in, steal and get out. They know what the tags are and they generally steer clear of merchandise that is protected. 
         

I am aware that some readers are going to think that I am saying clothing security tags would have saved the victim’s life in this case. I am not going to go that far. There were a number of factors that came into play and I am not aware of them all. For example, I read that the subject had a track record of fleeing from police in prior incidents. One report alleged the suspect would see a police car and speed away without any indications the officer even noticed him. I also have no idea if he was approached at the doors of the store or if he was approached, what that interaction looked like. I have had shoplifters run from me for absolutely no reason at all except that they thought they were being followed. No, this unfortunate tragedy may have happened with or without the use of hard tags but I believe that the use of tags MAY have deterred the suspect and sent him elsewhere or changed his decision to try to steal.
     

Bill Bregar and his team at Loss Prevention Systems Inc. know that there are dangers associated with shoplifting and want to eliminate that risk. This is why they trust hard tags and pedestals when recommending safety and security strategies to retail owners. 
     

There is nothing funny or cute about shoplifting. There are financial costs associated with the crime that impact the store owner and their legitimate customers. There can also be tragic consequences as seen in the referenced case. Use clothing security tags on your merchandise and reduce the chances that your employees or innocent bystanders will be injured or harmed due to criminal shoplifters.

 

Get more information on hard tags, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.

Using Checkpoint Tags Can Reduce The Threat From ORC Groups

Clothing Security -5                                                                                                 WC blog 485
Checkpoint Tags-4

Using Checkpoint Tags Can Reduce The Threat From ORC Groups

     Clothing security should always be a concern for retailers who sell this type of merchandise. But having recently read an article in a trade publication about the rise of Organized Retail Crime (ORC) I am concerned that theft is not as much of a focus as it should be. In a recent article in LPM Insider titled “2017 Survey Reveals Organized Retail Crime’s Top Stolen Items”, by Jac Brittain, LPC, November 20, 2017, the author points out three disturbing facts. First, “According to the 2017 study, organized retail crime is again on the rise.” Second, “Resources (to fight ORC) are down as other areas of the business are demanding greater attention by retail executives.” And third, three of the top stolen products according to the survey are designer clothing, jeans and purses out of eleven named products types. http://losspreventionmedia.com/insider/shoplifting-organized-retail-crime/2017-survey-reveals-organized-retail-crimes-top-stolen-items/  I am left to wonder if the resources used to fight Organized Retail Theft are limited to a reduction in personnel or if it includes the use of Checkpoint tags. One clarification I want to make for readers who do not know what ORC Groups are. Organized Retail Crime groups are comprised of professional thieves who use a structured team to steal from retailers and they then resell those products. These organizations may even open legitimate looking stores as a front for moving stolen products. 

     If the reduction of resources includes Checkpoint Tags I am then forced to ask the question, “Why?” When it comes to clothing security these simple tags make a world of difference. They are large enough to be easily seen by criminals who know what they are and what they do. Shoplifters who choose to take a stab at trying to remove a tag forcefully usually rip and tear merchandise and render it useless. Then there are the thieves who are willing to try to steal and sneak tagged merchandise past electronic article surveillance pedestals. This leads to the pedestals alarms and lights sounding and flashing which, in turn, results in employees answering the alarm and getting the merchandise back. Occasionally the recovery is from a receipt check and other times it is due to the thief being scared and dropping the items in an effort to avoid prosecution or capture. All of this is in addition to the fact that the tags are reusable. Unlike a throw away device the Checkpoint tags are designed to be used over and over again with the same outstanding performance. There is no reason to reduce the use of this clothing security device since there is rarely a need for adding too many at one time to your inventory. That is unless you are adding more products to your sales floor because you are increasing your sales.

