The Best Shortage Reduction Programs Always Include Clothing Security Tags



Clothing Security –  4                                                                                                                WC blog 848
Clothing security tags – 3



The Best Shortage Reduction Programs Always Include Clothing Security Tags 

     It can be difficult to decide the best clothing security to use to protect your merchandise from theft. Do you rely on fantastic customer service to dissuade potential pilferers from scooting out with unpaid goods? Do you have fitting room practices in place to prevent hidden goods from being secreted into a dressing room? Perhaps you use closed circuit television cameras and monitors to deter criminals from stealing clothing. Each of these is a good tool in the fight against merchandise shortage but if this is all you are doing then you are missing a critical element in your tool chest.

         Sensormatic’s electronic article surveillance towers and clothing security tags are essential for those store owners who are looking for effective methods to reduce shortage. For one thing the tags are nearly impossible to remove without damaging the merchandise. They are built so that a Sensormatic detachment tool is required to take the tag off of an item. I confess that as a Loss Prevention Officer I wanted to see how difficult it really would be to forcibly remove  clothing security tags so I attempted to pry one off of a shirt. The shirt was damaged already so I wasn’t destroying anything of value. I can say that the tag did not come off and as I recall I did end up damaging the product more in the process. Since I had a pretty good understanding of how the tags worked I can only imagine the damage a shoplifter would do to a garment if they were able to get a tagged article of clothing out of a store. 

 
     Sensormatic products alone are a strong deterrent to criminals. They don’t want to damage merchandise. Whether they intend to sell it to make money, trade the clothes for drugs or take the goods for their own use the majority of shoplifters recognize the damage tags will cause of forcibly removed. That removes the incentive to try to steal in the first place. Most people also understand what electronic article surveillance systems do and that includes shoplifters. The potential risk of setting off a Sensormatic security alarm and getting caught is another deterrent that prevents theft from taking place.

     Are these risks associated with Sensormatic tags enough to impede all shoplifters? I would say no. A system may work as a standalone clothing security measure for a time but when crooks see that no one responds to alarm activations they no longer fear being stopped. An effective clothing security program will incorporate training employees on how to properly react to electronic article surveillance alarms. Waving at a customer who has just set off a Sensormatic alarm pedestal only reinforces to thieves that alarms are not taken seriously at a store where this happens. Ongoing training with employees is an important part of an overall shortage reduction program for a store. There are right and wrong ways to stop people who set off alarms.

     I mentioned at the beginning of this article that there are other tools that retailers use in their efforts to enhance clothing security. Fitting room controls is one of my favorite areas to focus theft prevention. The reason is the privacy afforded thieves when they enter a fitting room. They know stores cannot place closed circuit television cameras or mirrors here. They hide merchandise and clothing articles between draped pieces of clothing and walk in. While in the room they either change into the clothing hidden between layers of merchandise they are carrying or they conceal those items in a bag, backpack, purse etc. Scheduling an associate to work the fitting room and separate merchandise being taken into a room is a strong deterrent to shoplifting. I cannot tell you how much merchandise I have seen good fitting room attendants recover. 

     In order to stop shoplifting and improve your profits you must have a comprehensive program in place. Start  a program with a great customer service culture add clothing security tags and a Sensormatic system and a fitting room attendant and you will be well on your way. Help is always just a phone call away.     


For more information on clothing security contact us or call 1.866.914.2567      

It can be difficult to decide the best clothing security to use to protect your merchandise from theft. Do you rely on fantastic customer service to dissuade potential pilferers from scooting out with unpaid goods? Do you have fitting room practices in place to prevent hidden goods from being secreted into a dressing room? Perhaps you use closed circuit television cameras and monitors to deter criminals from stealing clothing. Each of these is a good tool in the fight against merchandise shortage but if this is all you are doing then you are missing a critical element in your tool chest.
         

