Pet Stores Profits Are On The Rise But Shoplifting Is Too – Prevent The Pilfering Of Puppy Apparel With Clothing Security Tags

 

Checkpoint Tags-4                                                                                                                   WC Blog 438
Clothing Security Tags-3
Pet Stores Profits Are On The Rise But Shoplifting Is Too – Prevent The Pilfering Of Puppy Apparel With Clothing Security Tags
     Pets, we love them in the U.S. in fact we love them so much that according to SAGE Business Researcher in an article titled, “The Pet Industry”, by Janice Arenofsky, February 27, 2017, the writer states, “Spending on pets in the United States continued to increase even through the 2007-2009 recession and hit an estimated $62.75 billion in 2016.” http://businessresearcher.sagepub.com/sbr-1863-102160-2772364/20170227/the-pet-industry That is quite a sum of money to spend on our furry (and sometimes not-so-furry for all you reptile, bird and insect lovers) friends. Many employers even offer pet insurance now (it is offered at the locations where I work). Where it once was taboo to bring a pet into a store it has now become commonplace. I see them in pet carriers, sometimes on leashes and occasionally I have seen them in baby strollers (at least I hope that was a dog otherwise there are some really ugly babies with wet noses out there). Relax, I’m just kidding folks. I tried to get some facts on how much Americans spend on pet clothing alone but I was unable to locate that information. What I was able to find was in a 2016 article, “Last Year, the NRF (National Retail Federation) estimated that $350 million was spent on pet costumes…” according to a cnbc.com article, “More consumers are purchasing pet costumes for Halloween than ever before”, by Sarah Whitten, 29 Oct 2016. If we are spending more than $350 million for pet costumes you can imagine how much we are spending for pet clothing overall. How do retailers protect their pet clothes? Why not protect them like we protect human clothing? Clothing security tags don’t have to be on human clothes only. 
     When I’m discussing clothing security tags, I’m referring to Checkpoint tags specifically. These devices are designed to prevent shoplifting through deterrence and the use of electronic article surveillance (EAS) technology. The way the tags work is they are designed so that they transmit a radio wave of a specific frequency. EAS pedestals located near key points in a building such as entrances and exits detect this specific radio frequency. When a tagged item is carried too close to the detection field the pedestals have alarms that are triggered. Store workers respond to those alarms, conduct receipt checks and recover unpaid merchandise. Checkpoint tags also deter shoplifters because they are designed to be visible and it is apparent they could very well damage merchandise if pried at or tampered with. Many professional shoplifters already know what the tags are when they see them and prefer to find products that don’t appear to be protected.
     So exactly how much do pet clothes run? One major pet retailer sells an “anxiety shirt” for $39.95 and sports team jerseys for up to $28.99. An online designer pet boutique store advertises a doggie hoodie for $64.99. I don’t spend $64.99 on a winter coat for me! The fact remains there are folks who will spend that kind of money to dress up a pet that already comes with a fur coat of its own. For traditional stores that carry these lines of merchandise it only makes sense that the merchandise should be protected from theft with clothing security tags. 
     Checkpoint tags can be applied to these clothing items in the same way they are attached to human clothes. The only difference is that the garments are smaller in size so the tags may appear to be bigger but the protection given is just as robust. Tiny clothing items stuffed in a purse will activate an EAS pedestal just as they would activate it if they were human clothes shoved into the same purse. While you are putting clothing security tags on doggie outerwear you should know you can use the same tags to protect other merchandise that may be of high value such as pet beds, collars and leashes. Shoplifting is made more difficult when merchants protect as many items as possible.
     Pets and pet accessories are big business. Where there is a store making a profit there will be shoplifters to pilfer. Prevent petty (and not so petty) theft by using Checkpoint tags on your pet softlines goods.
For more information about clothing security tags contact us or call 1.866.914.2567.