      Back to the first concern the author raised, that Organized Retail Crime is on the rise again, I am not sure what is driving this. Is it a matter of criminals realizing that resources are not being dedicated to clothing security or retail loss prevention? Do they understand that many brick and mortar retail establishments are struggling to keep their doors open and trying to allocate the resources and time to do that? I am not advocating unlimited resources to stop theft that would be unrealistic. I recognize that sometimes there has to be some assessment of the business to ensure fiscal stability. What I DO think can happen is a strategic allocation of people based on the use of door counting systems and the tagging of all merchandise to deter theft. Rather than reducing the number of sku’s being tagged to prevent theft I say tag more.

      The next two points in the article was the breakdown of what is primarily chosen by ORC groups and that included three clothing categories. ORC groups are targeting clothing and if the resource being reduced includes clothing security tags I don’t understand the reasoning. Tagging products is proven to reduce theft. Stores only need to maintain their Checkpoint electronic article surveillance tower and devote some payroll to keep products tagged. The return on investment is the increase in sales due to having merchandise in stock. It is also the savings the store has in the merchandise that stays in the store and doesn’t get stolen. How much focus on other operational issues do stores need to improve sales when the ability to save money is right under their noses?

     A rise in ORC doesn’t have to scare you. Use Checkpoint tags on ALL of the clothes and clothing accessories you sell in the store. Tagging products and ensuring proper staffing to tag, provide customer service and respond to electronic article surveillance alarms will drive up sales.
For more information about Checkpoint tags contact us or call 1.866.914.2567.

      

Clothing security should always be a concern for retailers who sell this type of merchandise. But having recently read an article in a trade publication about the rise of Organized Retail Crime (ORC) I am concerned that theft is not as much of a focus as it should be. In a recent article in LPM Insider titled “2017 Survey Reveals Organized Retail Crime’s Top Stolen Items”, by Jac Brittain, LPC, November 20, 2017, the author points out three disturbing facts. First, “According to the 2017 study, organized retail crime is again on the rise.” Second, “Resources (to fight ORC) are down as other areas of the business are demanding greater attention by retail executives.” And third, three of the top stolen products according to the survey are designer clothing, jeans and purses out of eleven named products types. http://losspreventionmedia.com/insider/shoplifting-organized-retail-crime/2017-survey-reveals-organized-retail-crimes-top-stolen-items/  I am left to wonder if the resources used to fight Organized Retail Theft are limited to a reduction in personnel or if it includes the use of Checkpoint tags. One clarification I want to make for readers who do not know what ORC Groups are. Organized Retail Crime groups are comprised of professional thieves who use a structured team to steal from retailers and they then resell those products. These organizations may even open legitimate looking stores as a front for moving stolen products. 
     

If the reduction of resources includes Checkpoint Tags I am then forced to ask the question, “Why?” When it comes to clothing security these simple tags make a world of difference. They are large enough to be easily seen by criminals who know what they are and what they do. Shoplifters who choose to take a stab at trying to remove a tag forcefully usually rip and tear merchandise and render it useless. Then there are the thieves who are willing to try to steal and sneak tagged merchandise past electronic article surveillance pedestals. This leads to the pedestals alarms and lights sounding and flashing which, in turn, results in employees answering the alarm and getting the merchandise back. Occasionally the recovery is from a receipt check and other times it is due to the thief being scared and dropping the items in an effort to avoid prosecution or capture. All of this is in addition to the fact that the tags are reusable. Unlike a throw away device the Checkpoint tags are designed to be used over and over again with the same outstanding performance. There is no reason to reduce the use of this clothing security device since there is rarely a need for adding too many at one time to your inventory. That is unless you are adding more products to your sales floor because you are increasing your sales.
     

Back to the first concern the author raised, that Organized Retail Crime is on the rise again, I am not sure what is driving this. Is it a matter of criminals realizing that resources are not being dedicated to clothing security or retail loss prevention? Do they understand that many brick and mortar retail establishments are struggling to keep their doors open and trying to allocate the resources and time to do that? I am not advocating unlimited resources to stop theft that would be unrealistic. I recognize that sometimes there has to be some assessment of the business to ensure fiscal stability. What I DO think can happen is a strategic allocation of people based on the use of door counting systems and the tagging of all merchandise to deter theft. Rather than reducing the number of sku’s being tagged to prevent theft I say tag more.
     