Sensormatic’s electronic article surveillance towers and clothing security tags are essential for those store owners who are looking for effective methods to reduce shortage. For one thing the tags are nearly impossible to remove without damaging the merchandise. They are built so that a Sensormatic detachment tool is required to take the tag off of an item. I confess that as a Loss Prevention Officer I wanted to see how difficult it really would be to forcibly remove  clothing security tags so I attempted to pry one off of a shirt. The shirt was damaged already so I wasn’t destroying anything of value. I can say that the tag did not come off and as I recall I did end up damaging the product more in the process. Since I had a pretty good understanding of how the tags worked I can only imagine the damage a shoplifter would do to a garment if they were able to get a tagged article of clothing out of a store. 
      

Sensormatic products alone are a strong deterrent to criminals. They don’t want to damage merchandise. Whether they intend to sell it to make money, trade the clothes for drugs or take the goods for their own use the majority of shoplifters recognize the damage tags will cause of forcibly removed. That removes the incentive to try to steal in the first place. Most people also understand what electronic article surveillance systems do and that includes shoplifters. The potential risk of setting off a Sensormatic security alarm and getting caught is another deterrent that prevents theft from taking place.
     

Are these risks associated with Sensormatic tags enough to impede all shoplifters? I would say no. A system may work as a standalone clothing security measure for a time but when crooks see that no one responds to alarm activations they no longer fear being stopped. An effective clothing security program will incorporate training employees on how to properly react to electronic article surveillance alarms. Waving at a customer who has just set off a Sensormatic alarm pedestal only reinforces to thieves that alarms are not taken seriously at a store where this happens. Ongoing training with employees is an important part of an overall shortage reduction program for a store. There are right and wrong ways to stop people who set off alarms.
     

I mentioned at the beginning of this article that there are other tools that retailers use in their efforts to enhance clothing security. Fitting room controls is one of my favorite areas to focus theft prevention. The reason is the privacy afforded thieves when they enter a fitting room. They know stores cannot place closed circuit television cameras or mirrors here. They hide merchandise and clothing articles between draped pieces of clothing and walk in. While in the room they either change into the clothing hidden between layers of merchandise they are carrying or they conceal those items in a bag, backpack, purse etc. Scheduling an associate to work the fitting room and separate merchandise being taken into a room is a strong deterrent to shoplifting. I cannot tell you how much merchandise I have seen good fitting room attendants recover. 
     

In order to stop shoplifting and improve your profits you must have a comprehensive program in place. Start  a program with a great customer service culture add clothing security tags and a Sensormatic system and a fitting room attendant and you will be well on your way. Help is always just a phone call away.     

 

 For more information on clothing security contact us or call 1.866.914.2567      

 

 

Anti-shoplifting Efforts And Stubborn Customers

Anti-shoplifting – 4                                                                                                                    WC Blog 841
Sensormatic security system-4

Anti-shoplifting Efforts And Stubborn Customers

     I just saw a clip on my Facebook feed where a uniformed store security was following anti-shoplifting protocols for a store and asking for a receipt check. I don’t know why I put myself through these painful videos because they tend to just get me angry. I was angry because the customer who filmed the episode was obviously being obnoxious on purpose and trying to start something. His capturing of the event on his phone made that apparent. I was angry that the security officer did not have a better response to the “customer” and the manager who was called over was less helpful. By the end of the two or three minute clip I wanted to snatch that phone and break it. When the store manager decided to just let the obnoxious customer just leave the video recording continued and the manager and security officer asked him to stop and he wouldn’t. I could not tell if there was a Sensormatic security system in use in this store but if there was I would have liked to see what would have happened if the alarm had sounded.

     During my tenure as a Loss Prevention Manager I came across similar situations and empathize with the Security Officer. There is no clear-cut right or wrong answer to this problem. I have looked at number of websites with lawyers giving advice to “legal” websites. The interesting thing is on one website with several lawyers giving their input some say a store has a right to briefly detain those suspected of shoplifting and recommend you stop and show a receipt. They argue it helps keep prices lower for everyone. Others say you are not required to stop and that they keep walking. Others give a short response saying that if you are offended don’t shop there anymore. One response did say that stopping for a receipt check is a requirement of membership for club type stores like Costco. There are even testy debates on websites about whether you are required to stop for a Sensormatic security system or similar alarm activation. Does this qualify as grounds for reasonable detainment?