Pets, we love them in the U.S. in fact we love them so much that according to SAGE Business Researcher in an article titled, “The Pet Industry”, by Janice Arenofsky, February 27, 2017, the writer states, “Spending on pets in the United States continued to increase even through the 2007-2009 recession and hit an estimated $62.75 billion in 2016.” http://businessresearcher.sagepub.com/sbr-1863-102160-2772364/20170227/the-pet-industry That is quite a sum of money to spend on our furry (and sometimes not-so-furry for all you reptile, bird and insect lovers) friends. Many employers even offer pet insurance now (it is offered at the locations where I work). Where it once was taboo to bring a pet into a store it has now become commonplace. I see them in pet carriers, sometimes on leashes and occasionally I have seen them in baby strollers (at least I hope that was a dog otherwise there are some really ugly babies with wet noses out there). Relax, I’m just kidding folks. I tried to get some facts on how much Americans spend on pet clothing alone but I was unable to locate that information. What I was able to find was in a 2016 article, “Last Year, the NRF (National Retail Federation) estimated that $350 million was spent on pet costumes…” according to a cnbc.com article, “More consumers are purchasing pet costumes for Halloween than ever before”, by Sarah Whitten, 29 Oct 2016. If we are spending more than $350 million for pet costumes you can imagine how much we are spending for pet clothing overall. How do retailers protect their pet clothes? Why not protect them like we protect human clothing? Clothing security tags don’t have to be on human clothes only. 

When I’m discussing clothing security tags, I’m referring to Checkpoint tags specifically. These devices are designed to prevent shoplifting through deterrence and the use of electronic article surveillance (EAS) technology. The way the tags work is they are designed so that they transmit a radio wave of a specific frequency. EAS pedestals located near key points in a building such as entrances and exits detect this specific radio frequency. When a tagged item is carried too close to the detection field the pedestals have alarms that are triggered. Store workers respond to those alarms, conduct receipt checks and recover unpaid merchandise. Checkpoint tags also deter shoplifters because they are designed to be visible and it is apparent they could very well damage merchandise if pried at or tampered with. Many professional shoplifters already know what the tags are when they see them and prefer to find products that don’t appear to be protected.

So exactly how much do pet clothes run? One major pet retailer sells an “anxiety shirt” for $39.95 and sports team jerseys for up to $28.99. An online designer pet boutique store advertises a doggie hoodie for $64.99. I don’t spend $64.99 on a winter coat for me! The fact remains there are folks who will spend that kind of money to dress up a pet that already comes with a fur coat of its own. For traditional stores that carry these lines of merchandise it only makes sense that the merchandise should be protected from theft with clothing security tags. 

Checkpoint tags can be applied to these clothing items in the same way they are attached to human clothes. The only difference is that the garments are smaller in size so the tags may appear to be bigger but the protection given is just as robust. Tiny clothing items stuffed in a purse will activate an EAS pedestal just as they would activate it if they were human clothes shoved into the same purse. While you are putting clothing security tags on doggie outerwear you should know you can use the same tags to protect other merchandise that may be of high value such as pet beds, collars and leashes. Shoplifting is made more difficult when merchants protect as many items as possible.

Pets and pet accessories are big business. Where there is a store making a profit there will be shoplifters to pilfer. Prevent petty (and not so petty) theft by using Checkpoint tags on your pet softlines goods.

 

For more information about clothing security tags contact us or call 1.866.914.2567.

 

 

Understanding The Unspoken Crime Of Underwear Theft And How Checkpoint Tags Can Undercut The Shoplifting Underworld