The next two points in the article was the breakdown of what is primarily chosen by ORC groups and that included three clothing categories. ORC groups are targeting clothing and if the resource being reduced includes clothing security tags I don’t understand the reasoning. Tagging products is proven to reduce theft. Stores only need to maintain their Checkpoint electronic article surveillance tower and devote some payroll to keep products tagged. The return on investment is the increase in sales due to having merchandise in stock. It is also the savings the store has in the merchandise that stays in the store and doesn’t get stolen. How much focus on other operational issues do stores need to improve sales when the ability to save money is right under their noses?
     

A rise in ORC doesn’t have to scare you. Use Checkpoint tags on ALL of the clothes and clothing accessories you sell in the store. Tagging products and ensuring proper staffing to tag, provide customer service and respond to electronic article surveillance alarms will drive up sales.

 

For more information about Checkpoint tags contact us or call 1.866.914.2567.
      

 

Checkpoint Tags Help Offset Tight Employee Budgets

Clothing security- 4                                                                                                             WC Blog 524
Checkpoint tags-5


Checkpoint Tags Help Offset Tight Employee Budgets 

     Clothing security can be difficult for small and medium size retailers that have limited resources. As a Retail Loss prevention Manager I had to deal with shoplifters and employees who have stolen clothes so I have seen the various methods employed by criminals. One of the favorite forms of theft for shoplifters and I include employees in this, is the use of fitting rooms and restrooms to commit their crimes. Rather than trying to hide merchandise in a purse, shopping bag or under their clothing and risk being observed by store cameras or plain clothes security they go where they know that cameras are not permitted. Thieves know that most stores restrict Loss Prevention personnel from making what are known as “fitting room” stops and the same applies to restrooms. In order to prevent shoplifting many of the large retailers will spend payroll on a fitting room attendant. This person’s job is supposed to be taking all merchandise from a customer, separating the items, inspecting to be sure nothing is in between items and there are not multiple items on a single hanger. It may not be feasible for smaller stores to spend scarce payroll dollars on a fitting room attendant. This is where clothing security can be enhanced in the form of Checkpoint tags available from Loss Prevention Systems Inc.

      Checkpoint tags for clothing are available in a sturdy design that is built to prevent shoplifters from defeating them. Tugged, pulled, pried or beaten on these tags will hold up to the most severe punishment. Of course it should be pointed out that in my encounters with anyone trying to pull a tag off of clothing they are usually putting so much effort into it they become obvious. Those shoplifters that choose to try to conceal tagged clothing and attempt to get out of a store will set off an electronic article surveillance (EAS) alarm pedestal. The alarms and lights of the pedestals are so bright and noisy that employees respond and recover merchandise through a check of the culprit’s receipt. An employee well trained on appropriate EAS alarm response knows how to keep encounters calm and recover merchandise without a nasty confrontation.

     The question arises, “Why can’t I just look in a fitting room and if there are empty hangers then I can simply stop the suspect?” You can never be absolutely sure that a hanger is an indicator of theft. Some people try on clothes and if they find a garment they like they don’t bother putting it back on a hanger. When I was a Loss Prevention Associate and brand new to the retail world I worked in a department store. I vividly recall going into a fitting room and bringing out a handful of clothes hangers. I showed them to the associates at the register and told them that someone had probably stolen the items that went on those hangers. The associates were none too pleased with me, a guy new to L.P. and retail. One of the associates took the hangers and told me that they do count items going in and out, not necessarily hangers. That associate, who is now my wife, kindly reminds me of that encounter from time to time to keep me humble. Clothing security was a priority then and items were counted but we did not use Checkpoint tags as much then as we should have. Clothing alarm tags can reduce the need to have a fitting room attendant for stores without the payroll to staff that position.