     To be perfectly frank the issue is there is no federal guideline. Each state has their own laws governing ”Shopkeeper’s Privilege” and what is a reasonable detainment. Anti-shoplifting laws are not universal and therefore as a store owner it is incumbent on you to be familiar with the laws of your own state. This brings up the question of whether it makes sense to even have a person at the door to help prevent shoplifting or a Sensormatic system to discourage thieves? 

     I believe it is in the best interest of stores to have an anti-shoplifting system in place. This is no different than having closed circuit television cameras, camera domes and monitors in a store. They do help deter impulse thieves. These are the people who come in and without a lot of forethought decide to steal as a thrill or on a dare or even peer-pressure. A Sensormatic security system with towers at the doors and merchandise with security tags is usually enough to make these people change their mind about stealing. Even some of the shoplifters who are stealing for drugs are stopped when they realize a security system is in use. The only ones who may not be deterred are the hardcore criminals or organized crime groups who you may not want to be dealing with anyways other than through customer service.

     What about a receipt checker at the door? Most people are going to be cooperative and willing to show a receipt. There are some who are going to refuse. I can only suggest that if you are going to have someone at the door you have a consistent policy of only asking for a receipt on exposed merchandise (meaning merchandise not in a bag from your store). You also need to ensure if employees are responding to a Sensormatic security system alarm that your employees are trained on how to do so properly. Never accuse someone of shoplifting simply because an alarm sounds. It could be a cashier failed to remove a clothing security tag from a shirt or jeans. The great thing is if you aren’t sure your employees are trained properly on alarm response or you don’t have a Sensormatic system, Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. offers training and if you purchase an anti-shoplifting system from them you get FREE training to go along with it.

     There is no easy answer to the problem of receipt checks. Hopefully I have given you a few helpful tips on how to try to resolve the issue. It is important to keep in mind that most honest shoppers will be willing to show receipts in order to help stop shoplifting and keep prices low.
A Sensormatic security system is important and we can help you with it. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.



     

I just saw a clip on my Facebook feed where a uniformed store security was following anti-shoplifting protocols for a store and asking for a receipt check. I don’t know why I put myself through these painful videos because they tend to just get me angry. I was angry because the customer who filmed the episode was obviously being obnoxious on purpose and trying to start something. His capturing of the event on his phone made that apparent. I was angry that the security officer did not have a better response to the “customer” and the manager who was called over was less helpful. By the end of the two or three minute clip I wanted to snatch that phone and break it. When the store manager decided to just let the obnoxious customer just leave the video recording continued and the manager and security officer asked him to stop and he wouldn’t. I could not tell if there was a Sensormatic security system in use in this store but if there was I would have liked to see what would have happened if the alarm had sounded.
     

During my tenure as a Loss Prevention Manager I came across similar situations and empathize with the Security Officer. There is no clear-cut right or wrong answer to this problem. I have looked at number of websites with lawyers giving advice to “legal” websites. The interesting thing is on one website with several lawyers giving their input some say a store has a right to briefly detain those suspected of shoplifting and recommend you stop and show a receipt. They argue it helps keep prices lower for everyone. Others say you are not required to stop and that they keep walking. Others give a short response saying that if you are offended don’t shop there anymore. One response did say that stopping for a receipt check is a requirement of membership for club type stores like Costco. There are even testy debates on websites about whether you are required to stop for a Sensormatic security system or similar alarm activation. Does this qualify as grounds for reasonable detainment?
     