Clothing security -4                                                                                                                          WC Blog 388
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Understanding The Unspoken Crime Of Underwear Theft And How Checkpoint Tags Can Undercut The Shoplifting Underworld 
     According to Merriam-Webster the following are slang or alternative words that refer to underwear; cutty sark (a term formed from the outdated words “cutty” meaning short and “sark” for shirt describing a short nightgown which they say inspired a famous ship name and that name inspired the brand of whiskey that goes by that name today). Knickers, a standard word for underwear mainly in Britain and a singlet another British term for a sleeveless undershirt. Other words include, tighty whities, underdrawers, unionsuit, unmentionables and pretties. I mention these little tidbits because to be honest I think it’s funny. Also, when we talk about clothing security I would guess that most of the time people tend to think of shirts, shoes, pants, dresses, skirts etc. I have caught thieves stealing all of these items. In addition to this list of stolen garments I have apprehended people stealing hats, socks, ties, purses, scarves and yes, underdrawers and all sorts of umentionables. It seems that when Checkpoint tags are used for clothing security to prevent shoplifting pretties and knickers are often overlooked for some reason.
     Clothing security tags come equipped with electronic article surveillance (EAS) technology built into them. A radio frequency signal produced by Checkpoint tags is set to a specific frequency that can be picked up by EAS pedestals if they are carried into the detection field of the pedestals. This means a protected garment can be carried throughout the store by customers but if a crook decides to attempt to shoplift the item the tag will cause the pedestal alarms to activate and alert employees that a theft is taking place.  Employees, in response to the alarm, go to the pedestals and conduct a receipt check and recover merchandise. In case you’re wondering why someone couldn’t just remove the tags and leave the store with the stolen merchandise, Checkpoint tags can only be removed with a Checkpoint detachment key. Attempts to pry the tags off or circumvent the security of the tags results in damaged merchandise and that defeats the reason the criminal is stealing in the first place.
     Is it a big deal to protect underwear when you take the time to protect all the other clothing in your store? There are some statistics from The Adair Group that can potentially sway opinions one way or the other:
According to their website, 15% of women own underwear that is five to ten years old. Ten percent of men have underwear that has seen over ten years of use. By these statistics it wouldn’t seem there is a lot of underwear being sold if it’s worn for so long.
The website also says that the average British woman owns 34 pair of underwear while the average American woman owns 21. Based on this information it would seem there may be a market for underwear.
Finally, they say that Euromonitor data for 2014 showed the global underwear market was worth over $110 billion dollars.
Of course it is this last piece of information that clears up any question as to why there needs to be clothing security for underwear. $110 billion dollars in underwear sales is a lot of money and therefore it is profitable enough to be a market for shoplifters.
     Thieves will steal clothing if they can make money off of it through resale or if they can use it themselves. Don’t allow shoplifters to leave your shelves and racks naked due to theft. Use Checkpoint tags on all of your clothing, undergarments included and install EAS pedestals at the store entry/exit points. You will prevent shoplifting and see unmentionable increases in underwear sales.
Checkpoint Tags are important and we can help you with it. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.
     

According to Merriam-Webster the following are slang or alternative words that refer to underwear; cutty sark (a term formed from the outdated words “cutty” meaning short and “sark” for shirt describing a short nightgown which they say inspired a famous ship name and that name inspired the brand of whiskey that goes by that name today). Knickers, a standard word for underwear mainly in Britain and a singlet another British term for a sleeveless undershirt. Other words include, tighty whities, underdrawers, unionsuit, unmentionables and pretties. I mention these little tidbits because to be honest I think it’s funny. Also, when we talk about clothing security I would guess that most of the time people tend to think of shirts, shoes, pants, dresses, skirts etc. I have caught thieves stealing all of these items. In addition to this list of stolen garments I have apprehended people stealing hats, socks, ties, purses, scarves and yes, underdrawers and all sorts of umentionables. It seems that when Checkpoint tags are used for clothing security to prevent shoplifting pretties and knickers are often overlooked for some reason.
     

Clothing security tags come equipped with electronic article surveillance (EAS) technology built into them. A radio frequency signal produced by Checkpoint tags is set to a specific frequency that can be picked up by EAS pedestals if they are carried into the detection field of the pedestals. This means a protected garment can be carried throughout the store by customers but if a crook decides to attempt to shoplift the item the tag will cause the pedestal alarms to activate and alert employees that a theft is taking place.  Employees, in response to the alarm, go to the pedestals and conduct a receipt check and recover merchandise. In case you’re wondering why someone couldn’t just remove the tags and leave the store with the stolen merchandise, Checkpoint tags can only be removed with a Checkpoint detachment key. Attempts to pry the tags off or circumvent the security of the tags results in damaged merchandise and that defeats the reason the criminal is stealing in the first place.
     

Is it a big deal to protect underwear when you take the time to protect all the other clothing in your store? There are some statistics from The Adair Group that can potentially sway opinions one way or the other:

According to their website, 15% of women own underwear that is five to ten years old. Ten percent of men have underwear that has seen over ten years of use. By these statistics it wouldn’t seem there is a lot of underwear being sold if it’s worn for so long.

The website also says that the average British woman owns 34 pair of underwear while the average American woman owns 21. Based on this information it would seem there may be a market for underwear.