     Restrooms can be another problem altogether because they are often in a corner or out of the main aisles of the store. EAS towers can be placed outside of the restrooms and if merchandise with Checkpoint tags is taken in the tower alarms will sound there too. Towers can’t be placed outside of a fitting room because the purpose of a fitting room is to take merchandise in to try on. Security tags on clothes provide protection for retailers when they can’t afford to place a person at the fitting room. As I mentioned if they tamper with tags they will damage the clothes, leave the tags in place and they will activate alarms. 

      If you have the resources to afford a fitting room attendant to stop shoplifting then continue to do so and let Checkpoint tags be a supplement to your security efforts. If you don’t have the resources, tag all of your merchandise with clothing security tags and watch your profits grow.
Get more information on Checkpoint tags, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.

     

Clothing security can be difficult for small and medium size retailers that have limited resources. As a Retail Loss prevention Manager I had to deal with shoplifters and employees who have stolen clothes so I have seen the various methods employed by criminals. One of the favorite forms of theft for shoplifters and I include employees in this, is the use of fitting rooms and restrooms to commit their crimes. Rather than trying to hide merchandise in a purse, shopping bag or under their clothing and risk being observed by store cameras or plain clothes security they go where they know that cameras are not permitted. Thieves know that most stores restrict Loss Prevention personnel from making what are known as “fitting room” stops and the same applies to restrooms. In order to prevent shoplifting many of the large retailers will spend payroll on a fitting room attendant. This person’s job is supposed to be taking all merchandise from a customer, separating the items, inspecting to be sure nothing is in between items and there are not multiple items on a single hanger. It may not be feasible for smaller stores to spend scarce payroll dollars on a fitting room attendant. This is where clothing security can be enhanced in the form of Checkpoint tags available from Loss Prevention Systems Inc.
     

Checkpoint tags for clothing are available in a sturdy design that is built to prevent shoplifters from defeating them. Tugged, pulled, pried or beaten on these tags will hold up to the most severe punishment. Of course it should be pointed out that in my encounters with anyone trying to pull a tag off of clothing they are usually putting so much effort into it they become obvious. Those shoplifters that choose to try to conceal tagged clothing and attempt to get out of a store will set off an electronic article surveillance (EAS) alarm pedestal. The alarms and lights of the pedestals are so bright and noisy that employees respond and recover merchandise through a check of the culprit’s receipt. An employee well trained on appropriate EAS alarm response knows how to keep encounters calm and recover merchandise without a nasty confrontation.
     

The question arises, “Why can’t I just look in a fitting room and if there are empty hangers then I can simply stop the suspect?” You can never be absolutely sure that a hanger is an indicator of theft. Some people try on clothes and if they find a garment they like they don’t bother putting it back on a hanger. When I was a Loss Prevention Associate and brand new to the retail world I worked in a department store. I vividly recall going into a fitting room and bringing out a handful of clothes hangers. I showed them to the associates at the register and told them that someone had probably stolen the items that went on those hangers. The associates were none too pleased with me, a guy new to L.P. and retail. One of the associates took the hangers and told me that they do count items going in and out, not necessarily hangers. That associate, who is now my wife, kindly reminds me of that encounter from time to time to keep me humble. Clothing security was a priority then and items were counted but we did not use Checkpoint tags as much then as we should have. Clothing alarm tags can reduce the need to have a fitting room attendant for stores without the payroll to staff that position.
     

Restrooms can be another problem altogether because they are often in a corner or out of the main aisles of the store. EAS towers can be placed outside of the restrooms and if merchandise with Checkpoint tags is taken in the tower alarms will sound there too. Towers can’t be placed outside of a fitting room because the purpose of a fitting room is to take merchandise in to try on. Security tags on clothes provide protection for retailers when they can’t afford to place a person at the fitting room. As I mentioned if they tamper with tags they will damage the clothes, leave the tags in place and they will activate alarms. 
     

If you have the resources to afford a fitting room attendant to stop shoplifting then continue to do so and let Checkpoint tags be a supplement to your security efforts. If you don’t have the resources, tag all of your merchandise with clothing security tags and watch your profits grow.

 

Get more information on Checkpoint tags, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.