To be perfectly frank the issue is there is no federal guideline. Each state has their own laws governing ”Shopkeeper’s Privilege” and what is a reasonable detainment. Anti-shoplifting laws are not universal and therefore as a store owner it is incumbent on you to be familiar with the laws of your own state. This brings up the question of whether it makes sense to even have a person at the door to help prevent shoplifting or a Sensormatic system to discourage thieves? 
     

I believe it is in the best interest of stores to have an anti-shoplifting system in place. This is no different than having closed circuit television cameras, camera domes and monitors in a store. They do help deter impulse thieves. These are the people who come in and without a lot of forethought decide to steal as a thrill or on a dare or even peer-pressure. A Sensormatic security system with towers at the doors and merchandise with security tags is usually enough to make these people change their mind about stealing. Even some of the shoplifters who are stealing for drugs are stopped when they realize a security system is in use. The only ones who may not be deterred are the hardcore criminals or organized crime groups who you may not want to be dealing with anyways other than through customer service.
     

What about a receipt checker at the door? Most people are going to be cooperative and willing to show a receipt. There are some who are going to refuse. I can only suggest that if you are going to have someone at the door you have a consistent policy of only asking for a receipt on exposed merchandise (meaning merchandise not in a bag from your store). You also need to ensure if employees are responding to a Sensormatic security system alarm that your employees are trained on how to do so properly. Never accuse someone of shoplifting simply because an alarm sounds. It could be a cashier failed to remove a clothing security tag from a shirt or jeans. The great thing is if you aren’t sure your employees are trained properly on alarm response or you don’t have a Sensormatic system, Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. offers training and if you purchase an anti-shoplifting system from them you get FREE training to go along with it.
     

There is no easy answer to the problem of receipt checks. Hopefully I have given you a few helpful tips on how to try to resolve the issue. It is important to keep in mind that most honest shoppers will be willing to show receipts in order to help stop shoplifting and keep prices low.

 

A Sensormatic security system is important and we can help you with it. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.


     

Sizing Up The Uses For Clothing Security Tags



Clothing security tags – 3                                                                                              WC Blog 838
Sensormatic Tags – 3

Sizing Up The Uses For Clothing Security Tags

     Why in the world would a non-clothing retailer ever want to use Sensormatic clothing security tags, it doesn’t make sense…or does it? What kind of stores can and should use these tags? On the surface it seems that only clothing retail stores should. But some stores that are not necessarily considered clothing stores sell articles of clothing. For example I have walked into car part stores and have noticed that they sell baseball caps. I have been in a college bookstore that sells more than books. They sell all types of apparel from athletic shorts to college logo button down style shirts. Clothing theft happens wherever garments are sold. 

     Perhaps you are of the mindset that none of this matters because your store only sells bedding and bathroom accessories. You never ever sell clothing of any sort. You might have a point except that shoplifters will steal bedding and bath merchandise just as quickly as they would steal a pair of shoes. The good news for you is that Sensormatic clothing security tags are versatile enough to be used on all sorts of products made of material. I worked as a Loss Prevention Officer for a big box retailer and we protected high dollar comforters with Sensormatic tags. I have also seen them used on more expensive brands of sheet sets and bath towels. 

     Then there are the stores that sell groceries. Ahhh, I know you think you are immune to clothing theft so you don’t need to worry about using Sensormatic tags on clothes. Now wait a minute before you stop reading. Let me ask you a question. Do you have a Sensormatic security system in place already? Are you using food-safe Sensormatic labels to protect meats? If you already have an electronic article surveillance system in place, why are you limiting what you are using it for? Why not carry some gift t-shirts or ballcaps to increase sales? Do you carry aprons for your customers? We live near a beach and a lot of grocery stores sell t-shirts with the area’s name on it for souvenirs. They also sell beach towels, baseball hats and visors to drive sales. You could do the same but you should also protect them with anti-theft tags.

     There is a well-known computer/electronics store I like to shop at. They carry computers, video gaming systems, stereo systems, smart phones, etc. Guess what else they sell? You got it they sell licensed clothing and backpacks. Now this particular store does have merchandise protection systems in place but I cannot tell you if they use Sensormatic tags on clothing or not. If they don’t they should. As with the grocery store, the system is in place why not maximize it to the fullest?