Finally, they say that Euromonitor data for 2014 showed the global underwear market was worth over $110 billion dollars.

Of course it is this last piece of information that clears up any question as to why there needs to be clothing security for underwear. $110 billion dollars in underwear sales is a lot of money and therefore it is profitable enough to be a market for shoplifters.
     

Thieves will steal clothing if they can make money off of it through resale or if they can use it themselves. Don’t allow shoplifters to leave your shelves and racks naked due to theft. Use Checkpoint tags on all of your clothing, undergarments included and install EAS pedestals at the store entry/exit points. You will prevent shoplifting and see unmentionable increases in underwear sales.

 

Checkpoint Tags are important and we can help you with it. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.

     

 

Clothing Security Tags Can Help Or Hinder Customer Service; Tips To Ensure You Are Keeping Customers Happy – Part 2

Checkpoint Tags-4                                                                                                                          WC Blog 343
Clothing Security Tags -3 
Clothing Security Tags Can Help Or Hinder Customer Service; Tips To Ensure You Are Keeping Customers Happy – Part 2
In Part 1 of this article I talked about the frustrations customers have expressed on websites about getting clothing home and finding clothing security tags left on them. I also touched on what a security tag is and how it can improve merchandise shortage and therefore keep prices lower creating a positive customer experience. In Part 2 I want to discuss the issues that lead up to the customer service problem of Checkpoint tags being left on clothing and how it can negate the positive shopping experience your customers had while visiting the store.
     To refresh some who may have missed the first part of the series, Checkpoint tags are built with electronic article surveillance (EAS) technology that allow them to protect clothing. Soft versions of the tags have an adhesive backing that makes it easy to stick the devices to hang tags, plastics, even to the cloth inside a handbag, wallet, slacks pockets, etc. Checkpoint Hard Tags are reusable anti-theft devices that are pinned to garments and require a special removal tool to take them off.  Hard tags and soft tags placed in visible locations are deterrents to potential shoplifters. Thieves prefer not to risk setting off alarms or damaging merchandise in an attempt to pry or force tags off of clothing. The EAS technology in the tags makes them effective in stopping shoplifting by activating EAS pedestal alarms set at building entrances.
     So the question becomes, “How does  missing clothing security tags hamper customer experience levels and isn’t it a matter of just following up with a cashier?”  The fact is it is easy to automatically point the finger at the cashier and say it is a training issue. I would argue there may be a other underlying issues that lead up to the problem.
1. Tagging consistency – When merchandise comes in to the store there needs to be specific guidelines for where tags will be placed. For example, you may direct whoever tags your merchandise to place a tag on the right sleeve of every shirt. Slacks may be tagged in the right leg seam at hip level. Consistent placement of tags and communication to employees will mean cashiers will always look in the same location for tags. This minimizes the opportunity for errors at the register. 
2. Complete Tagging – Many stores set price points on what will or won’t be tagged or they decide only certain brands of merchandise will be tagged. Imagine you are the cashier that has to remember which items are and are not tagged! By tagging everything you eliminate the shoplifters looking for alternative items to take and you make it easier for cashiers to know they have to remove all tags from everything.
3. Measuring cashier speed times – Is your store the one that tracks cashier productivity and “ability” by how fast they can complete transactions? YOU may be contributing to your own problem. When cashiers feel pressured to rush through transactions so they don’t get penalized, they tend to make errors. Guess what frequently gets overlooked because the employee is trying to keep their score “green”? That’s right, clothing security tags not deactivated or missed removals. I understand you can’t have lines building up because a cashier wants to chit chat, but pressuring them to hurry can lead to all kinds of errors including cash shortages…did I get your attention on that one?
4. EAS alarm activation complacency – Are your employees immediately responding to alarms or are they waving at a customer and telling them they are “OK”? Perhaps your supervisors or employees are ignoring the alarms all together. I mentioned this in Part 1, the question arising, “If Checkpoint tags work and set off alarms, how could a customer get merchandise home with the tags still on them?” Here is my answer. Management is responsible for allowing complacency to set in and not addressing the problem. Prompt alarm follow-up can catch errors and show the paying customers you are concerned. It can keep them from feeling embarrassed or upset by the alarm. It is also your opportunity to coach the cashier that missed the tag or find out if there was a tagging problem on the floor. By the way, your shoplifters see how your teams respond to alarms. If they ignore them, the shoplifters know it and you’ve lost the deterrent effect of tagging. 
Checkpoint Tags are effective in deterring theft. Shoplifters tend to go elsewhere to steal when confronted with security tags on clothes and this leads to improved shortage. Customers benefit with lower prices and better instocks. Keep your customers happy with a strong tagging program.
Get more information on Checkpoint Tags, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.