     Clothing security tags are not solely for clothing merchandise retailers. They have multiple uses on a wide range of products. I have used them on golfing gloves and baseball mitts. I have seen them used on curtains and sofa covers. I have also seen them pinned through blister packages in hardware departments. From drill bits to power screw drivers the tags are sturdy enough to pierce tough plastic deterring crooks from trying to shoplift even these items.

     If you have a Sensormatic security system but you are only tagging those products you believe your store specializes in like a grocery store tagging meats only you are missing the boat. There are labels and tags available for all kinds of things you may carry and have not thought about. If you don’t have an electronic article surveillance system you are missing out on an opportunity to decrease shortage and improve sales. Sensormatic systems are more affordable than you might realize. I recommend you get one installed now and learn how many items you really CAN protect in your store.
Need information on Sensormatic tags? Give us a call at 1.866.914.2567 now.


Why in the world would a non-clothing retailer ever want to use Sensormatic clothing security tags, it doesn’t make sense…or does it? What kind of stores can and should use these tags? On the surface it seems that only clothing retail stores should. But some stores that are not necessarily considered clothing stores sell articles of clothing. For example I have walked into car part stores and have noticed that they sell baseball caps. I have been in a college bookstore that sells more than books. They sell all types of apparel from athletic shorts to college logo button down style shirts. Clothing theft happens wherever garments are sold. 
     

Perhaps you are of the mindset that none of this matters because your store only sells bedding and bathroom accessories. You never ever sell clothing of any sort. You might have a point except that shoplifters will steal bedding and bath merchandise just as quickly as they would steal a pair of shoes. The good news for you is that Sensormatic clothing security tags are versatile enough to be used on all sorts of products made of material. I worked as a Loss Prevention Officer for a big box retailer and we protected high dollar comforters with Sensormatic tags. I have also seen them used on more expensive brands of sheet sets and bath towels. 
     

Then there are the stores that sell groceries. Ahhh, I know you think you are immune to clothing theft so you don’t need to worry about using Sensormatic tags on clothes. Now wait a minute before you stop reading. Let me ask you a question. Do you have a Sensormatic security system in place already? Are you using food-safe Sensormatic labels to protect meats? If you already have an electronic article surveillance system in place, why are you limiting what you are using it for? Why not carry some gift t-shirts or ballcaps to increase sales? Do you carry aprons for your customers? We live near a beach and a lot of grocery stores sell t-shirts with the area’s name on it for souvenirs. They also sell beach towels, baseball hats and visors to drive sales. You could do the same but you should also protect them with anti-theft tags.
     

There is a well-known computer/electronics store I like to shop at. They carry computers, video gaming systems, stereo systems, smart phones, etc. Guess what else they sell? You got it they sell licensed clothing and backpacks. Now this particular store does have merchandise protection systems in place but I cannot tell you if they use Sensormatic tags on clothing or not. If they don’t they should. As with the grocery store, the system is in place why not maximize it to the fullest?
     

Clothing security tags are not solely for clothing merchandise retailers. They have multiple uses on a wide range of products. I have used them on golfing gloves and baseball mitts. I have seen them used on curtains and sofa covers. I have also seen them pinned through blister packages in hardware departments. From drill bits to power screw drivers the tags are sturdy enough to pierce tough plastic deterring crooks from trying to shoplift even these items.
     

If you have a Sensormatic security system but you are only tagging those products you believe your store specializes in like a grocery store tagging meats only you are missing the boat. There are labels and tags available for all kinds of things you may carry and have not thought about. If you don’t have an electronic article surveillance system you are missing out on an opportunity to decrease shortage and improve sales. Sensormatic systems are more affordable than you might realize. I recommend you get one installed now and learn how many items you really CAN protect in your store.

 

Need information on Sensormatic tags? Give us a call at 1.866.914.2567 now.