In Part 1 of this article I talked about the frustrations customers have expressed on websites about getting clothing home and finding clothing security tags left on them. I also touched on what a security tag is and how it can improve merchandise shortage and therefore keep prices lower creating a positive customer experience. In Part 2 I want to discuss the issues that lead up to the customer service problem of Checkpoint tags being left on clothing and how it can negate the positive shopping experience your customers had while visiting the store.
     

To refresh some who may have missed the first part of the series, Checkpoint tags are built with electronic article surveillance (EAS) technology that allow them to protect clothing. Soft versions of the tags have an adhesive backing that makes it easy to stick the devices to hang tags, plastics, even to the cloth inside a handbag, wallet, slacks pockets, etc. Checkpoint Hard Tags are reusable anti-theft devices that are pinned to garments and require a special removal tool to take them off.  Hard tags and soft tags placed in visible locations are deterrents to potential shoplifters. Thieves prefer not to risk setting off alarms or damaging merchandise in an attempt to pry or force tags off of clothing. The EAS technology in the tags makes them effective in stopping shoplifting by activating EAS pedestal alarms set at building entrances.
     

So the question becomes, “How does  missing clothing security tags hamper customer experience levels and isn’t it a matter of just following up with a cashier?”  The fact is it is easy to automatically point the finger at the cashier and say it is a training issue. I would argue there may be a other underlying issues that lead up to the problem.

1. Tagging consistency – When merchandise comes in to the store there needs to be specific guidelines for where tags will be placed. For example, you may direct whoever tags your merchandise to place a tag on the right sleeve of every shirt. Slacks may be tagged in the right leg seam at hip level. Consistent placement of tags and communication to employees will mean cashiers will always look in the same location for tags. This minimizes the opportunity for errors at the register. 

2. Complete Tagging – Many stores set price points on what will or won’t be tagged or they decide only certain brands of merchandise will be tagged. Imagine you are the cashier that has to remember which items are and are not tagged! By tagging everything you eliminate the shoplifters looking for alternative items to take and you make it easier for cashiers to know they have to remove all tags from everything.

3. Measuring cashier speed times – Is your store the one that tracks cashier productivity and “ability” by how fast they can complete transactions? YOU may be contributing to your own problem. When cashiers feel pressured to rush through transactions so they don’t get penalized, they tend to make errors. Guess what frequently gets overlooked because the employee is trying to keep their score “green”? That’s right, clothing security tags not deactivated or missed removals. I understand you can’t have lines building up because a cashier wants to chit chat, but pressuring them to hurry can lead to all kinds of errors including cash shortages…did I get your attention on that one?

4. EAS alarm activation complacency – Are your employees immediately responding to alarms or are they waving at a customer and telling them they are “OK”? Perhaps your supervisors or employees are ignoring the alarms all together. I mentioned this in Part 1, the question arising, “If Checkpoint tags work and set off alarms, how could a customer get merchandise home with the tags still on them?” Here is my answer. Management is responsible for allowing complacency to set in and not addressing the problem. Prompt alarm follow-up can catch errors and show the paying customers you are concerned. It can keep them from feeling embarrassed or upset by the alarm. It is also your opportunity to coach the cashier that missed the tag or find out if there was a tagging problem on the floor. By the way, your shoplifters see how your teams respond to alarms. If they ignore them, the shoplifters know it and you’ve lost the deterrent effect of tagging. 

 

Checkpoint Tags are effective in deterring theft. Shoplifters tend to go elsewhere to steal when confronted with security tags on clothes and this leads to improved shortage. Customers benefit with lower prices and better instocks. Keep your customers happy with a strong tagging program.

 

Get more information on Checkpoint Tags, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.